PGC Listings

The Pennsylvania Genealogical Catalogue – 1824 – Marriages

This collection originally included listings of marriages, deaths, obituaries, and other notices from The Village Record, published in West Chester, Pennsylvania.

It has been expanded to include records that shed light on emigration patterns, customs and traditions, important events, medical history, biographical data, and more.

Marriages

  • Village Record on January 7, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Friends meeting, Providence, on the 1st inst., CHARLES L. SLEEPER, to RACHEL WILSON, daughter of Thomas Wilson, of Providence, all of Delaware county.
  • Village Record on January 7, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By W. Newlin, Esq. on the 19th of Nov. Mr. NATHAN MATLACK, to Miss LYDIA NEWLIN, both of Delaware county.
  • Village Record on January 7, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By W. Newlin, Esq. on the 25th ult. at Downingtown, Mr. FREDERICK ANDREWS, to Miss PHEBE V. MAXTON, both of Chester county.
  • Village Record on January 14, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 8th inst. by Wm. Everhart, Esq. Mr. WILLIAM BARR, of West Chester, to Miss PRISCILLA MATLACK, of West Goshen.
  • Village Record on January 21, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 6th isnt. by James Wollerton, Esq., Mr. THOMAS THOMPSON, to Miss SYBIL HARRY, both of Chester county.
  • Village Record on January 21, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 8th, by James Wollerton, Esq., Mr. JOSHUA BAILY, jr., of Newlin, to Miss MARY FOSTER, of Londongrove, both of Chester county.
  • Village Record on January 28, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Hamilton Village, on the 14th inst. by George C. Lentner, Esq. Mr. JOSHUA PHIPPS, to Miss MARY H. MATLOCK, all of Chester county.
  • Village Record on January 28, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Hartsville, on the 15th inst. by the Rev. Mr. Ashton, Mr. PETER HILES, to Miss MARTHA BOGGS, both of Blockley.
  • Village Record on January 28, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Monday the 19th inst., by the Rev. Mr. Graham, Mr. WILLIAM WATT, to Miss ANN DUNKEN, both of New London Cross Roads, Chester county.
  • Village Record on January 28, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 12th Inst., at Lancaster, by Nathaniel Lightner, Esq. Alderman, Mr. WILLIAM McCAULLEY, Merchant, Brandywine, Delaware, to Miss SARAH L. SINCLAIR, daughter of Samuel Sinclair, of Kennet township, Chester county.
  • Village Record on January 28, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Tuesday evening the 13th inst., by the Rev. Mr. Gragham, Mr. JOHN NEVIN, of Christianna bridge, Delaware State, to Miss ELIZA E. WILKIN, of New London, Chester county.
  • Village Record on February 11, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Coatesville, Chester county, by the Rev. J. Latta, Mr. MILLER FRAME, to Miss ANN ELIZABETH DEMRITH, both of the city of Lancaster.
  • Village Record on February 18, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 12th inst. by Abraham Baily, Esq. Mr. URIAH CLAYTON, to Miss SARAH WOODWARD, daughter of Mr. Richard Woodward, all of West Bradford township, Chester county.
  • Village Record on February 18, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 18th December last, by Maskel Ewing, Esq., Mr. JOHN D. SMITH, of Upper Darby, to Miss SIDNEY CALVERT, of Newtown township, Delaware county.
  • Village Record on February 18, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 5th inst. by the Rev. Phineas Price, Mr. RICHARD JONES, to Miss JANE WILLIAMS, both of West Whiteland, Chester county.
  • Village Record on February 18, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 5th inst. by Wm. Everhart, Esq. Mr. AMOS GARRETT, to Miss THOMASAN BISHOP, both of Chester county.
  • Village Record on March 3, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By William Everhart, Esq. on the 25th ult., Mr. JACOB MINSTER, of East Goshen, to Miss ANN BAYARS, of West Goshen.
  • Village Record on March 3, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage Married at the Western Hotel, Philadelphia on Thursday the 19th inst., by Alderman James N. Baker, Mr. MIFFLIN MOORE, to Miss ELIZABETH SMITH, both of Delaware county.
