Please help me to find her – Reconnecting Families After Slavery

Information Wanted Ads: Reconnecting Families After Slavery

As late as July 31, 1902, there were still formerly enslaved Americans using national newspapers in hopes of somehow reconnecting with the families shattered by slave owners before the end of the Civil War nearly 40 years before. These are a tiny sample of the requests in The Christian Recorder.

I was thinking about writing more about this phenomenon in post-Civil War America, but I feel that the messages, and the people asking for help, made themselves very clear.

INFORMATION WANTED

February 4, 1865 – Of John Pierson, son of Hannah Pierson. When last seen by his mother he was about 12 years of age, and resided in Alexandria, Va., Fairfax county, from which place his mother was sold to New Orleans, La., by one Alexander Saxton. Nine long and dreary years have passed away since his mother has seen him. Through the reverses of this war she has made her way to New Bedford, Mass., where she now resides. Her name is now Hannah Cole. Any information concerning him or his grandmother, Sophia Pierson, will be thankfully received by his anxious mother.

February 18, 1865 – INFORMATION WANTED – Mrs. Harriet Mayo, of Detroit, Michigan, wishes to make inquiry of Joseph Mayo, Richard Mayo, Aaron Mayo, and Lucy Mayo. The last she heard of them they were in Petersburg, Virginia. She now thinks they are some where within the lines of the Union army. Any one knowing of their whereabouts will please address MRS. MATILDA ROBINSON, No. 88 Mullet St., Detroit, Mich. (more…)

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Accessible Archives Year of Technology: Implementation of IPv6 Access

Malvern, PA (February 5, 2019)  Accessible Archives, Inc.®, a digital publisher of full-text primary source historical collections, announces that starting today access to their collections will be available via both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.  The addition of IPv6 promises a stronger, faster user experience!

In consultation with Accessible Archives customers, Unlimited Priorities — exclusive sales, marketing, and technology agent for Accessible Archives was made aware of the concern that the IPv4 addressing scheme was running out of potential addresses and schools were wanting to move toward IPv6 address usage.  Unlimited Priorities supervised the technology developments necessary to accommodate customers’ needs.

The IPv6 format was created to enable new IP addresses required to connect not only an ever-greater number of computing devices but also the rapidly expanding numbers of items with embedded connectivity.

Unlimited Priorities is coordinating the development, management, and implementation of a variety of initiatives in 2019.   Unlimited Priorities president, Iris L. Hanney, believes that  “implementation of IPv6 and additional developments in 2019 continues to highlight Accessible Archives’ ongoing commitment to serve the research community with the most up to date technology.”

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[Watch Now] Black History Month Webinar

If you missed our January 25th webinar, it is not too late.  You can watch it below.

About the Webinar:

Our African American Newspapers Collection provides important original source material—written by African Americans for African Americans—readily available for research and fresh interpretation by historians, educators, and students. In addition, The Liberator and the National Anti-Slavery Standard will be thoroughly discussed.

The event was hosted by Bob Lester, Product Development & Strategy Consultant, Unlimited Priorities, LLC

You can also download the PowerPoint slideshow.

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Post 2019-01-26

Ballots for Women: Giving or Forcing?

Members of the Massachusetts legislature, or of the legislatures of other states, who are urged to vote this winter for suffrage bills or amendments, should remember that what they are really asked to do is not to give the ballot to women, but to force it upon them.

That is what it really amounts to. The suffragists are admittedly a minority among women. As a matter of fact,—though this they do not admit—they are a small minority. Tested in any way one pleases,—by the membership of their organizations, by the signers to their petitions, or by the votes cast at school elections,—they are a small minority.

Actions speak louder than words. If the suffragists do not know that they are a small minority, why do they always bitterly oppose every proposal to submit the question to a referendum of women’s votes?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Free Webinar: African American Newspapers

Accessible Archives presents a look at a unique collection of African American newspapers in celebration of Black History Month on Friday, January 25, 2019 at 2:00pm ET!

Our African American Newspapers Collection provides important original source material—written by African Americans for African Americans—readily available for research and fresh interpretation by historians, educators, and students. In addition, The Liberator and the National Anti-Slavery Standard will be thoroughly discussed.

Hosted by Bob Lester, Product Development & Strategy Consultant, Unlimited Priorities, LLC

Register

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