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chapel

Presbyterians vs. Slavery in 1849

Some of the New School Synods and Presbyteries of the West, seem but little satisfied with the Assembly at Philadelphia.

Resolutions have been adopted by the Ottowa (Ill,) Presbytery recommending the exclusion of slave holders from the pulpit and the communion table – disapproving the course pursued by the General Assembly, and declaring the formal withdrawal of the Presbytery from that body.

And in the Synod of Illinois, a resolution was reported and discussed declaring slavery a sin, and the action of the late General Assembly in reference to this matter so unsatisfactory, that the Synod of Illinois ought publicly and solemnly to separate itself from that body.

After much discussion, the original proposition was modified by the substitution of the declaration – That, while they feel very anxious to be delivered from all participation in the sin of slavery, they do not feel, at present, willing to be separated from the General Assembly.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source: The North Star, December 14, 1849

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albany-georgia.j2_1

A Look Inside: History and Reminiscences of Dougherty County Georgia

This volume can be found in the Georgia section of our American County Histories: The Southeast collection. It was produced and distributed by members of the Thronateeska Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution from Albany, Georgia in 1924.

Dedication

In loving memory this volume is dedicated to MRS. LOUISA BACON STROTHER, Organizing Regent of Thronateeska Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution.

Preface

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, which is the largest patriotic organization in the world, has for one of its many worthy objects the preservation of the records of our great country as a whole by recording the history of each county, these county histories to be deposited with the Compiler of Records of each state or published in book form, thus preserving for all time valuable information which otherwise would be lost.

Nelson Tift

Nelson Tift

The members of Thronateeska Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, in compliance with this request from the national organization, have for the last five years been collecting the data contained in this volume, and now, having exhausted all known sources of information relative to the affairs of our county from the time of the red man down to the present, we beg to present the “History and Reminiscences of Dougherty County“ to our fellow citizens in the earnest hope that it may meet with their approval.

The compilation of this work has been a great and unremunerated task. It was not undertaken or pursued with the idea of gain, but purely from a patriotic desire to trace the threads of local events that have long been relegated to the chambers of the Past; to separate the tangled skeins, and to weave them into a story which shall proclaim to the world the deeds of a great people.

In a work of this kind, in spite of our most careful attention, some errors may reasonably be expected. We anticipate that the reading of these pages by many of our citizens with whom we have not been able to confer will bring to light still further information. And again, many of our good people who have shared in the upbuilding of our city and county may justly feel that they should have been included in the roll call of constructive citizens. In this we must acknowledge our shortcoming and plead only that the lack of space has prevented the mention of others than those who have been most prominently identified with the county’s progress, from the viewpoint of long residence and conspicuous service.

(more…)

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home-library

Tips on Building a Household Library (1838)

In order to obtain a good library, which every family ought to have, the following directions may be observed with advantage:

  • Select a room, or at least a corner of some room, where the Bible and other books, together with inkstand and paper, shall be kept. Every house ought to have a room for retirement, prayer and study.
  • Obtain a good, convenient book case, and writing table or desk, or both. Let the dust be brushed off, daily used, and kept constantly neat and clean.
  • Whenever a book has been taken into another room for use, let it always be returned to the library for safe keeping.
  • Avoid subscribing for books, unless you feel that the book cannot be published without a subscription, and you do it either as an act of benevolence to the author, or for the purpose of doing good to the world.
  • Lay out your money carefully. Buy no books but good ones. Select the best. Seek to make, from month to month, some increase to the library. Teach your children, servants and friends, to use the books with care.
  • Admit no novels.
  • Select, in addition to religious works, books of reference, school books, scientific works, and philosophical, etc. – a few of the best productions of the best poets.
  • In all departments, get works of established and solid reputation.


By pursuing this course a few years, every farmer and mechanic can have a library which will be of great value to his children, when he is gone, as well as to himself while living.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source

Collection: African American Newspapers
Publication: The Colored American
Date: July 7, 1838
Title: Household Libraries
Location: New York, New York

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washingtons-birthday-poster

Ohio Wins Washington’s Birthday Contest

These contest results appeared in the February 23, 1905 issue of Frank Leslie’s Weekly:

See the patriotic reverence in which the most famous American is held as shown in fine pictures by skilled amateur photographic artists.