  • Village Record on March 3, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Saturday the 21st of February by the Rev. John Geforth; Mr. CHARLES CHRISTY, of Oxford Village, to Miss ELIZABETH SIDWELL, of Hopewell, both of East Nottingham township, Chester county.
  • Village Record on March 10, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By the Rev. Wm. Johnson, on the 12th ultimo, Mr. RICHARD HUMPTON RUSSELL, of Upper Oxford, to Miss RUTH ANN ALEXANDER, of West Marlborough township, Chester county.
  • Village Record on March 10, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 3d of January last, by the Rev. Wm. Johnson, Mr. CONRAD LAZIER to Miss SARAH DRAPER [?] both of West Marlborough township, Chester county.
  • Village Record on March 10, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 4th instant, by the Rev. E.E. Dare, Mr. PHINEAS HOOD, to Miss MARGARET COOK, both of Oxford, Chester county.
  • Village Record on March 10, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Wednesday evening, March 3d, by the Rev. Wm. Hodgson, ISAAC THOMAS, M.D. to ANN CHARLTON MINER, all of West Chester.
  • Village Record on March 24, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 16th inst. by the Rev. E.K. Dare, Mr. WILLIAM MOSES MONTGOMERY, to Miss ELIZA JONES, both of Little Britain, Lancaster county.
  • Village Record on March 24, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 18th inst. by the Rev. E.K. Dare, Mr. THOMAS KENNEDY, to Miss ANN McCORKLE, both of Doe Run, Chester county.
  • Village Record on March 24, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 18th inst., by Wm. Everhart, Esq. Mr. SAMUEL LEEDOM, of Delaware county, to Miss ELIZA STEELE, of Chester county.
  • Village Record on March 31, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Marshalton, on the 28th instant, by Abraham Baily, Esq. Mr. JESSE McFARLAND, to Miss ANN CARTER, both of Chester county.
  • Village Record on March 31, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 10th ult. at Friends meeting house, in East Marlborough, CALEB WICKERSHAM to ABIGAIL S. PYLE, both of Chester county.
  • Village Record on March 31, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 25th inst. by the Rev. Phineas Price, Mr. ALEXANDER MURDOCK, of West Nantmeal, to Miss ISABELLA R. HUMES, of East Goshen.
  • Village Record on April 21, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Friends’meeting house, Concord, GEORGE MARTIN, Jr. to EDITH SHARPLESS, both of Delaware county.
  • Village Record on April 21, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Friends’Meeting in this borough, on Fourth day, the 14th of 4th month, BOND [?] VALENTINE, Esq. Attorney at Law, to LYDIA FAIRLAMB, both of West Chester.
  • Village Record on April 21, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Oswego, New York, on the 11th inst. by the Rev. Mr. Lombeart, Mr. JOHN ROSET, Merchant of Philadelphia, to Miss MARY ANN LANNING, daughter of the late General John Lanning of the former place.
  • Village Record on April 21, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 25th ult. by the Rev. J. Johnson, Mr. ISAAC EDWARDS Jr. to Miss LUCRETIAN WALKER, both of Penn, Chester county.
  • Village Record on April 21, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 27th ult. by the Rev. J. Johnson, Mr. JAMES HANNAH to Miss HESTER ALES, both of Lancaster county.
  • Village Record on May 5, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By the Rev. Jethro Johnson, on the 20th ult. Mr. DAVID GILMORE, to Miss MARIA ROSS, all of Chester county.
  • Village Record on May 5, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 11th ult. by John Morgan, Esq. Mr. JAMES BOLTON, to Miss MARY ANN KIRK, both of Montgomery county, Pa.
  • Village Record on May 5, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 7th ult. by the Rev. Jethro Johnson, Mr. JOSEPH McCOY, of the State of Maryland, to Miss MARIA THOMAS, of Delaware.
  • Village Record on May 12, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 25th ult., by the Rev. J.G. Clay, Mr. JAMES GAULT, of Lancaster county, to Miss JULIA ANN THOMAS, daughter of Zadock Thomas, Esq. of Norriton township, Montgomery county.
