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women-working

Do Women Ever Do Any Hard Work?

It is a very common saying by many persons who are opposed to the Woman’s Rights question, that the women never claim the right to do any of the hard and laborious work; all they want is the right to do any of the easy kind, and leave the hard work for the men to do.

But such is not the fact; and if such objectors would take a journey into Europe they would find that the women did their share of hard work as well as men, particularly in Germany and France. Also in England, go into the harvest fields, and you will find the women reaping down the wheat, all day long, and receiving the same wages as the men; go into the hay fields and the women are there; look into the fields of barley, beans, oats, peas and turnips, and the women are there; ’tis true they don’t do any of the mowing, but they perform various sorts of labor there, the like of which is seldom seen in this country; to be sure a great deal of it is of a very healthy character, and has a beneficial effect upon the constitution.

You will find the women in all the large Gardens, Shrubberies and Orchards at work; and in the Dairies, there they are, milking the cows, and making the butter and cheese.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Inside the Archives – Summer 2016 – Volume V Number 3

Inside the Archives

Summer 2016
Volume V. Number 3.

Welcome to the Summer 2016 edition!  We hope you have enjoyed the downtime!

The new school year is about to begin!

2016 continues to be a great year for Accessible Archives and You! Just in time for the new school year, Accessible Archives is pleased to announce the release of our new faceted search page – see the details below! Accessible Archives is committed to enhancing the user experience and searchability of our databases. (more…)


Announcing: Faceted Search Page Enhancements

Explore America’s Past in a New Way with
Accessible Archives’ New Faceted Search Page Enhancements

AnnouncementMalvern, PA (August 15, 2016) – Students, faculty, librarians and general interest public now have the ability to drill down to more targeted results through search capabilities that narrow a broad results list or still page through an entire collection to uncover the depth and breadth of Accessible Archives’ historical collections.

We will be unveiling our new Faceted Search Screen on August 15, 2016, and it will dramatically enhance our users’ search experience.

These new enhancements will replicate the user experience that your patrons know well. Within the unique Accessible Archives primary source collections, students, genealogists, librarians, and researchers will go beyond just the facts and figures of history and into a deeper understanding of their search topic.

The New Faceted Search Page enhancement allows users to spend more time exploring documents and less time searching for them! (more…)


SC-Classified

South Carolina Classified

These classified ads ran in the August 12, 1778 issue of The Gazette of the State of South Carolina.

To be disposed of at private Sale, very reasonable – A Likely Negro Man, who has always been used to the field till these three years past, since whichtime he has been used to attend a single man, and sometimes to work out. He is sold no fault, the owner having no occasion for him. -Enquire of the Printers.

Twenty Pounds Reward – RUN away the subscriber, on the 27th ult.a dark Mulatto man named Sam, a Shoemaker by trade; he has a large bushy head of hair, is 5 feet six inches high, well set, and had on when he went away, a straw hat, a plaid Jacket, white breeches,and Oznabrugs shirt. It is supposed he is either harboured about Charlestown, or near Mr. Weston’s plantation in the parish of Christchurch. Whoever brings him to me, or to the Warden of the Work-house, shall be entitled to the above reward.

Our South Carolina Newspapers collection contains a wealth of information on colonial and early American History and genealogy, and provides an accurate glimpse of life in South Carolina and America in the 18th century.
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Women-1880

Strong Women Past and Present

The National Citizen and Ballot Box was a monthly journal deeply involved in the roots of the American feminist movement. It was owned and edited by Matilda Joslyn Gage, American women’s rights advocate, who helped to lead and publicize the suffrage movement in the United States.

This recurring segment highlighted the strength and influence of women in the past. This list is from the December 1880 issue.

Women Past and Present

ALLAQUIPPA was a celebrated savage queen residing near Pittsburg, Pa., before the Revolution. Washington is said to have called upon her when a young subaltern of the English army he was sent out to ascertain the designs of the French. Her name has been preserved in a countryseat near Pittsburg.

Miss Delia Bacon

Miss Delia Bacon

MISS DELIA BACON, a highly intellectual and eloquent woman, was the first to call in question the authorship of the plays ascribed to Shakspeare. Some twenty-five years ago she made her public appearance in Boston as a lecturer on history. Graceful and dignified in bearing, a fine reader and speaker, lecturing entirely without notes, she produced a marked impression in Boston and Cambridge. In course of her historical studies she became thoroughly convinced that Lord Bacon was the author of the plays attributed to Shakspear. In search of proof she visited England, remaining a year at St. Albans, where Lord Bacon lived in retirement, and where she supposed he wrote those matchless plays. She passed through many humiliations in behalf of her work, and poverty so great that she wrote in bed in order to keep warm, being unable to pay for fire. Hawthorne, then consul at Liverpool, helped her secure the publication of her book. It brought her a storm of abuse and adverse criticism, which following so closely upon her prolonged and exhausting literary labor, drove her insane. She was brought back to America where she soon died. But the theory she started as to the real authorship of Shakspeare’s plays, did not die with her. It has ever since continued to be the most interesting of all literary discussions; the authorship of the Junius letters pales before it. Miss Bacon, during her stay in England, wished, despite the curse, to open Shakspeare’s grave, believing she would there find the most convincing proof as to the authorship of these world renowned literary gems, but this she was not permitted to do. But the doubt she threw upon their Shakspearian authenticity is perennial. In the August Appleton’s Journal, Mr. Appleton Morgan, in a scholarly and convincing article, sustained Miss Bacon’s views. He deems it impossible that Shakspeare could have written the plays, and unhesitatingly ascribes their authorship, where Miss Bacon placed it, i. e., with Lord Francis Bacon.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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