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NC-1780_1

Arming Slaves: Gov. Josiah Martin’s Denial

Lieutenant-Colonel Josiah Martin (23 April 1737 – 13 April 1786) was the last Royal Governor of the Province of North Carolina (1771–1775). Martin was born in Dublin, Ireland, of a planter family well established on the Caribbean island of Antigua, third son of his father’s second marriage. His elder half-brother Samuel Martin (1714–1788) was secretary to the Treasury in London. Another brother Sir Henry Martin (1735–1794) was for many years naval commissioner at Portsmouth and Comptroller of the Royal Navy. Sir Henry was father of Thomas Byam Martin.

The following letter was wrote by his excellency governor Josiah Martin, to the honourable Lewis Henry De Rossett, esquire, in answer to an information given him of his having been charged with giving encouragement to the slaves to revolt from their masters. As the substance of this letter is truly alarming, his excellency therein publicly avowing the measure of arming the slaves against their masters, when every other means to preserve the king’s government should prove ineffectual, the committee have ordered the said letter to be published, as an alarm to the people of this province, against the horrid and barbarous designs of the enemies, not only to their internal peace and safety, but to their lives, liberties, properties, and every other human blessing.

Fort Johnston, June 24, 1775

Sir,

Royal Governor Josiah Martin

I beg leave to make you my acknowledgements for your communication of the false, malicious, and scandalous report, that has been propagated of me in this part of the province, of my having given encouragement to the negroes to revolt against their masters; and as I persuade myself you kindly intended thereby to give me an opportunity to refuse so infamous a charge, I eagerly embrace this occasion most solemnly to assure you that I have never conceived a thought of that nature. And I will further add my opinion, that nothing could ever justify the design falsely imputed to me, of giving encouragement to the negroes, but the actual and declared rebellion of the king’s subjects, and the failure of all other means to maintain the king’s government.

Permit me, therefore, sir, to request the favour of you to take the most effectual means to prevent the circulation of this most cruel slander, and to assure every body with whom you shall communicate on this subject, that so far from entertaining so horrid a design, I shall be ever ready and heartily disposed to concur in any measures that may be consistent with prudence, to keep the negroes in order and subjection, and for the maintenance of peace and good order throughout the province. I am, with great respect, sir, your most obedient humble servant,

Jo. Martin

Published weekly in Williamsburg, Virginia between 1736 and 1780, The Virginia Gazette contained news covering all of Virginia and also included information from other colonies, Scotland, England and additional countries. The paper appeared in three competing versions from a succession of publishers over the years, some published concurrently, and all under the same title.

Source:  The Virginia Gazette, August 31, 1775

In July 1775, a plot instigated by Martin to arm the slaves was discovered. In retaliation, John Ashe led a group of colonists against Fort Johnston on 20 July. Martin was forced to flee aboard the Cruiser while the colonists destroyed the fort. Martin remained off the coast of North Carolina, directing the rising of the Loyalists, whom he supplied with weapons brought from England.

After two attempted invasions during the Carolina campaign to re-establish his administration were turned back, Martin, who was then in ill health due to fatigue, left for Long Island and then England.

He died in London. He is the namesake of Martin County, North Carolina.[


stained-glass

Universal Suffrage and an Earnest Zeal for the Right

Sarah A. Talbot’s letter was published in The Revolution on November 4, 1871, almost fifty years before women won the right to vote throughout the country.

To the Editor of the Revolution:

What the cause of Universal Suffrage most needs, is the co-operation of both sexes to improve the condition of humanity everywhere by manifesting an earnest zeal for the right, and a strong determination to oppose wrong in all its forms. The ministration of good women is needed in our jails and asylums. Their influence is particularly required in the temperance cause and in the cure of the social evil.

I sometimes ask myself will the women of America, when admitted to the ballot, have the courage to attack these monster evils? When I heard Susan B. Anthony hissed while in the act of uttering wholesome but unpalatable truths to a Sin Francisco audience, I realized as never before what the women of this land might expect if they dared attack the evils of society! 

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Elizabeth Cady Stanton on Slavery in America

This speech was given during the Twenty-seventh Anniversary of the American Anti-Slavery Society at the Cooper Institute in 1860. The large hall was well filled at the commencement of the exercises, and before the close of the session the number was largely increased, the hall being nearly full.

Mrs. Stanton, on rising, was greeted with loud and hearty applause. She read the following resolution, as containing the thought which she was anxious to urge upon the attention of those whom she was about to address.