  • Village Record on June 9, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Carlisle, ROBERT COLEMAN HALL, Esq. of Sunbury, son of the late Charles Hall, Esquire, to Miss SARAH ANN WATTS, daughter of the late David Watts, Esq.
  • Village Record on June 9, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Philadelphia on Wednesday the 19th instant, by the Rev. Dr. Sargeant, Mr. JAMES WINNARD, Editor of the Norristown Weekly Register, to Miss HANNAH LEAR, of the Northern Liberties.
  • Village Record on June 9, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By the Rev. Jacob M. Douglas, on the 15th ult. Mr. THOMAS JAMES, to Miss MARY ANN YOUNG, daughter of Mr. Andrew Young, all of Delaware county.
  • Village Record on June 23, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Friends Meeting House, Pine street, on 4th day, the 16th inst., DANIEL B. SMITH, to ESTHER MORTON, daughter of John Morton, all of Philadelphia.
  • Village Record on June 23, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 15th inst. by Wm. Everhart, Esq. Mr. SAMUEL ALLEN, of Honeybrook, to Miss JULIANN BICKEN, of Brandywine, all of Chester county.
  • Village Record on June 30, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage In Philadelphia, on the 3d instant, by Joseph Watson, Mayor, Mr. CHARLES CADWALLADER, Merchant, of Dolington, Bucks county, to Miss RACHEL SELLERS, of Philadelphia.
  • Village Record on June 30, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 17th inst. at Monroeville, Philadelphia county, by the Rev. Joseph H. Kennard, Mr. JOHN MOORE, to Miss MARY ANN KEY, both of Chester county.
  • Village Record on June 30, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 24th of April, by James Dilworth, Esq. Mr. SAMUEL HOLMES, to Miss MARY RICHARDSON, both of West Whiteland, Chester county.
  • Village Record on June 30, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 8th inst. by the Rev. Mr. Bull, Mr. ROBERT JARDEN, of Philadelphia, to Miss ELIZA TEMPLIN, daughter of Mr. John Templin, of Chester county.
  • Village Record on July 7, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage In Philadelphia, on the 24th ult. Mr. RICHARD MILLESON, jr. to Miss ELIZABETH BALDWIN, both of West Bradford, Chester county.
  • Village Record on July 21, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage In Chester township, Delaware county, on Thursday evening the 15th inst. by the Rev. Mr. Woolson, Mr. ABNER PIERCE to Miss MARY CARTER.
  • Village Record on July 21, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage In Chester township, Delaware county, on Thursday evening the 15th inst. by the Rev. Mr. Woolson, Mr. GILEAD CARTER to Miss MARGARET MARKER.
  • Village Record on July 28, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 10th inst. by the Rev. Jethro Johnson, Mr. JAMES BROWN to Miss ANNE HORTON.
  • Village Record on July 28, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 8th inst. by the Rev. Jethro Johnson, Mr. JOHN MOORE, to Miss MARY HARRIS.
  • Village Record on July 28, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 8th inst. by the Rev. Jethro Johnson, Mr. SETH PAINE, to Miss MARTHA CLARK.
  • Village Record on August 4, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Chester, on Tuesday, the 20th July, by the Reverend R.U. Morgan, SAMUEL EDWARDS, Esq. to Miss MARY ANN ENGLE – all of Chester, Delaware county.
  • Village Record on August 11, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By John Morgan, Esq., on the 2d inst. Mr. GEORGE SMITH, to Miss MARY GRIFFITH, both of Charlestown, Chester county.
  • Village Record on August 11, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By the Rev. Jethro Johnson, on the 15th ult., Mr. HUGH LEMON to Miss MARY BOYD, all of Chester county.
  • Village Record on August 11, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 22d ult. by Robert Buffington, Esq. Mr. LEVI JACKSON, to Miss LYDIA SMITH, both of Wilmington, Delaware.
  • Village Record on August 11, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 27th ult. by John Morgan, Esq. Mr. WM. PAWLING, to Miss REBECCA BUTLER, both of Montgomery county.
  • Village Record on August 11, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 5th ult., by Evan Evans, Esquire, JOHN JONES, (Tailor,) to GULY MEREDITH, both of East Nantmeal, Chester county.
