Behind the Lines

Pictorial: Behind the Lines of our Allies (1917)

This photo feature appeared in the May 24, 1917 edition of Frank Leslie’s Weekly. Frank Leslie’s Weekly, later often known as Leslie’s Weekly, actually began life as Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. Founded in 1855 and continued until 1922, it was an American illustrated literary and news publication, and one of several started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. John Y. Foster was the first editor of the Weekly, which came out on Tuesdays. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.

The ancient and honorable artillery horse

The army horse its patience and reliability all are familiar. This caravan is bringing to the fighting line a supply of ammunition. Across each animal’s back are hung ammunition bags and each horse’s load is 8 shells, besides canteens and other needed things.  Since the Germans in their retreat destroyed all roads, the supplying of the troops falls upon horses and mules until motors and trains can again be used.

The ancient and honorable artillery horse.

Squirrel or Poilu?

Nature provided a snug Retreat for this French soldier. A hole in the base of a hollow tree is a small but Cozy home, warm, dry and safe or as safe as anything can be on the Battlefront. Reading his mail. The Ingenuity of soldiers and making trench life bearable as been entrusted by many photographs of unique devices, invented in necessity, as substitutes for the conveniences of home.

Squirrel or Poilu?

Squirrel or Poilu?

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.

Detecting Mine Operations

The delicate instrument which this French officer of the engineering corps is using is a microphone, which will detect the faintest sounds. With it, activities in the ground, within a wide range, are reproduced. It is possible to hear hostile mining parties digging and to know how far their work has progressed. When the sound stop the listener knows for mine has been planted and gives the alarm.

Detecting Mine Operations

Detecting Mine Operations

Only Desolation and Ruins in the Wake of the Retreating Germans

Devastated villages, burned bridges, and streets and roads made impassable by the barricades of ruined homes mark the route of the northward retreat of the German forces. One of the late important losses of the German was a city of Craonne, which fell before General Nivelle’s poilus.

The city was a vital point in the Hindenburg line and its fall seems to presage a German retreat towards the Franco-Belgian frontier. While the French are advancing from the south, the drive of the British continues and the Teutons are being pressed back on the territory they have held so long.

Only Desolation and Ruins in the Wake of the Retreating Germans

Only Desolation and Ruins in the Wake of the Retreating Germans

All images included in blog posts are from either Accessible Archives collections or out of copyright public sources unless otherwise noted. Common sources include the Library of Congress, The Flickr Commons, Wikimedia Commons, and other public archives.

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