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Christmas_at_the_3rd_Northern_General_Hospital,_Sheffield,_1916_(9490957023)

Xmas to be Big Day in U.S. Army Hospitals (1919)

The War Department authorizes publication of the following from the Office of the Surgeon General:

Christmas in army hospitals will be a happy day for sick and wounded patients. A special Christmas dinner will be served and there will be other evidence of good in the form of decorations of winter greens, and in a number of cases there will be Christmas trees and special programs. Relatives and friends of the patients will not forget them in the matter of gifts. Every opportunity will be grasped in order to make the Christmas season this year as joyous and cheerful to the brave wounded men as it is possible to do.

At General Hospital No. 20, Whipple Harracks, Arizona, a Christmas tree will be provided for the patients at the Red Cross house on Christmas Eve. Christmas carols will be sung by the nurses and reconstruction aides in all the wards on Christmas morning. Local talent is arranging to entertain the patients at a good vaudeville show at the hospital, and a movie program for Christfas week is being arranged by the Red Cross. On Christmas day a party and dinner is being planned, to be attended by all patients and those on duty at the hospital.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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Superious

Man or Woman: Who is Superior?

Julia Crouch submitted this letter to The Revolution for the December 3, 1868 issue. The Revolution, a weekly women’s rights newspaper, was the official publication of the National Woman Suffrage Association formed by feminists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony to secure women’s enfranchisement through a federal constitutional amendment.

Who is Superior?

There are some persons who think that because there is a difference between man and woman, that one must be superior, that they cannot be equal. Can they not see that if a perfect orange is divided in the middle the parts will be equal?

Man and woman make a perfect whole. In God they are one, in Heaven they are neither male nor female; on earth they are male and female for the purpose of propagating the species. But if a difference in organization and temperament makes one superior, who shall say which is the superior? “Man has beard,” one says. But we have yet to learn that beard is expressive of sense and judgment: but if man has board, then we can say that woman has none, and therefore being different from man, have we not as much reason to say that she is superior, as for man to preach superiority on the same principle?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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soldiers at mail call [location and people unidentified] [Physical copy: 8"x10", b&w ; SIL-NPM file "No Neg # -- US Army Postal Service"; Other numbers: 232685; Other numbers:  SI Neg. # P-1382]

The Ten Commandments for World War I Mail Orderlies

From Afloat and Ashore to The Service Record, camp newspapers kept soldiers informed about the home front, political questions of the day – including those relating to the war itself – progress of their training, and the conducting of the war abroad. Also, they carried articles on what it was like to leave home by both recruits and draftees, the initial excitement of training, the drudgery of camp life, attitudes toward officers and fellow soldiers, the clash of arms, and news about the enemy. Camp personnel, places, and events are described with a richness that brings new credibility and perspective to scholarly research.

This little item ran in the April 26, 1919 issue of The 51ST Pioneers

Ten Commandments (for mail orderlies)

  1. Thou art a Mail Orderly, as such thou shalt serve thy buddies officiently, giving them the best service thou art capable of.
  2. Thou shalt not be the one responsible for the delay or nondelivery of mail for buddies both present and absent—past and present.
  3. Remember thou thy fellow soldier loveth his letters as thou loveth thine.
  4. Thou shalt search every record and endeavor to forward mail for those who are absent.
  5. Thou shalt have the TOP publish an order to obtain the addresses of those who are absent.
  6. Thou shalt cause all soldiers served by you who have lost the in mail to write to their former organization and to the Central Post Office.
  7. Thou shalt not return mail to the Central Post Office for soldiers who were in your company until thou hast exhausted every means to forward it to the addressee direct.
  8.  Thou shalt indorse all non-deliverable letters returned to the C. P. O. with the cause of non-delivery.
  9. Thou shalt keep a record or the addresses of all soldiers transferred from the company.
  10. Thou shalt above all be honest, faithful and give SERVICE, and treat all soldiers as thou wouldst have them treat you.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

Source: The 51ST Pioneers – April 26, 1919


WW1-Images

Accessible Archives Finalizes Imaging of American Military Camp Newspapers

Text Digitization on Pace for Early Completion

 Malvern, PA (November 17, 2017)Accessible Archives, Inc.®, an electronic publisher of full-text primary source historical databases, has announced that all images in the American Military Camp Newspapers component of its America and World War I series have been mounted on the website and that the XML-tagged text will be fully available early in 2018.

1917 marks the one-hundredth anniversary of America’s entry into World War I. The arrival of American Expeditionary Forces in Europe helped turn the tide in favor of France and Britain, leading to an Allied victory over Germany and Austria in November, 1918. By the time of the armistice, more than 4 million Americans had served in the armed forces and 116,708 had lost their lives. While in-depth perspectives of actual combat are plentiful, information about the soldiers themselves prior to deployment is not so well known. A vast number of troops received their initial combat training in military camps, and camp newspapers chronicle their experiences.

American Military Camp Newspapers makes important original source material – much of it written by soldiers for soldiers – readily available for research and fresh interpretation of events pertaining to The Great War. These newspapers carried articles on what it was like to leave home by both recruits and draftees, the initial excitement of training, the drudgery of camp life, attitudes toward officers and fellow soldiers and ongoing news about the enemy. Also included were non-war related advertisements, poetry, short stories, memoirs, jokes and cartoons.  Photographs and sketches portrayed life in the various camps, on the home front and at the battlefields. Camp personnel, places, and events are described with a richness that brings new credibility and perspective to scholarly research.

As American Military Camp Newspapers enters its final completion stage we are pleased to offer generous pre-publication pricing, with an extra incentive for orders placed by the end of 2017.

There is truly not one part of the nation that was not touched by World War I. American Military Camp Newspapers provides the potential to remind people of the war’s far-reaching significance and perhaps uncover new stories about the American soldier’s experience that we have not yet heard.

About Accessible Archives, Inc.

Accessible Archives utilizes a team of digital technology and conversion specialists to provide vast quantities of archived historical information previously available only in microform, hard copy or as images only.  Databases containing diverse primary source materials – leading books, newspapers and periodicals – reflect broad views across 18th and 19th century America. Accessible Archives will continue to add titles covering important topics and time periods to assist scholars and students at all academic levels.

About Unlimited Priorities LLC

Unlimited Priorities LLC utilizes its highly skilled group of professionals to provide a variety of support services to small and medium-sized companies in the information industry.  The Archival Initiatives Division (AID) offers practical consultative services to libraries, historical societies and associations.  AID provides advice and assistance in archival content selection, rights ownership, project management, workflow analysis, production, distribution of converted content and interaction with commercial entities. By coordinating a library’s project requirements with commercial firms’ interests, Unlimited Priorities creates an atmosphere of mutual cooperation while organizing a successful process at a reasonable cost.

Unlimited Priorities LLC is the exclusive sales and marketing agent for Accessible Archives,

Contacts

Iris L. Hanney, President
Unlimited Priorities LLC
239-549-2384
iris.hanney@unlimitedpriorities.com
www.unlimitedpriorities.com
Bob Lester
Unlimited Priorities LLC
203-527-3739
robert.lester@unlimitedpriorities.com
www.accessible-archives.com

 


mother sermon

A Short Sermon for Parents (1850)

It is said that when the mother of Washington was asked how she had formed the character of her son, she replied that she had early endeavored to teach him three things; obedience, diligence, and truth. No better advice can be given by any parent.

Teach your children to obey. Let it be the first lesson. You can hardly begin to soon. It requires constant care to keep up the habit of obedience, and especially to do it in such a way as not to break down the strength of the child’s character.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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