  • Village Record on August 18, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Mill Bank, Delaware county, on the 31st ult. by Samuel Davis, Esq. Mr. PETER HILL, Merchant, of Philadelphia, to Miss HANNAH SELLERS, daughter of Nathan Sellers, Esq.
  • Village Record on August 18, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Philadelphia, on Tuesday, the 3d inst. by Joseph Watson, Esq. Mayor, Mr. CHALKLEY SOMERS, to Miss ELIZA McDONNELL, both of Wilmington, Delaware.
  • Village Record on August 18, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By William Everhart, Esq. on the 15th inst. Mr. JOHN CAIN, of Tredyffrin to Miss MARY EVERHART, of Charlestown.
  • Village Record on August 18, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By William Everhart, Esq. on the 19th inst. Mr. JONATHAN MILLISON, of West Goshen, to Miss SARAH B. FOX, of Westtown.
  • Village Record on August 18, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Tuesday, the 3d instant, by the Rev. Dr. Wiley, Mr. CHARLES BREWSTER, of Philadelphia, to Miss EUNICE BONSALL, of Upper Darby, Delaware county.
  • Village Record on September 8, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 25th ult. by Wm. Everhart, Esq. Mr. ASHER BALDWIN, of West Bradford, to Miss JANE NETHERY [?], of the same place.
  • Village Record on September 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By Richard Walker, Esq. on Thursday the 2d of September Mr. NOBLE MATHEWS to Miss EMMELA DISMAN, both of Chester county.
  • Village Record on September 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 8th inst. by the Rev. Robert White, Mr. GEORGE G. VAN AMBRINGE, of Philadelphia, to Miss ABBY ELLIS, of Wilmington, North Carolina.
  • Village Record on September 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 9th inst. by John Morgan, Esq. Mr. BENNEDICT MALIN, to Miss MARY HENRY, both of Montgomery county, Pa.
  • Village Record on September 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 9th inst. by John Morgan, Esq. Mr. ISAAC FREEMAN, to Miss CHARLOTTE COGGINS, both of Charlestown, Chester county.
  • Village Record on September 29, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Catskill, by the Rev. Mr. Prentiss, EDWIN CROSWELL, Esq. Editor of the Albany Argus, to Miss CATHARINE ADAMS, daughter of John Adams, Esq. We wish our brother Printer, much happiness.
  • Village Record on September 29, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Lancaster, (Pa.) on Thursday last, by the Rev. Mr. Ashmead, Mr. GUNNING BEDFORD, Editor of the Lancaster Intelligencer, to Miss ANN ELIZA DICKSON, daughter of the late William Dickson, Esq. of that city.
  • Village Record on October 6, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Harrisburg, on Tuesday the 14th inst. by the Rev. Wm. De Witt, JAMES A. MAHANY, Esq. of the county of Philadelphia, Councellor at Law, to Miss HANNAH FAHNESTOCK, daughter of Obed Fahnestock, Esq. of Harrisburg.
  • Village Record on October 13, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 21st ult. by the Rev. J.C. Clay, Mr. EDWARD ROBERTS, to Miss AMELIA CONWAY, both of Chester county.
  • Village Record on October 13, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 26th ult. by John Morgan, Esq. Mr. JOHN YERKES, to Miss JANE W. FOWLER, both of Montgomery county, Pa.
  • Village Record on November 3, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By the Rev. C. Moore, on the 21st inst., Mr. WILLIAM EACHUS to Miss SUSANNA MOSTELLER, both of East Nantmeal, Chester county.
  • Village Record on November 3, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By the Rev. C. Moore, on the 9th inst., Mr. CYRUS HOOPES, to Miss HANNAH FRAME, both of Birmingham, Delaware county.
  • Village Record on November 3, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 14th inst. by Townsend Lamborn, Esq. Mr. ELI McCANN, to Miss SARAH REID [?], all of Chester county.
  • Village Record on November 3, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 14th inst. by Townsend Lamborn, Esq. Mr. THOMAS FERRELL, to Miss HANNAH HOPKINS.
