The Bottle

A Victim and his Child in The Colored American

We occasionally find a capital police report in the St. Louis Bulletin. On a recent occasion a bloated being, named Johnson, by profession an actor, was found drunk in the streets by a good hearted sailor, who in vain attempted to win him from his vile ways and evil companions. Johnson continued to drink, until he fell to the ground like a beast, when the following scene ensued;

“Just as they were about removing the miserable wretch to prison, a little girl about eight years old, barefooted and extremely ragged, came into the room sobbing and crying most bitterly. No sooner did she see her father than she ran to him, knelt down by his side, and motioning the officer away, cried – “Don’t take away papa while he sleeps! By and by he will wake up once more and kiss me.”

The Colored AmericanIt was a sight to wring the heart of more than man to see that pure and innocent creature, with her little head bare and her white shoulder peeping out from her tattered frock, leaning with fond affection over her drunken father, as if her affection strengthened with the unworthiness of its object. At length the sailor came forward, and speaking kindly to the little girl, took her away in his arms, and wrapped her little feet carefully in the skirts of his coat. The brutish father, by this time snoring in complete and disgusting insensibility, was then taken to the guard house for the purpose of sobering him.

This morning, after manifesting some symptoms of that most dreadful of diseases – mania [ ], he seemed to regain his senses in a measure, and confessed having been drunk, “I was not,” said he, “always the miserable wretch to which drunkenness has reduced me. I once was respected by friends, and beloved by my family. But I contracted bad habits, which got so strong and old upon my nervous temperament as to make a beast of me. My business was neglected, and my wife died, I do believe of a broken heart. Since that time I have wandered around the world without end or aim, except to procure whiskey! I have yet a daughter – at least I had yesterday – a beautiful, tender creature, who still loves me, despite my unworthiness.”

At this moment the benevolent sailor entered the room, leading the little girl by the hand. He had dressed her with new and comfortable clothes, and she looked really very pretty and interesting. After learning that a small fine had been imposed upon Johnson, he immediately paid it, and leading the little girl forward, placed her in her father’s arms. The poor man wept and sobbed over her as if he had been an infant: and for our part, we do not believe there was dry eye in the room. The three left the room together, and we sincerely hope that this lesson will work a thorough reformation upon the unhappy and degraded man.”

Now, my youthful readers, was not this an affectionate, good little girl? And do you not, while you read about her love her? And will you not try to be like her, although, we presume and hope, you have not a drunken father as this little girl had?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Collection: African American Newspapers
Publication: The Colored American
Date: April 11, 1840
Title: A Victim and his Child
Location: New York, New York

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An Appeal for WM. S. Bailey of Kentucky

Sir:

I wish to say a word to the Republicans of the free States, which I hope will be copied into other Republican journals. William S. Bailey of Newport, Ky., has edited and published, for seven years, an Anti-Slavery paper in Kentucky.

He and his family have suffered slow martyrdom all this time. He has been maliciously prosecuted, his buildings have been burned, and he has endured personal violence. But he preserves, and is resolved to do so till Kentucky becomes a free State. He needed new type for his paper, and I undertook to raise $500 of the $1,000 required for that purpose in the Massachusetts Legislature and in Boston.

I have sent him $430, and shall probably get the remainder. Other friends in Boston have sent him $200; friends in Salem nearly $200. He now needs and ought to have immediately $1,000 to pay on his house which he has sacrificed for Freedom, but holds still under mortgage. He will lose the opportunity of redemption unless he is aided to this amount. His paper is doing good service in Kentucky.

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The Confederacy and a Culture of Vegetables

There is nothing we shall want more during the coming season than an abundant supply of vegetables. The army will need them to preserve its men from scurvy. The people will need them to make up for the inordinate price of meat.

It is the duty, as well as the interest, of everybody to cultivate as large a quantity as possible. There is not a yard in any city or town which should not be made to contribute something towards the general store.

Among other inducements, it may be mentioned that vegetables, with few exceptions, are exempted from the tithe, and that they are not taxed beyond the income tax on the profits from their sales. A little attention and a little labor given to this end would do incalculable good.

Part I of our Civil War collection, A Newspaper Perspective, contains articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York Herald, The Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.

Source

Collection: The Civil War
Publication: The Charleston Mercury
Date: April 7, 1864
Title:
Culture of Vegetables

Top Image:  Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

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Richmond Fire and Evacuation

Victory! Victory!

The Dying Struggle of the Rebellion, the Crowning Victories of the Union

Now let the country rejoice. The great jubilee of our final deliverance is at hand. Yesterday was a glorious Sabbath day for the cause of the Union, the brightest in the calendar since the beginning of this terrible war; for it opens wide the way to peace and the complete vindication of the republic.

Corner Governor and Cary Streets, Richmond, Virginia, May 1865

Corner Governor and Cary Streets, Richmond, Virginia, May 1865

Between the two Urban armies immediately under the eye of General Grant, and the rebel forces under General Lee, there was a tremendous struggle yesterday for Richmond, in the woods and fields, hills and valleys, and on the roads and creeks a few miles south and west of Petersburg, and from twenty-five to thirty miles beyond the rebel capital. The movement of General Grant in force against the Southside Railroad, the most important to Lee of his last two remaining arteries of subsistence, reduced him to the alternative of a fight for the road or the evacuation of Richmond. Grant, of permitted to occupy the Southside road, would be in a position to command, occupy or destroy the Danville road; and Lee, thus completely isolated from his communications, would be driven to the expedient of leaving the city by cutting his way out, or by a stealthy evacuation, in order to secure his necessary supplies.

General Lee accepted the wager of battle, and the results are before our readers in President Lincoln brief, graphic and admirable dispatches. They give us a birdseye view of the whole field of the army operations, and are perfectly satisfactory. Twelve thousand prisoners and fifty pieces of artillery in the work of carrying difficult positions and powerful fortifications, over a line of battle from fifteen to twenty miles in extent, will do for one day. Lee, closely cornered last night in Petersburg, will, in all probability, before tomorrow morning, if he can get off, be on the road to Lynchburg. That now is his only line of escape. The end is indeed near at hand. Let the people give thanks and rejoice.

Part I of our Civil War collection, A Newspaper Perspective, contains articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York Herald, The Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.

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Good Style, Godey's Lady's Book

Good Style in Godey’s Lady’s Book, April 1895

A girl sees a pretty fashion plate, she has it copied by a good dressmaker. The dress is put on, it is good and expensive, but where is the style? It is not there. The wearer is young, she has a pretty face; what is it that makes her look ordinary, commonplace?

She stoops.

Another girl has an inexpensive dress, she has such a look of thoroughbred that if she speaks, people listen; at each turn of her head one sees a new beauty in her face. Wherever she moves our eyes follow her; what is it which makes all she wears look well?

It is the true dignity and ease of her carriage.

Without a good carriage a pretty face is thrown away, the most perfect dress-cutting and fitting are thrown away, even refinement of manner is hidden under a bushel. To carry herself well is almost the only personal distinction left to a woman; it positively alters her features.

With the head erect, the chest expanded, and the back teeth slightly set together (keeping the mouth open often accompanies stooping), the chin gains decision,the upper lip shortens, and really the nose straightens.

The pleased feeling of not being at a disadvantage with the world gives a look of pleasure to the eyes, dresses when made and worn do look like the stylish fashion-plate from which they are copied, and life is a sweet success.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

Collection:  Godey’s Lady’s Book
Publication: Godey’s Lady’s Book
Date: April, 1895
Title: Good Style
Location: Philadelphia, PA

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