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Top Ten Accessible Archives Blog Posts for 2016

These were the top ten blog posts in terms of popularity for 2016 on the Accessible Archives blog.

Accessible Archive’s diverse primary source materials reflecting broad views across American history and culture have been assembled into comprehensive databases. Developed by dedicated instructors and students of Americana, these databases allow access to the rich store of materials from leading American books, newspapers and periodicals.

The Political Power of Slave Masters (1848)

A Pro-Slavery Catechism

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Christmas 2012. Pudding supplied by photographer's grandmother.

Christmas Puddings from Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1870

Few cooks are agreed about this good old English dish, each one considering her way the best. We have carefully selected several recipes relating to these old-time puddings, from which our readers can make a selection. We know that they will have good reason to be satisfied with any of them.

Plum Pudding — Beat up four eggs well; add to them, firs, half a pint of new milk and a teaspoonful of salt. Then mix in half a pound of beef suet, chopped very fine, a pound of raisins stoned and chopped, a quarter of a pound of brown sugar, one nutmeg grated, one ounce of candied peel cut into thin small strips; stir all well together, and add another half pint of new milk; then beat in sufficient flour to make it a stiff paste, add a glass of brandy and a glass of white wine. Tie it up close, and boil it, if in a mold or basin, five hours; if in a cloth, four; but the pudding is better, as well as shapelier, when boiled in a shape or mold. For Sauce, make some good melted butter, put in some loaf-sugar, a glass of white wine, and a glass of brandy; make it boil up, pour half of it over the pudding, and serve the rest in a lot sauce-boat. This pudding may be made with the grated crumb of household bread as well as with four; it is better so if to be eaten cold. Plum puddings may be made a fortnight or longer before they are wanted, and will be all the mellower for the keeping, if hung up in a dry place where they will not mold. Christmas plum pudding is often served with a sprig of holly stuck in the middle; this makes a pretty garnish.

A Good Christmas Plum Pudding — The pride of English cookery is the plum pudding, which continental nations despise, because they can never succeed in making it eatable; we may therefore be excused in giving several receipts, all tried and approved, though of various degrees of excellence. With one pound of clean dry currants and half a pound of good raisins stoned mix one pound of bread-crumbs, half a pound of fine flour, and one pound and a half of finely-shred suet; add a quarter of a pound of sifted sugar, a grated nutmeg, a drachm of cinnamon, two cloves, and half a dozen almonds pounded, and an ounce each of candied orange and lemon sliced thin; mix all the materials thoroughly together in a bowl with a glass of brandy and one of sherry; then beat very well six eggs, and slowly stir in till all be well blended; cover the bowl, and let the mixture stand for twelve hours; then pour it in a pudding cloth, and tie it, not very tight; put it into boiling water, and keep up the boiling for six hours. Serve with sugar sifted over, and wine or punch sauce. Brandy is usually sent in with a Christmas pudding to be poured over the whole pudding, or over each slice, then lighted, and served in flames.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

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Frank Leslie - The Meaning of Christmas - Featured

The Meaning of Christmas

The holiday season is upon us! Schools will be closing shortly and students will be looking forward to some time with family and friends.  I can remember when I was a child that our last class assignment before the holidays was to write a paragraph on the meaning of Christmas. Most of the students in class focused on the toys and food, Santa Claus and his chimney escapade, and maybe the fact that we could play all day. But, there were always some students that wrote about other things – peace on earth, thankfulness for a good harvest, or religious views on the holiday.  When these students read their paragraphs out loud to the whole class, you could hear a pin drop. These are the memories that color our holidays. Make memories this holiday season for yourself and those around you. Have a safe and happy holiday.

Frank Leslie's Weekly - The Meaning of Christmas

Frank Leslie’s Weekly – The Meaning of Christmas

The article below from Frank Leslie’s Weekly asks that question that seems to surface this time of the year – “What is the meaning of Christmas?” This question appears several times in Frank Leslie’s and the articles provide a unique perspective on the meanings of Christmas. There are also a wide variety of articles on other aspects of the holiday, such as the Christmas tree, Santa Claus (and Saint Nicholas), toys, and the North Pole.