  • Village Record on November 10, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Hanover, York county, Mr. ELI LEWIS, Editor of the York Recorder, to Miss REBECCA FORNEY, daughter of the late Adam Forney of Hanover.
  • Village Record on November 10, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By William Everhart, Esq. on the 28th ult. Mr. PETER HATTEM, of Delaware county, to Miss MARTHA DILWORTH of Chester county.
  • Village Record on November 10, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 21st ult., by William Everhart, Esq. Mr. THOMAS WILLIAMSON, to Miss SUSANNA F. KUGLE, all of Delaware county.
  • Village Record on November 17, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 13th ult. at Friends’Meeting, Sandy Springs, Maryland, BENJAMIN HALLOWELL, late of Westtown B. School, to MARGARET FARQUHAR, of the above place.
  • Village Record on December 1, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Richmond, (U.C.) on the 1st inst. the Rev. JOHN BYRNE, Rector of that place, aged eighty four years, to Miss ANN EYNEUF, daughter of Mr. Eyneuf, late schoolmaster of Richmond, in the twelfth year of her age.
  • Village Record on December 1, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage By Wm. Everhart, Esq. on the 25th ult. Mr. ABIJAH PASSMORE, of Maryland, to Miss NAOMI YARNALL, of Delaware.
  • Village Record on December 1, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 16th inst. by the Rev. John S. Jenkins, Pastor of the Baptist Church, in the Great Valley, Mr. WILLIAM PEARSON, of Charlestown, Chester county, to Miss ANN DAVIS, of Radnor.
  • Village Record on December 1, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Tuesday evening the 23d ult. by the Rev. Wm. Hodgson, Mr. JOHN McGINLEY, to Miss CATHARINE DOWNS, all of this borough.
  • Village Record on December 8, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Bedford, on the 18th inst. by the Rev. Hebry Gerhart, Mr. THOMAS B. MILLER, late of Cumberland county, to Miss CHARLOTTE McDOWELL, daughter of Charles McDowell, Esq. editor of the Bedford Gazette.
  • Village Record on December 8, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 2d inst. by the Rev. Jacob M. Douglas, Mr. TRUSTON JACKSON, to Miss REBECCA H. CORNOG, all of Delaware county.
  • Village Record on December 15, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage At Concord, Delaware county, on the 9th inst. by David Marshall, Esq. JOHN C. CORBITT, Esq. at Cantwell Bridge, Delaware, to Miss HARRIET B. TRIMBLE, daughter of Joseph Trimble, of the former place.
  • Village Record on December 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 25th of November, by the Rev. Mr. Hoggs, of Philadelphia, Mr. ISAAC WORRELL, to Miss ABIGAIL WORRELL, all of Delaware county.
  • Village Record on December 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Thursday the 25th ult., by the Rev. William Latta, Mr. SAMUEL FETTERS, of Pikeland, to Miss MARY ACRE, of Vincent.
  • Village Record on December 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Thursday the 2d inst. by the Rev. Charles Moore, Mr. AMOS JOHNSON, of Pikeland, to Miss SARAH PENNYPACKER, of Vincent.
  • Village Record on December 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Thursday the 9th inst. by the Rev. Guildin, Mr. SAMUEL SHEARER, of Vincent, to Miss SUSAN DAVIS, of Pikeland.
  • Village Record on December 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Thursday the 9th inst. by the Rev. P. W. Geisenheiner, Mr. MICHAEL SLOANAKER, of Pikeland, to Miss MARGARET SMITH, of Charlestown.
  • Village Record on December 22, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Thursday, the 5th of November, by Mayor McVeigh, Esq. Mr. WILLIAM S. DAVIS, to Miss HANNAH V. GORDON, both of Charlestown, Chester county.
  • Village Record on December 29, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On the 9th instant, by the Reverend William Latta, Mr. JACOB RAWE, to Miss RACHEL DAVIS, both of Charlestown, Chester county.
  • Village Record on December 29, 1824 — Marriage — Marriage On Thursday the 2d instant, by the Reverend Mr. Guildin, Mr. HENRY CRISMAN, of Charlestown, to Miss ELIZABETH YEAGER, of Pikeland, both of Chester county.

