A Look Inside The Third Massachusetts Cavalry in the War for the Union

From the Introduction:

There are certain distinguishing characteristics of the American soldier in the war for the Union, which mark him and make him to stand forth illustrious.

He was characterized by a most remarkable patriotism. His patriotism was not passive, but active. Daniel Webster once said that there are times when the most eloquent thing in the world is action. He tells us when those times occur. They come to a man when the life of his family or the nation hangs trembling in the balance. “Then patriotism is eloquent, then self-devotion is eloquent.” That time came when the gathering storm of disunion burst upon the country. The nation’s life hung trembling in the balance. Treason was in the air Sumter had fallen. The flag had been insulted. Washington was menaced, and the streets of Baltimore ran red with Massachusetts blood. Then, flashing along the wires, there came the call for troops.

Dedication

To the Heroic Men, who, in the War for the Union, followed the Flag, on Land and Sea, this Volume is affectionately Dedicated by The Author.

Foreword

After many year of waiting, a history of the Third Mass. Cavalry is now given to the world. Having been commissioned to execute the work, it is with great satisfaction that the author now announces that the enterprise has been brought to a successful consummation. Great labor has been involved in the undertaking. So scattered are the living members of the regiment, and so imperfect the records kept by the officers, that the task imposed of making a complete history of the organization has not been ordinary. The historian has striven to give as complete and accurate a statement of facts as possible under the circumstances. Mistakes will be discovered; the impossible has not been attempted.

In performing this work the writer has been greatly aided by the members of the Historical Committee; by Sec. George H. Rymill, and by Capt. J. W. Hervey.

His thanks are due to Putnam & Sons, New York, for cuts of battlefields; to Harper & Bros., and to the Star Publishing Co. of Chicago, for permission to copy certain interesting scenes in the regimental life.

The following works have been consulted:

Greeley’s American Conflict“, “Harper’s Pictorial History of the War“, “Irwin’s History of the 19th Corps“, published by Putnam & Sons, N. Y., and “Campaigning with Banks and Sheridan,” by Flynn.

The author is greatly indebted to the Adjutant General’s Reports for 1863-1866, as compiled by Lieut.-Col. D. P. Muzzey, of Cambridge.

If this History shall in some degree serve to perpetuate the record of the gallant regiment whose deeds are herein narrated, and if the rising generation shall, perchance, gather somewhat of inspiration from the perusal of these pages, the author shall be rewarded for the time and toil expended in the preparation and publication of the work.

J. K. E

The Grand Review

The Grand Review

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

The record of the struggle for liberty in America constitutes one of the brightest pages in the history of the world. In her gigantic struggle, Freedom has summoned to her side the fairest and the best of the children of men. Her poets, her orators, her statesmen, her philosophers have stirred the hearts of millions; while her soldiers have filled the world with the fame and glory of their deeds.

Chapter I — IN THE CAMP OF INSTRUCTION

The Summer of ’62 — Lincoln’s Call — The Men of the Forty-First — Beginnings of Regimental Life — Our Officers — The First Night in Camp — Captain Swift Makes a Speech — The Regimental Line — Major, Sergeant; Lieut-Colonel Wass, Colonel Chickering — The Staff — Removal to Boxford — Drill — Our Colors, Uniforms, Arms and Equipments — Dress Parade — Amusements — Colonel Wass tells a Story — Soldier’s Songs — Food and Drink — Sworn in — “All Aboard for Boston” — Good Bye to Camp Stanton.

Chapter II. — EN ROUTE FOR THE WAR

Arrival in Boston — Haymarket Square—Our Escort — Revolutionary Memories — Boston Common — Governor Andrew Reviews the Regiment — March to Old Colony Station — On the Fall River Steamer “State of Maine”—Arrival in New York — In the Park Barracks — Officers’ Reception — The Camp at Long Island —A Cook-House Riot—Thanksgiving Day, 1862 — Off for New York — A Secret Expedition.

Chapter III. — ON AN OCEAN TRANSPORT

Embarkation of the Forty-first — The “North Star” — “ A Life on the Ocean Wave”—Seasickness — In the Gulf of Mexico — Ship Island — Arrival at New Orleans — Banks Relieves Butler—Rapid Firing on the Forty-first — The Nineteenth Army Corps — General Cuvier Grover’s Division — A Solemn Night — The Retaking of Baton Rouge — Landing of the Forty-first — A Bloodless Engagement.

