liberator-1831-05-07

The Liberator: A Race for Liberty

William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator was a weekly abolitionist newspaper published in Boston. The paper held true to the founder’s ideals. Garrison was a journalistic crusader who advocated the immediate emancipation of all slaves and gained a national reputation for being one of the most radical of American abolitionists.

A Race for Liberty

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD — ‘Ranaway from the subscriber, living in Washington City, on the 1st day of June, a Negro man, named Vincent Scoot. He is twenty-one years old, five feet, six or eight inches high, straight and well formed; he is an excellent house servant, carriage driver, and ostler; he acted as a waiter to my son Lieut. Henry Stewart, five years, in the Western army. He has a scar on his right arm, near the elbow, and about two and a half inches in length, and half an inch wide.’

— A Southern Paper

The above scar was no doubt received in rescuing his master from death, or fighting in defense of his country’s liberties, who, with five years’ campaign, together with shedding his blood in sustaining the independence of his county, is denied the pleasure of running away to enjoy it, while the humane master, instead of rewarding him for his services— offers a reward for his apprehension as a slave. The above sketch, delineated by a skillful hand, would make a beautiful frontispiece to the literary works of every American writer of taste.

— African Sentinel

Source:  The Liberator, May 7, 1831

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