Other

  • Village Record on January 14, 1824 — News — Disease THE SMALL-POX.- This dreadful malady is spreading from the city to the country. No person who has not had it, or been vacinated, is secure. A person came out of the city to Brandywine township, having the small-pox – from him it was communicated to one a few miles below the town; and from thence the infection is spreading. Several persons in a family in West Goshen, the township adjoining this, have had the disease; and on Wednesday last, one of the children was buried, having died with it. Another person whom we know, not far from this place, has come out of the city with the Small-Pox. In truth, the contagion is so widely diffused – that to the unprotected – There is no safety. But the means of safety are present; easy to be obtained – not expensive. Vaccination is the only safe means to secure yourselves and children. Experience has proved it to be more efficacious than inoculation. There is no pain – no sickness attending it. All the physicians in this place have the vacine matter…We earnestly recommend to active and benevolent men and women, in each township in Chester and Delaware, to step immediately forth in this matter – Now, emphatically now…
  • Village Record on May 19, 1824 — News — Biography …During the winter in which the British occupied Philadelphia, and the year which followed its evacuation, some alarm was created and kept up in the country, by the daring perpetrations of one Jim Fitz Patrick, a celebrated desperado of those times. Many anecdotes are still told of him. He was certainly a man of singular courage, and notwithstanding his conduct, and his disregard and violation of all the rules of social order, exhibited on many occasions some good points of character. With all his vices he was noble and generous, and though an outlaw, was not altogether vile and unprincipled. As I have lately learned something of him, I shall furnish you with a brief sketch of a short and desperate career – a notice by the way which I would not think of honoring him with, did I consider him a mere highwayman or common robber. The father of Fitz or Fitch, as he is familiarly called, was an Irishman in low circumstances, and bound his son when quite a lad to John Passmore, a reputable citizen of Chester county, to learn the trade of a blacksmith. Fitz behaved himself passably well during his apprenticeship, and worked faithfully at the anvil during his term of service, which did not expire till he was twenty one. While in his boyhood he practiced a good deal in athletic exercises in which he manifested great superiority. After leaving Passmore he worked only a short time at his trade; for the war breaking out, he exchanged his hammer for a musket and joined a body of militia then raising. He afterwards entered the flying camp, and accompanied it into New York; but hating subordination he soon grew tired of military service, and resolved to abandon it SANS CEREMONIE. Accordingly under cover of the night he left his companions, and leaping into the Hudson, swam to the opposite shore and effected his escape. Fitch one more his own man determined upon visiting his native county, and made his way across New Jersey to Philadelphia. There however, he was recognized and being apprehended as a deserter, was lodged forthwith in Walnut street prison. This was rough treatment for our young adventurer, and he resented it as a great indignity offered to his patriotism. He resolved to revenge it; but he must first make a shift to get out of his new abode. The walls were too strong for him, unprovided as he was with implements or perforation, and he had to look for other means of escape. These soon presented. Recruits for the American army were then much wanted, and eagerly sought after; and to Fitch the offer was made, of immediate release and indemnity for the past, on condition that he would enter the continental service. To this condition, he gladly acceded, and stept once more into open air. But, though not greatly averse to the hazards of a soldierlife, he had little notion of fighting for men who had temporarily deprived him of his liberty. He therefore embraced the first opportunity of deserting again, and roamed the country for some time, working for wages a few days in a place, and thus procuring for himself an honest livelihood. While engaged in this way Fitch was seized by two soldiers that were sent from Wilmington by an officer there, who had heard of his being a deserter, and whence he was employed. The soldiers set upon him unawares, while mowing, with other hands, in a meadow in Londongrove township, and took him before he could prepare to make any resistance. It was proposed to lead their prisoner directly to Wilmington; but at his entreaty the men were prevailed upon to go with him first to his mother, a few miles distant, to procure some clothes which he said he should want, in case of detention. When he reached the house attended by his guards, opening the door he grasped his rifle which stood behind it, and presenting the muzzle to the soldiers threatened to shoot them down, unless they would leave him instantly. They did not think it prudent to dare him to the execution of his threat. The men being gone, Fitch returned to his labor, and continued to pursue it as if