Port of Havana-Cover

Visiting the Port of Havana in 1856

The American going to Cuba for the first time anxiously watches for the first glimpse of the famed “gem of the Antilles.” The announcement of “land in sight,” calls him to the deck; presently there looms up upon the clear atmosphere, a number of snowy white spots, which rapidly gain solidity, and take shape.

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

First are made out the frowning walls of Moro Castle and Light House. To the right is the Punta, in front of which was executed the unfortunate Lopez. Beyond is the fortress of Cabana, one of the strongest in the world. Such are the individual peculiarities of our faithful picture of the entrance of the port of Havana.

Every vessel entering is telegraphed, and such houses as do not command a view of the Moro, reflect the signals by means of looking-glasses affixed to some lofty part of the premises.

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

In the central distance of the view is the fort of Aratas, where the fifty Americans under command of Crittenden, and attached to the Lopez expedition, were barbarously shot by the Havana authorities. To the left is the Prince’s fort, and below is the suburb of Jesse Maria.

Part of the harbor of Havana is shown, and on the right the view of a part of the city. The friends of Crittenden contemplate erecting a magnificent monument to his memory in front of the fort of Aratas, the moment the island is in possession of the United States.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
Source: Frank Leslies Weekly, February 9, 1856

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