Chapter IV. — IN THE ENEMY’S COUNTRY

Throwing up Earthworks—On Picket—Burning of State House—General Inspection—Loading and Firing—Brigade Drill—Reviewed by General Grover—Death of James Steele—Resignation of Colonel Wass—Another Removal of Camp—Picket Firing—Bridge Burning—Grand Review by Banks, Augur and Grover—The Feint on Port Hudson—Destruction of the “Mississippi.”

Chapter V. — THE TECHE CAMPAIGN

The Departure of Grover’s Division from Baton Rouge—Through the Country to Brashear City—Longfellow’s Description of this Place—Up Grand Lake—Battle of Irish Bend—Battle of Bisland—Retreat of Dick Taylor—Destruction of the “Diana”—Arrival at New Iberia—Destruction of Salt Works—On to Opelousas—Colonel Chickering in Command—Capture of Alexandria—The March to Barre’s Landing—Infantile Cavalymen—Chickering’s Retreat—Arrival at Brashear City—End of Teche Campaign.

Chapter VI. — PORT HUDSON

From Brashear City to New Orleans — From Algiers to Port Hudson — Springfield Landing — Plains Store — Grierson’s Command — Picket Duty — The 14th of June, 1863 — Assault on Port Hudson — A raid on Springfield Landing — An Attack on the Clinton Road — “Blackberries and Bullets for Breakfast” — The “Forlorn Hope” — Order of General Banks, No. 144 — Arms and Equipments — A Promise that was Never Kept — Surrender of Port Hudson.

Chapter VII. — PORT HUDSON, Continued.

The Summer of ’63 —A Trio of Triumphs—A Year of Service — The Third Cavalry in Garrison — Repairing the Telegraph — Capture of Lieutenant Gove — Death of Private Bosworth — Foraging in the Fall of ’63 — Our New Companies — Our New Officers — Promotions — Port Hudson after the Surrender — Marching Orders.

Chapter VIII. — LIFE IN A COTTON PRESS

On a River Transport — The “Laurel Hill” — The “Empire Parish” — Memories of Port Hudson — The Father of Waters — Arrival at New Orleans — A Cotton Press for Barracks — A Day’s Duty — Doing the City — Statue of Andrew Jackson — Battlefield of Chalmette — The Marine Hospital — Inauguration of a Governor — The Officers’ Wives — Review at Carrollton — General Grant at New Orleans — Beginning of Red River Campaign — Our New Battle-Flag — Our Commanders — Crossing the Mississippi — On the March.

Chapter IX. — THE RED RIVER CAMPAIGN

Object of the Expedition—The Forces Engaged—March of the Third Cavalry—From Algiers to Donaldsonville—To Brashear City—Crossing Berwick Bay—Centreville—Through Camp Bisland to Franklin—Arrival at Opelousas—The Third reaches Alexandria—Capture of Henderson’s Hill—Arrival at Death’s Hill—Crossing of Cane River—Capture of Natchitoches—Arrival at Pleasant Hill—Skirmishing—Driving the Confederates—Dick Taylor at Bay—Franklin’s Prophecy—The Gathering Storm.

Chapter X. — THE RED RIVER CAMPAIGN, Continued.

The Battle of Sabine Cross Roads—The Third Cavalry in the Advance—Coolness of Colonel Sargent—The Enemy Advances—Ransom’s Heroic Fight—Nim’s Battery in Danger—The Cavalry Falls Back—Captain Twitchell’s Horse Wounded—The Regiment Falls Back—Retreat to Pleasant Hill—Regimental Losses—Emory the Deliverer—What General Banks said—Battle of Pleasant Hill—Retreat to Grand Ecore.

Chapter XI. — THE RED RIVER CAMPAIGN, Continued.

Guarding the Wagon Trains—Scouting at Natchitoches—Davis Succeeds Dudley—Confederate Cavalry Charge on the Gunboats—“Tom Green” loses his Head—A Dispatch from Grant—Retreat from Grand Ecore—Battle of Cane River—The Enemy Beaten—Crossing the River—The Devouring Flames—The Third at Muddy Bayou—In Camp at Alexandria—Crossing Red River—A Fight with Quantrell—The Writer Wounded.

Chapter XII. — THE RED RIVER CAMPAIGN, Concluded.

Back to Alexandria—Hospital Scenes—A Critical Case—McClernand Sick—Franklin’s Wound—Confederate Depredations—The Third to the Rescue—Evacuation of Alexandria—The Regiment at Moore’s Plantation—The Fight at Bayou de Glace—A Magnificent Sight—Battle of Yellow Bayou—Arrival at Morgania.