nothing had happened. This tame kind of living however, did not well comport with the ardent temperament and restless spirit of Fitch. Besides, the whigs had injured him, and he longed for revenge. No sooner therefore had Howe landed at the head of the Elk, than Fitch repaired to his camp. He was afterwards present at the battle of Brandywine, and accompanied the British army to Philadelphia, where he continued during the greater part of the winter following, making occasional visits to his native county, and the country adjacent to the city, on predatory expeditions. For this kind of service he was peculiarly qualified, and of consequence a good deal employed by the British. (It is presumed that he was employed as an officer of inferior grade by Sir Wm. Howe, as he was universally called capt. Fitch wherever his name was spoken. Whether he was ever appointed to that office I doubt greatly, though without having any satisfactory information in regard to the fact.) In the summer of ‘while on an excursion of this nature, Philadelphia was abdicated by Howe, and our hero was left behind. This being the case he resolved to carry on the war himself, and fixed upon Chester county, as the scene of his operations. He accordingly commenced his depredations upon our more active whigs, and by a series of the most daring robberies, he became a terror to all who were distinguished by their zeal for the American cause. The tories he considered as his friends, and never molested them, but the collectors were the special objects of his vengeance, and all the public money which he could extort from them he looked upon as lawful prey. One of these men he not only plundered of a large sum of money, but took him, off to his cave in the woods, where he detained him two weeks to the great alarm of his family, who supposed him murdered. At another time, having fallen in with a couple of this same description of men armed with muskets, one of them began to boast that if he could only meet with Fitch, he should not escape them so easily as he had done some others. Fitch seizing his opportunity disarmed them both, and making himself known to them, despoiled the soldierly looking boaster of his cue, tied him to a tree and inflicted upon him a most severe chastisement. In this way he proceeded harassing the collectors, plundering them of the money they had gathered for the public service, and treating them when they fell into his hands in such a rude and merciless manner, as made him their continual dread. He was often pursued by whole companies of men, but always escaped them by his agility, or daunted them by his daring intrepidity. On one occasion fifty or more persons assembled well armed and resolved to take him if possible dead or alive. They coursed him for some hours over the hills, but becoming weary of the chase they called at a tavern to rest, and to procure some refreshments. -While sitting in the room together, and every one expressing his wish to meet with Fitch, suddenly to their great astonishment he presented himself before them with his rifle in his hand. He bade them all keep their seats, declaring that he would shoot the first man that moved. Then having called for a small glass of rum and drank it off, he walked backwards some paces with his rifle presented to the tavern door, and a distance at which he felt himself safe from his pursuers wheeled and took to his heels, leaving the stupefied company in silent amazement. Not long after this occurrence, another party of eighteen or twenty men was hunting him with guns and rifles upon the south valley hill. Stepping from behind a tree, he presented himself to one of the company that was separated a short distance from the rest, and asked him whom he was seeking. The man answered ‘Fitch.”Then’said Fitch with me and I will shew you his cave where you may find him.’After leading him some distance from his companions, Fitch told the fellow who he was, bade him ground arms, tied him to a tree, cut a wyth and flogged him severely. He then told him he might go and inform his comrades where to find the Fitch they were hunting. When they arrived at the place, Fitch was -no matters where – at least not there abouts. To ensure his capture a large premium was offered for the head of Fitz Patrick. This rather pleased him than otherwise, as it gave him the greater notoriety & shewed that his exploits had made him to be feared. He even became more active than before, plundering on one day in one part of the county, and setting the whole neighborhood into commotion, and the next appearing in the opposite section and producing there a similar effect; escaping the fleetest, daunting the boldest, and robbing those that were the most strongly armed and best prepared for his reception. Shortly after a price had been set upon his life, to shew him much he dared or how heartily he despised the cowardice of the multitude, armed with two pistols and a dagger, he deliberately walked in open day from the southern hill opposite Kennet Square, through a great company of people who made way for him, to Taylortavern, took a glass of grog and went away without molestation, though there were men present with arms and muskets in their hands. A man from Nottingham once in pursuit of Fitch, entered the house of his mother, behaved