Resolved, That the crowning excellence and glory of the anti-slavery enterprise is that, while its first grand design is the redemption of the Ethiopian of the South from chattel bondage, it is also, through the genius and power of Eternal Truth, liberating and elevating universal humanity above all the behests of custom, creed, conventionalism or constitution, wherever they usurp unrighteous authority over the individual soul; and thus, while our first care is the emancipation of the Southern slave, we are, under the Divine economy, at the same time working out our own salvation, and hastening the triumph of Love and Liberty over all forms of oppression and cruelty, throughout the earth.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s Address (Abridged)

MR. PRESIDENT, AND GENTLEMEN AND LADIES: This is generally known as the platform of one idea—that is negro slavery. In a certain sense this may be true, but the most casual observation of this whole anti-slavery movement, of your lives, conventions, public speeches and journals, shows this one idea to be a great humanitarian one. The motto of your leading organ, “The world is my country and all mankind my countrymen,” proclaims the magnitude and universality of this one idea, which takes in the whole human family, irrespective of nation, color, caste or sex, with all their interests, temporal and spiritual—a question of religion, philanthropy, political economy, commerce, education and social life, on which depends the very existence of this republic, of the state, of the family, the sacredness of the lives and property of Northern freemen, the holiness of the marriage relation, and the perpetuity of the Christian religion. Such are the various phases of the question you are wont to debate in your conventions.

But in settling the question of the negro’s rights, we find out the exact limits of our own, for rights never clash or interfere; and where no individual in a community is denied his rights, the mass are the more perfectly protected in theirs; for whenever any class is subject to fraud or injustice, it shows that the spirit of tyranny is at work, and no one can tell where or how or when the infection will spread. The health of the body politic depends on the sound condition of every member. Let but the finest nerve or weakest muscle be diseased, and the whole man suffers; just so the humblest and most ignorant citizen cannot be denied his rights without deranging the whole system of government.

National Anti-Slavery Standard was the official weekly newspaper of the American Anti-Slavery Society, an abolitionist society founded in 1833 by William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan to spread their movement across the nation with printed materials. Frederick Douglass was a key leader of this society and often addressed meetings at its New York City headquarters.
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How a Women Should Travel Abroad

This guide to traveling abroad was written for women traveling from the United States to Europe and appeared in Godey’s Lady’s Book in May of 1892.

by Augusta Salisbury Prescott

The first time one goes abroad, one spends nearly all the time regretting that things were not done differently. The second time there are only about half as many regrets, and the third time the journey may be said to be a triumphant one, for all previous mistakes are rectified and the whole trips accomplished without waste of time, money, patience or any of those things that one hates to expend needlessly.

Now it is impossible to tell anyone who has ever been abroad, just exactly how to go and what to do so as to avoid being swindled by railroad porters, steamship stewards and other dignitaries who preside over the grand steamboats and cars which are the vehicles to take one from one country to another.

But it is possible to give so many hints and suggestions that one half of all the pitfalls are laid open to notice, and so the novice who is going abroad for the first-time may safely put herself under the second class of people who have been abroad once and who know something about it and yet who have not learned everything.

Now let the novice take heed and notice each and all of the things suggested, in order that she may arrive at a jump at the knowledge which it costs many people a great many dollars and a great deal of time to learn.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

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Inside the Archives – Spring 2016 – Volume V Number 2

Inside the Archives

Spring 2016
Volume V. Number 2.


Welcome to Spring 2016!  We hope the wrap-up of your academic year is going well!

2016 is proving to be a great year for Accessible Archives!  We are adding new content to our acclaimed American County Histories database. We are developing and acquiring content for several new database products for Fall 2016! Stay tuned for more details as we firm up the publishing and content load schedules for these new databases. 

Accessible Archives is committed to enhancing the user experience and searchability of our databases. The latest enhancements are described later in this newsletter.

Annual ALA Conference in Orlando

Will you be at ALA in Orlando?  Lots of new and exciting things are going on at Accessible Archives and we would love to get together and share the news.  We are in booth 612.  Let us know and we will make a date!