(PRIZE-WINNER.) REPAIRING “OLD GLORY” FOR THE DECORATION OF WASHINGTON 'S PORTRAIT.— Will Helwig, Ohio .

(PRIZE-WINNER.) REPAIRING “OLD GLORY” FOR THE DECORATION OF WASHINGTON ‘S PORTRAIT.— Will Helwig, Ohio .

“SPEAKING A PIECE” ON THE FATHER OF HIS COUNTRY.   J. R. Iglick, New York .

“SPEAKING A PIECE” ON THE FATHER OF HIS COUNTRY.   J. R. Iglick, New York .

LITTLE ONES ADMIRING AN ARTISTIC TRIBUTE TO THE FIRST PRESIDENT.— J. J. Guild, Vermont .

LITTLE ONES ADMIRING AN ARTISTIC TRIBUTE TO THE FIRST PRESIDENT.— J. J. Guild, Vermont .

DOING HER BEST IN RECOGNITION OF THE DAY.— J. E. Boos, New York

DOING HER BEST IN RECOGNITION OF THE DAY.— J. E. Boos, New York

ADORNING WASHINGTON 'S PICTURE WITH FLAGS IN A WESTERN HOME.   Leslie Dunning, Minnesota .

ADORNING WASHINGTON ‘S PICTURE WITH FLAGS IN A WESTERN HOME.   Leslie Dunning, Minnesota .

“MISS AMERICA” AND HER “FILIPINO COUSIN” DECORATING THE PORTRAIT OF THE NATION'S FOUNDER.— Mrs. J. Townsend, New York .

“MISS AMERICA” AND HER “FILIPINO COUSIN” DECORATING THE PORTRAIT OF THE NATION’S FOUNDER.— Mrs. J. Townsend, New York .

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valentines

Some Valentine Games from 1914

By Kate Upson Clark

A correspondent asks for some games for Valentine ‘s Day . No doubt others may like a few suggestions for such games.

If you are entertaining children, suppose you cut out from stiff pink (or any color) paper a number of fairly good-sized hearts. Hide them around the room, as for thimble, or peanut parties. Divide the children into couples. Make the couple first finding and really touching a heart, the King and Queen of Hearts. That may be honor enough, if you have pretty pink crowns (with hearts and other decorations on them) for the fortunate two, or prizes may be given. In the order in which the hearts are found, the children may be duke and duchess, earl and lady, baron and baroness, etc. Have no more hearts than titles, and have coronets for each pair. A throne may be easily devised, and from that the king and queen may bestow the coronets (with or without prizes) as the hearts are found.

The dances for children’s parties should be the pretty, old-fashioned reels, contra-dances, quadrilles and so on, rather than the so-called modern “round dances.” Those old dances are far more interesting and graceful than these later ones. At any children’s party a photograph of the group may well be taken, since nothing pleases the children more. The sandwiches, cakes, ices, etc., should be heart-shaped.

For young men and maidens, try “Dear to the Heart.” Cut out from pink, white or red stiff paper, large hearts,—a foot or more long. A ribbon loop makes them easier to handle. Gather together many magazines and illustrated papers and several tubes of paste. (A towel, wet at one end, may well be provided also for each guest.) Put a guest’s name on each card. Those for the men might have a different color from those for the girls, though it is not necessary, if some distinctive mark is used on them. Mix them up, with the names down, and let each man draw a card having a girl’s name, and each girl draw a man’s card. Then let them cut from the magazines and papers pictures or bits of text suggesting the character, pursuits, fads and so on of the person whose name each card bears. A limit, such as twenty minutes or half-an-hour, may be set upon the time to be spent in decorating the cards.

It might be interesting to vote on the merits of the hearts when completed and examined, with prizes for the two or three or four best, and “booby” prizes accordingly. At the refreshment table a great “Cupid’s Cake” of favors may be piled in cake shape, a ribbon leading from each favor to a plate. At a certain time during the feast, each should pull his or her ribbon, and some pretty valentine or other appropriate favor will respond. This is a pretty game for clubs which are not too large.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, founded in 1855 and continued until 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.

Source: Frank Leslie’s Weekly — February 12, 1914

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