Large Godey's Logo

Godey’s Lady’s Book, The Liberator, and The Pennsylvania Gazette

In Philadelphia, in 1830, Louis Antoine Godey (1804-1878) began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book which he designed specifically to attract the growing audience of American women.

The magazine was intended to entertain, inform and educate the women of America. Gradually the periodical matured into an important literary magazine containing extensive book reviews and works by Harriet Beecher Stowe, Edgar Allen Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and many other celebrated 19th century authors who regularly furnished the magazine with essays, poetry and short stories.

 

Godey’s Lady’s Book also was a vast reservoir of handsome illustrations which included hand-colored fashion plates, mezzotints, engravings, woodcuts and, ultimately, chromolithographs.  Today Godey’s Lady’s Book is considered to be among the most important resources of 19th century American life and culture. This Accessible Archives collection provides the complete run of Godey’s Lady’s Book, and is the only one containing the color plates as they originally appeared.

The Liberator was a weekly newspaper published by William Lloyd Garrison in Boston, Massachusetts.  On January 1, 1831 the first issue of The Liberator appeared with the motto: “Our country is the world—our countrymen are mankind.” Garrison was a journalistic crusader who advocated the immediate emancipation of all slaves and gained a national reputation for being one of the most radical of American abolitionists. The Liberator denounced the Compromise of 1850, condemned the Kansas-Nebraska Act, damned the Dred Scott decision and hailed John Brown’s raid as “God’s method of dealing retribution upon the head of the tyrant.” The slaveholders in the South demanded the end of the incendiary paper and the state of Georgia offered a $5,000 reward for Garrison’s capture. The Liberator was a mighty force from the beginning and became the most influential newspaper in the antebellum antislavery crusade.

After the end of the Civil War in December, 1865, Garrison published his last issue of The Liberator, announcing “my vocation as an abolitionist is ended.” After thirty-five years and 1,820 issues, Garrison had not failed to publish a single issue.

The Pennsylvania Gazette was one of the United States’ most prominent newspapers from 1728—before the time period of the American Revolution—until 1800. Published in Philadelphia from 1728 through 1800, The Pennsylvania Gazette is considered The New York Times of the 18th century.  The Pennsylvania Gazette provides the reader with a first-hand view of colonial America, the American Revolution and the New Republic, and offers important social, political and cultural perspectives of each of the periods. Thousands of articles, editorials, letters, news items and advertisements cover the Western Hemisphere, from the Canadian Maritime Provinces through the West Indies and North and South America, presenting a detailed glimpse of issues and lifestyles of the times. Also included is the full-text of such important writings as the Declaration of Independence, the ConstitutionLetters from a Farmer, Thomas Payne’s Common SenseThe Federalist Papers and much more. It is claimed that the publication later reemerged as The Saturday Evening Post.

All images included in blog posts are from either Accessible Archives collections or out of copyright public sources unless otherwise noted. Common sources include the Library of Congress, The Flickr Commons, Wikimedia Commons, and other public archives.

Related Posts

Tags: , , , ,

Stay Connected

Connect with Accessible Archives on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, or Linkedin to stay up to date on news and blog posts or get our latest blog posts by email.