Students and researchers in American Studies and other academic disciplines will find a treasure trove of primary source information in Frank Leslie’s Weekly on holiday celebrations and their relationship to culture, and identity.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Farmer

Women Farmers in 1871

The Revolution, a weekly women’s rights newspaper, was the official publication of the National Woman Suffrage Association formed by feminists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony to secure women’s enfranchisement through a federal constitutional amendment. Published between January 8, 1868 and February, 1872, it was edited by Stanton and Parker Pillsbury and initially funded by George Francis Train, a wealthy and eccentric Democrat, and David Melliss, financial editor of the New York World newspaper.

Women Farmers

The Revolution - December 23, 1871

The Revolution – December 23, 1871

According to the Rochester Union there are two remarkable woman living on the shore of Canandaigua Lake in this State. They appear to have demonstrated the truth that some women become successful agriculturists. The Misses Fuller are the owners of two beautiful farms which they have reclaimed from the primitive wilderness. At the death of their father, a settler of half a century ago in what was then the great West, his children were left with nothing but an inheritance of land; and the two girls, Laura and Electra, resolved to become practical farmers. Both are now past sixty, and since early womanhood they have cultivated their ground with their own hands. Each has a smiling farm and a sung cottage, the latter nestling among shade-trees, close to the edge of the lake. The lands bearing “fruit, vines, grass and other crops,” stretch far away up the rolling hills.

Miss Laura Fuller is described as wearing a “short and rather loosely-fitting dress, a hood, and a pair of men’s boots.” She has “a beard as heavy as is often seen upon a man, and a voice that would not be mistaken for that of a woman. She is well informed, and shows that her heart is in her work, which she carries on without masculine help, and with decided prosperity. Her sister Electra is regarded as the main business manager. She has much the appearance of her sister, but she is “more dignified and patriarchal, with a head considerably bald, and locks whitened by the frosts of many Winters.” She cut away the virgin forest that once covered her farm with her own hands. All the toil that was needed to bring the land into condition she performed, solitary and alone. She has reared stock of all kinds, including fine horses and colts, for which a great fancy had been taken.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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mitchells

New American County Histories – Fall 2016

Most of these large volumes were published between 1870 and 1920 and have long formed the cornerstone of local historical and genealogical research. They are encyclopedic in scope and virtually limitless in their research possibilities.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.

We are in the midst of expanding this collection to cover all parts of the United States.  New full-text searchable titles are coming online all the time.  These are some the new additions from the last part of 2016.

Alabama

  • CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION IN ALABAMA.
  • HISTORY OF ALABAMA: AND INCIDENTALLY OF GEORGIA AND MISSISSIPPI, FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD – VOL. 1.

Colorado

  • HISTORY OF CLEAR CREEK AND BOULDER VALLEYS, COLORADO: CONTAINING A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE STATE OF COLORADO FROM ITS EARLIEST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME, EMBRACING ITS GEOLOGICAL, PHYSICAL AND CLIMATIC FEATURES; ITS AGRICULTURAL, STOCKGROWING, RAILROAD AND MINING INTERESTS; AN ACCOUNT OF THE UTE TROUBLE; A HISTORY OF GILPIN, CLEAR CREEK, BOULDER AND JEFFERSON COUNTIES, AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

Florida

  • ALACHUA, THE GARDEN COUNTY OF FLORIDA, ITS RESOURCES AND ADVANTAGES.
  • HISTORICAL SKETCHES OF COLONIAL FLORIDA.
  • THE HISTORY OF SAINT AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA: WITH AN INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNT OF THE EARLY SPANISH AND FRENCH ATTEMPTS AT EXPLORATION AND SETTLEMENT IN THE TERRITORY OF FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH SKETCHES OF EVENTS AND OBJECTS OF INTEREST CONNECTED WITH THE OLDEST TOWN IN THE UNITED STATES; TO WHICH IS ADDED A SHORT DESCRIPTION OF THE CLIMATE AND ADVANTAGES OF SAINT AUGUSTINE AS A HEALTH RESORT.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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