Chapter XIII. — TRANSFERRED TO VIRGINIA

A Season of Rest—A Mosquito Night Attack—Canby in Command—Three Grand Reviews—A Visit from General Sickles—Washington in Danger—The Nineteenth Corps Ordered North—The Regiment Dismounted—Down the River to Algiers—On the Ocean—Colonel Sargent Arrives at Fortress Monroe—Arrival in Washington—The Nineteenth Corps to the Rescue—The Third Reaches Chain Bridge—Arrives at Monocacy—Sheridan in Command—March to Cedar Creek—Retreat to Halltown—The Army Advances—The Strength of the Regiment.

Chapter XIV. — BATTLE OF THE OPEQUON

Grover’s Division—Molineux’s Brigade—Charge of the Third Cavalry—Death of Russell—Emory again Saves the Army—The Third Charges again—A Third Attempt—Defeat of Early—Death of Rodes—FitzHugh Lee Wounded—Sheridan Rides along the Line—Washington Encouraged—Losses in the Battle Death of Lieutenant Glidden—A Romance of Winchester—Battle of Fisher’s Hill—On to Staunton—In Camp at Harrisburg—Mt. Crawford—Retreat to Cedar Creek—Throwing up Earthworks—Sheridan Goes to Washington—Wright in Command—Sleeping amid Danger.

Chapter XV. — BATTLE OF CEDAR CREEK

Location of Camp—Cedar Creek a Surprise—Position of the Troops—Early’s Plot—Gordon and Kershaw Creeping Up—Thoburn Surprised—Stampede of the Eighth Corps—The Nineteenth Corps Pressed Back—The Third Cavalry Supports the Artillery—Wright Orders a Retreat—The Middletown Cemetery—Emory at Red Hill—Sheridan’s Arrival—The Army Inspired—Sheridan Rides Down the Line— “Back to Your Camps”—Charge of the Third Cavalry—Early Routed—The Cavalry Pursues—Capture of Artillery etc.—Many Prisoners Taken—Great Rejoicing—Sheridan’s Losses—Death of Lieut. James—The Victory in Song—“Thanksgiving.”

Chapter XVI. — LAST DAYS IN THE VALLEY

Breaking up of the Army—Sheridan Reviews the Troops—His Appreciation of his Soldiers—Sheridan’s Great Raid—A Big Snow-Storm—Hancock in Command—The Regiment Remounted—Sheridan’s Prisoners—The coming of Spring—Sheridan Joins Grant—Colonel Sargent Goes Home—Burr Porter in Command—Grant Breaks Lee’s Lines—Surrender of Lee—Lincoln Assassinated—The Regiment Ordered to Washington—Arrival at Fort Albany—In Camp at Fall’s Church—Muster-out of Original Members.

Chapter XVII. — THE GRAND REVIEW

Assembling of Armies—How the Men Looked—Their Number and Exploits—The Third Cavalry Crosses Long Bridge—The First Day’s Parade—Army of the Potomac—Sheridan’s Cavalry—The Third Cavalry on Pennsylvania Avenue—Sheridan’s Love for the Nineteenth Corps—Sherman’s Army in Review—Custer’s Horse Frightened—Sherman and the Roses—The Flag of the Third Cavalry.

Chapter XVIII. — IN AND AROUND WASHINGTON

After the Review, What?—The Third at Cloud’s Mills—Washington in 1865—Soldier’s Home—The White House—An Interview with Lincoln—Arlington Heights—The Nation’s Dead—Alexandria—Mount Vernon—The Capitol Return of Captain Gove.

Chapter XIX. — OUT WEST

A Home Feeling — Grant’s Congratulatory Order — A Western Fever that was not Epidemic — The Start for the West — Stay at Fort Leavenworth — Again Dismounted — A Reorganization — New Horses — March to Fort Kearney — Colonel Vinal Goes Home — Pay Day in Camp — A Start for Colorado — Return to Fort Kearney — Mustered Out — Return to Boston — Discharged at Gallops Island.

History of Read’s Company

Camp Chase, Lowell, to Ship Island.

