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Webinar: Leisure and Sports in 19th Century America

Leisure and Sports in 19th Century America

Wednesday, July 13, 10:00am
Thursday, July 14, 2:00pm

With the spread of industrialization in the nineteenth century, American workers and families saw an increase in leisure time and more disposable income than they had ever enjoyed before. What did Americans do with this time and income? Participation in sports, leisure, and amusement activities multiplied. Utilizing a variety of Accessible Archives digital collections, this webinar will trace a variety of leisure activities and sports that dominated the 19th century.

Sign-up and checkout highlights on the evolution of baseball and other sports, vaudeville, recreational pursuits, and amusements. Specific topics include: “exercises prescribed for women,” “city amusements,” Christian law of recreation,” “work and play,” and many others.

The diverse primary source materials contained in Accessible Archives’ databases provide broad views across 200 years of American history and the culture of the 18th and 19th centuries through full-text searches and digital images. Accessible Archives collections permit users to spend more time exploring documents and less time searching for them.

Register Today


New Faceted Search Page Enhancements

Primary Sources at Your Fingertips!

New Intuitive Search Functionality!

 Explore America’s Past in a New Way with Accessible Archives’
New Faceted Search Page Enhancements

Want to find exceptionally exciting primary source materials in Accessible Archives collections?

These new enhancements will replicate the user experience that your patrons know well. Within the unique Accessible Archives primary source collections, students, faculty, and librarians will go beyond just the facts and figures of history and into a deeper understanding of their search topic.

The New Faceted Search Page enhancement allows users to spend more time exploring documents and less time searching for them!

New Faceted Search Page Enhancements

New Faceted Search Page Enhancements

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Accessible Archives Collections

Accessible Archives and University of Delaware Complete Partnership

Accessible Archives and University of Delaware Complete Partnership

New Agreement Will Enhance Research for Colored Conventions Project

Malvern, PA (May 24, 2016) — An agreement between Accessible Archives and the University of Delaware’s (UD) Colored Conventions Project (CCP) will allow the innovative use of Accessible Archives’ databases. These include African American Newspapers: The 19th Century, The Liberator and National Anti-Slavery Standard. Accessible Archives’ extension of its standard academic use license will expose those important materials, and additional collections, to the many visitors to the CCP website.

The CCP is a digital collection and teaching website used by students, community scholars and professors across the globe.  This agreement allows CCP, along with the project’s national teaching partners and the thousands of students who engage in original research through CCP’s curriculum, to present images from Accessible Archives’ databases on its ColoredConventions.org website. The agreement was coordinated by Unlimited Priorities LLC, the exclusive sales and marketing representative for Accessible Archives.

The CCP, which brings 19th-century Black organizing to digital life, is pleased to partner with Accessible Archives and to celebrate the company’s long history of productive partnerships with UD”, said P. Gabrielle Foreman, the project’s faculty director and Ned B. Allen Professor of English and professor of history and Black American studies at UD. “The historic Colored Conventions were symbiotically connected with many of the 19th-century African American newspapers offered by Accessible Archives, so this agreement will be a great boon for Colored Conventions’ many users.”

Ann Ardis, UD’s senior vice provost for graduate and professional education and director of the Interdisciplinary Humanities Research Center, which provided CCP with its first funding, also praised the agreement. “We are thrilled that Accessible Archives will play such a pivotal role in our public humanities outreach to share this rich chapter of African American history,” Ardis said. “With the help of Accessible Archives, the Colored Conventions Project will add greatly to contemporary understandings of the long history of African American struggles for racial justice.”

Iris L. Hanney, Unlimited Priorities president, responded: “Unlimited Priorities specializes in creating partnerships that provide researchers with better access to relevant content.  As the goals of Accessible Archives and University of Delaware were totally in synch, this agreement will benefit the entire information community.”

About Accessible Archives, Inc.

Accessible Archives utilizes a team of digital technology and conversion specialists to provide vast quantities of archived historical information previously available only in microform, hard copy or as images only. Databases containing diverse primary source materials – leading books, newspapers and periodicals – reflect broad views across 18th and 19th century American. Accessible Archives will continue to add titles covering important topics and time periods to assist scholars and students at all academic levels. Unlimited Priorities LLC is the exclusive sales and marketing agent for Accessible Archives.

About Unlimited Priorities LLC

Unlimited Priorities LLC utilizes its highly skilled group of professionals to provide a variety of support services to small and medium-sized companies in the information industry. The Archival Initiatives Division (AID) offers practical consultative services to libraries, historical societies and associations. AID provides advice and assistance in archival content selection, rights ownership, project management, workflow analysis, production, distribution of converted content and interaction with commercial entities. We recognize that each location or organization is unique, requiring customized and locally-based solutions. By coordinating a library’s project requirements with commercial firms’ interests, Unlimited Priorities creates an atmosphere of mutual cooperation while organizing a successful process at a reasonable cost.

Contacts:

Iris L. Hanney, President
Unlimited Priorities LLC
239-549-2384
iris.hanney@unlimitedpriorities.com
www.unlimitedpriorities.com
Peter Stevens
Unlimited Priorities LLC
Marketing and Sales for Accessible Archives
215-947-0282
peter.stevens@unlimitedpriorities.com
www.unlimitedpriorities.com

Franks

February 2016 Webinar Schedule

This month we are hosting three free webinars on two topics:

Frank Leslie’s Weekly

February 17th, Wednesday, 10am EST
February 18th, Thursday, 1pm EST

This 30-minute webinar will trace America’s development in the 19th and early 20th centuries through this complete collection of the nation’s first illustrated weekly. It will highlight every phase of the evolution of American popular culture over 70 years. In addition, the webinar will illustrate how the Weekly chronicles the nation heading into the catastrophic conflict between North and South, postwar industrial growth and the rise of cities, and the movement westward. By unlocking the immediate past scholars can better understand the events leading to our present day concerns and issues.

Register Now

Use of Primary Sources and Interface/Searchability

February 24th, Wednesday, 10am EST

This 30-minute presentation will focus on the importance of using primary sources and how to locate those documents that will provide the best opportunities for reference librarians, faculty and students to “dig into the past” and discover the essential history that defines our society.

Register Now


slaves-plantation

Slave’s labor pays the Preacher (1831)

The following (says the Trumpet) is an extract of a letter from a gentleman of high standing in South Carolina. It needs no comment.

‘While I was at Prince Edward Court House in Virginia, I learnt there was a Presbyterian Society at that place, which owned a gang of Negroes, perhaps 30 or 40 – these are hired out from year to year, and the proceeds of their labor pays the Preacher. What do you Yankees think of this?’

William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator was a weekly abolitionist newspaper published in Boston. The paper held true to the founder’s ideals. Garrison was a journalistic crusader who advocated the immediate emancipation of all slaves and gained a national reputation for being one of the most radical of American abolitionists.

Source: The Liberator, April 2, 1891