rudely and broke her spinning wheel. Fitch vowed revenge, and sent the fellow word that he would visit him shortly, and that he might prepare himself for the interview. The man swore that he would be glad to see him, and ventured to predict that if Fitch appeared he should give a good account of him. The robber kept his promises, and having met his motherinjurer at his own door, ordered him in a peremptory tone to follow him to the woods. The man had not the hardihood to disobey, but did as directed. Fitch then tied him to a tree and inflicted upon him his favorite punishment – a most sore flaggellation. Fitch was in many ways a remarkable man. He has a peculiar humor, which he frequently indulged at the expense of others. Even in his treatment of those whom he chose to punish, he often proceeded in such a manner as to render them the objects rather of ridicule than pity. He despised covetousness, and in all his depredations, was never known to rob a poor man. Indeed he often gave to the poor, what he took from the rich. It is related that while lurking in the neighborhood of Caln meeting house, he met with an old woman that followed the business of a trader, and was then on her way to the city with all her little stock of money to procure a new supply of goods. Not knowing the robber and but little expecting at that time the honor of his company, she made known to him her apprehension that as captain Fitch was in the neighborhood she might fall into his clutches, and be deprived of her whole fortune. Fitch after obtaining her secret, told her he was the man whom she so much dreaded, but that she might dismiss her fears as regarded him; for there was nothing he would disdain so much as to wrong a weak and defenceless woman; at the same time he drew from his pocket a purse containing several guineas, and presenting it to her, wished her a pleasant journey, and turned off into the woods. To particularize the many enterprises and adventures that are still related of this singular man – this real Rob Roy MacGreggor of our county – would swell my letter beyond all reasonable limits. During the year or more that he infested this part of the country he was extremely active, and was every day either plotting or achieving some new plan or mischief. He however never molested his tory friends, for having espoused the British interest, he considered the whigs only as his enemies and himself as a partisan chief at liberty by the laws of war to harass them in every possible manner. After he was proclaimed an outlaw, and a reward was offered for his head, marksmen were ambushed for him on every side, and he was hunted in all his haunts: but he was too nimble for pursuit and too wily to be ensneared. It is a vulgar saying that who is born to be hung will never be drowned,’and it seemed that the fate that reserved Fitch for the gallows rendered him perfectly invulnerable to lead. He was frequently shot at, both by his pursuers, and by persons who laid in wait for him by the road side, but he always escaped uninjured. So frequently indeed was he subjected to danger, that he not only became wholly reckless of it, but made it his sport and pleasure, and even took – strange delight in disappointing the exertions of his enemies by putting himself almost within their power, and the eluding their grasp by his wonderful dexterity. But this man who has daunted multitudes, and baffled so long the vigilance of his enemies, like Sampson was at length betrayed and taken by a woman. This Delila, upon whom the mercenary consideration of a bribe operated too strongly for her fidelity, was the mistress and confidant of Fitch, and was mainly dependent for the means of support upon his generosity. She then lived in a house near the Strasburg road, and a little beyond Crum creek, in a rather retired situation. Having taken the resolution to betray her lover, and knowing at what time to expect him, she made the requisite preparation for the accomplishment of her treacherous purpose. Armed men were concealed in closets to assist in securing him, and cordage to bind him was also provided. Fitch arrived according to appointment. The traitoress watching her opportunity seized him around the back and arms, while in the act of taking off his shoe buckles, and cried for assistance. The men rushed from their hiding places, secured his pistols which he had laid on the table, and bound the robber himself. He was conducted immediately to Chester where he was soon tried, condemned and executed; behaving throughout with a firmness worthy of a hero and consistent with the character he had sustained. Such was the inglorious life and ignominious death of James Fitz Patrick – a man that with a greater elevation of mind, and a nobler direction of his views, which proper education and culture would have given him, might have done deeds worthy of eulogy, and transmitted to posterity a grateful remembrance of his name – that had he lived in those iron times, when desperate valor was prized beyond every other virtue, might have occupied a conspicuous place in the annals of chivalry, and shone among his contemporaries VELUT INTER IGNES LUNA MINORES as the moon among the lesser luminaries of heaven… [Published as LETTER XX FOR THE RECORD]

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