Baileys Bridge of Boats

Baileys Bridge of Boats

Reminiscences

Lieutenant Dane and the Signal Corps, The Forlorn Hope and the Third Cavalry, Lieutenant Muzzey and the Female Spy, Death of Captain Solon A. Perkins, Wounding of Lieutenant Bradley Dean, The Capture of Major Cowen, Carrying Dispatches for Banks at Alexandria-, A Concert at Baton Rouge, The Robbing of Samuel Corning, Confiscating Cotton at Port Hudson, Corporal Harlow and Tyler, Texas, Porter Colby as a Prisoner of War, Letter of Captain Hervey, Letters of Captain John L. Swift, The Regimental Memorial

Biographical Sketches

Generals

Grover
Dudley
Molineux
Chickeriug
Wass
Swift
Loud

Colonels

Sargent
Porter
Pope
Vinal
Muzzey

Majors

Blanchard
Bunker
Commerford
Gifford
Noyes

Captains

Braman
Dean
Frothingham
Gould
Gove
Grover
Hervey
Howland
Rhoades
Stoddard
Smith

Lieutenants

Adams
Curry
Granger
Fenno
Pope
Pierce
Rowley
Sanborn
Weston

Enlisted Men

Burrage
Peck
Watts
Thomas
Harlow
Bates
Burke
Ewer
Campbell
Colby
Gallagher
Gifford
Harris
Holder
Jaquish
Knight
Lovering
McNaught
Peckham
Ridley
Rymill
Stanley
Thayer
Vannah

On Picket Duty

On Picket Duty

List of Illustrations

Views of Lynnfield
Boston & Maine R. R. Station
State House, Boston
Old Colony R. R. Station,
Camp at Union Race Course, L. I.
The “North Star”
Baton Rouge in ’62
Landing of the 41st at Baton Rouge
On Picket
Battle of Irish Bend
Port Hudson Just before the surrender
Banks’ Headquarters at Port Hudson
The Forlorn Hepe Marching into Port Hudson
The Formal Surrender
Gov. Andrew’s Headquarters at Port Hudson
Fortifications at Port Hudson
Post Guard House, Port Hudson
Chalmette Monument
Jackson’s Statue
Mud March at Henderson Hill
Rescue of the Fleet
Bailey’s Bridge of Boats
Battle of the Opequon
Sheridan’s Headquarters at Winchester
Cedar Creek, Va
Sheridan’s Headquarters at Cedar Creek
Sheridan’s Headquarters at Kernstown
Sheridan’s Cavalry passing through Washington in Grand Review
Arlington
Ford’s Theatre
Mount Vernon
The Long Bridge
Boston
The Last Call. — Finis

Maps, Plans, Charts, Etc.

Irish Bend Battlefield
Port Hudson, Camp of 3rd Cavalry
Red River Region
Sabine Cross Roads, Position of 3rd Cavalry
Opequon Battlefield
Cedar Creek Battlefield
The Shenandoah Valley

Portraits

Brig-Gen. Thomas E. Chickering
Regimental Officers
Historical Committee
Sergeants Stone and Bullock
Colonel Lorenzo D. Sargent
Lieut.-Col. Vinal and Surg. Blanchard
Colonel Fred G. Pope
Lieut.-Col. D. P. Muzzey
Majors Gifford, Commerford, Noyes and Bunker.
Colonel Chickering as Colone! of Cavalry
Capts. Frothingham and Seamans
Capts. Hervey, Howland, Hodges and Rhoades
Capt. Bradley Dean
Capt. Charles E. Grover
Capt. Wesley A. Gove
Lieut. P. S. Curry
Gen. N. A. M. Dudley
Gen. Geo. B. Loud
Capt. G. F. Stevens; Hon. H. B. Lovering
Rev. James K. Ewer
Lieuts. Weston, Sanborn, Otis, Rowley
Lieuts. Adams and Hughes
Group of Rifle Rangers
Lieut. Henry D. Pope
C. F. Read and G. W. Burke
Major H. C. Dane
F. T. Holder
Sergts. Watts, Peck, Nason, Gallegher
G W. Stacey and W. E. Corthell
Corp. J. C. Thomas, Corp. T. Harlow, C. A Littlefield, I. W. Campbell
J. A. Small, S. Corning, J. H. Kingsley, J. A. Bates, H. K. Langdon
B. M. St. Clair, A. S. Vannah, Geo. H. Rymill, W. H. Wiley, J. McNaught
Genls. John L. Swift, S. Tyler Read, E. L. Molineux, B. H. Grierson
Capt. James W. Hervey, Lieut. E. L. Pierce
Lieut. R. B. Granger, M.D., Lieut. Grafton Fenno
M. A. Harris, T. A. Stanley, J. F. Dorsey, J. H. Pratt, D. S. Knight
W. L. Kelley, I. H. Cook, C. T. Emery, Chas. S. Thayer
William H. Jaquish (in 1863) Wm. H. Jaquish (present time)
Where the Regimental Life Began.

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