The Colored Conventions Project

Colored Conventions“The Colored Conventions Project is delighted beyond measure to have an agreement with Accessible Archives; it remains the most popular site for searches for the more than a twelve hundred students across the country who have used CCP’s curriculum. We have national teaching partners in Ohio and California creating exhibits now which will feature images from the database—and many more coming on this year as UD graduate students partner with scholars whose essays will appear in our forthcoming collection Colored Conventions in the Nineteenth Century and the Digital Age. Indeed, we just got a highly sought after NEH grant to facilitate the creation of 15 exhibits. So this agreement could not be better timed! “

Visit the Colored Conventions webpage.

One hundred years ago, America was on the road to electing a new president. In 1916, presidential campaigns and voters addressed many of the same issues that we are seeing in 2016. These issues include: serious internal divisions within the Republican Party, concerns regarding the economy (in 2016, there have been rumblings that a recession is possible), and concern over America’s position in a spreading worldwide conflict (in 1916 it was the Great War and in 2016 it’s the War on Terrorism and the conflicts in the Middle East). Check out more on America’s political cultural development and the challenges of selecting a President in Frank Leslie’s Weekly.

MOBIUS and Accessible Archives Join Forces

MOBIUS and Unlimited Priorities, the sales and marketing agent for Accessible Archives, have signed an agreement to bring to the MOBIUS member libraries rich online databases that allow students and scholars to access essential primary sources. Working with member libraries in Missouri and Oklahoma, MOBIUS is the preferred gateway to the global information environment and the challenges of ever-changing technology for over 70 academic, public, and special libraries.

Congratulations to Avila University!!  They are the first of many MOBIUS member libraries to purchase an Accessible Archives subscription, which includes access to all 24 Accessible Archives databases, monthly content additions, and new databases released during the term of their subscription.

Check with MOBIUS for the Accessible Archives sales promotion for member libraries!

New MARC Records Available

There are now American County Histories MARC records for books from every state. In total, there are now 1600 of the soon to be 3000 records available. The records are provided three ways – as complete sets, as only new records, and as only corrected records. As always, for each set you can download either a zip file that has one file with all MARC records or a zip file that has one file for each collection. The MARC FTP link can be found on your organization’s Accessible Archives Administrators/Account Information Page.

Accessible Archives — Search Enhancements

Accessible Archives is excited to provide additional updates on the continuing enhancements we have made to the searching functionality on our website.

Hovering over “Help” in the Search screen – a drop-down menu provides links to the relevant sections of the User Manual on the Tech Support page. Each link provides essential assistance/explanation prior to the user actually searching.

Search Enhancements - Figure 1

Search Enhancements – Figure 1

Hovering over “Help” on the Results Page — a dropdown menu provides links to the relevant sections of the User Manual on the Tech Support page. Each link provides essential assistance/explanation on viewing the results of your search, viewing and browsing documents, and printing, and emailing a document.

Search Enhancements - Figure 2

Search Enhancements – Figure 2

The link on display pages has been changed from “Search” to “Revise Search”.

Search Enhancements - Figure 3

Search Enhancements – Figure 3

In the decade following the end of the Civil War, a great many former abolitionists turned their attention to the question of political equality for women. A recurring theme that held the public’s attention all the way through the 20th century, when women finally succeeded in gaining voting rights nationally, was the idea that men and women had “natural” roles and “spheres” of influence and that tampering with the system would result in chaos or the destruction of the existing way of life.

Questions of Importance

“Two questions are now stirring public thought. That men are not women, and women are not men, will, we think, be admitted by the warmest advocates of extremes on either side. Then, however equal in ability and worth the sexes may be, there must be some difference in their offices and their daily employments…”

Learn more about Godey’s Lady’s Book (1830–1898)

Upcoming Webinars

We will be conducting a series of collection-specific webinars during the coming months.

Newspapers of Colonial America

The newspapers comprising this webinar contain a wealth of information on colonial and early American History and genealogy, and provides an accurate glimpse of life in America, with additional coverage of events in Europe. Includes: The Pennsylvania Gazette, 1728-1800 (with the Pennsylvania Packet and Maryland Gazette); South Carolina Newspapers, 1732-1780 (The South Carolina Gazette, 1732–1775; The South Carolina & American General Gazette, 1764–1775; The South Carolina Gazette & Country Journal, 1765–1775; The Gazette of the State of South-Carolina, 1777–1780); and, Virginia Gazette, 1736-1780.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly

We will trace America’s development in the 19th and early 20th centuries through this complete collection of the nation’s first illustrated weekly. We will highlight every phase of the evolution of American popular culture over 70 years. In addition, we will illustrate how the Weekly chronicles the nation heading into the catastrophic conflict between North and South, postwar industrial growth and the rise of cities, and the movement westward. By unlocking the immediate past scholars can better understand the events leading to our present day concerns and issues.

In support of Canada’s Women’s History in October — Women’s Studies Collections

These collections comprise a unique selection of 19th Century women’s newspapers and periodicals whose diverse views helped define the roles of women in society, government and business.  They offer the opportunity to interpret social, political, economic, and literary matters during the 19th Century. Domesticity columns, suffrage and anti-suffrage writings, and literary genres are discussed, along with the ability of reference librarians, faculty, and students to assess the connotations of letters to the editors, news stories, articles on society and morality, essays, poems and short stories. Special focus will be on Canada.

African American Newspapers: 19th Century

This unique collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day, including the Mexican War, Presidential and Congressional addresses, Congressional abstracts, business and commodity markets, the humanities, world travel and religion. The collection also provides a great number of early biographies, vital statistics, essays and editorials, poetry and prose, and advertisements all of which embody the African-American experience.

Use of Primary Sources and Interface/Searchability

These presentations will focus on the importance of using primary sources and how to locate those documents that will provide the best opportunities for reference librarians, faculty and students to “dig into the past” and discover the essential history that defines our society.

Accessible Archives’ Library Support Services

Many of you may have taken advantage of some of the Accessible Archives free services listed below, but we wanted to bring you up-to-date on all of our available support services. These free services will promote and increase the usability of your organization’s Accessible Archives holdings and enhance the user experience.

Most of the services listed below can be accessed through the “Account Information” link in the upper right-hand corner of the Accessible Archives search page. Your COUNTER User ID and password can be used to access your full Account Information. This link will take you to an administration page, which includes specific information on: customer ID, type of service, and annual term; Branding information; IP authentication entries; content access rights; the COUNTER sign-in link; and the MARC FTP link.

Who and What is being searched?

Accessible Archives understands that usage numbers are critical in analyzing and justifying ongoing expenses. We have made available two resources through our partner, Scholarly iQ, to provide you with the most current usage statistics.

COUNTER: You now have access to COUNTER 4. This will provide you with an opportunity to review your organization’s usage statistics on a regular basis. To access your COUNTER usage information, click on the Account Information link in the upper right-hand corner of the Accessible Archives search page and it will take you to the Administrator Log-in page. Type-in your user ID and password for access. On the Administrator site, you can see the COUNTER link in the upper right corner. If you don’t have your COUNTER password, please contact us at 239-549-2384 or iris.hanney@unlimitedpriorities.com.

SUSHI: We have implemented SUSHI into our statistics system as part of our compliance with COUNTER 4, allowing you to automate your statistical gathering process.  We also work with ExLibris, Serial Solutions and EBSCO on providing SUSHI.

Promote your library’s acquisitions effort

BRANDING: Accessible Archives has a simple and user-friendly branding process that promotes the library and increases usage.

The top of the welcome screen will consist of a column for your logo, another for your greeting, and a third with an Accessible  logo and a brief note that the service is being provided via Accessible Archives.  The bottom of the screen will provide a selection list, and users will be able to select any combination of the resources to which you have purchased access.  We need two things from you to set up Branding – a logo file and a Greeting Message that will appear at the top of the page to the right of the logo.  We can accept either a .gif, .png or .jpg file.  The logo should not exceed 100 pixels in height or 300 pixels in width.  The greeting should be anywhere from 2 to 5 lines.

Searchability and Discovery

MARC: Accessible Archives can provide your library with customized MARC records. Our FTP site provides a convenient way of retrieving the latest updated records.  A user-friendly process allows users to follow a URL link directly to a publication or collection title for searching or browsing.

DISCOVERY: Accessible Archives currently has strategic alliances with EBSCO Discovery Service, ExLibris Primo Central, OCLC WorldCat, Ship Index and ProQuest Serials Solutions Summon.

When there are questions — Library and User Support

TECH SUPPORT WEB PAGE: Accessible Archives provides you with on-demand tech support at http://www.accessible-archives.com/support/. This web page provides a user manual that highlights all aspects of searching in your new product, direct links to our services, a detailed FAQ, and telephone number for access to a live contact for immediate attention

WEBINARS: We continue to offer free Webinars on a monthly basis.  If you are interested in learning more about our collections watch your e-mail for upcoming dates and sign-up information.  We also can create a customized Webinar for you and your staff geared to your specific collections.

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