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Sin of Slavery

The Church in Fault; The Sin of Slavery (1838)

The great sin of slavery and caste as they exist in this country, do more to neutralize the means of grace, and block up the way of salvation, than all other things combined. Slavery is THE SIN of the nation and caste, THE SIN of the Church; and if these sins need not to be prayed and wept over – if they need not to be repented of an removed, then may all sin be tolerated.

If it be not the business and duty of the ministers of Jesus Christ, to set themselves at work, to convince the world, and especially the Church of these sins, then have the ministers nothing to do in the church militant; the sooner they go home to heaven, the better.

If we were to judge from the silence on these subjects, of ministers in the northern sections of the church, and the practice of these evils by ministers in the southern sections, we should conclude that oppression, the most cruel and unreasonable oppression, was no crime. But, alas! we cannot judge ;by this fallible standard; God has in his word, and by his providence, told us to the contrary. Oppression is the antipode of Christian charity. No sin in the history of the church nor world, has so readily provoked the wrath, and brought down the vengeance of God upon the nations, as oppression. In all ages, Jehovah has seemed, without the semblance of pity, to pour out his judgments upon oppressors. And yet do the clergy of our land SLEEP over this sin!!!

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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LI-KY-Frontier

A Look Inside – Kentucky: The Pioneer State of the West

What is now the Commonwealth of Kentucky was inhabited by varying cultures of Native Americans from at least 1000 BC to about 1650 AD, particularly along the waterways and in areas of game where Bison.

By the time that European and colonial explorers and settlers began entering Kentucky in greater number in the mid-18th century, there were no major Native American settlements in the region. The Iroquois had controlled much of the Ohio River valley for hunting from their bases in what is now New York.

After the American Revolution, the counties of Virginia beyond the Appalachian Mountains became known as Kentucky County. Eventually, the residents of Kentucky County petitioned for a separation from Virginia. In 1790, Kentucky’s delegates accepted Virginia’s terms of separation, and a state constitution was drafted at the final convention in April 1792. On June 1, 1792, Kentucky became the fifteenth state to be admitted to the union.

This volume appears in our Kentucky County Histories collection. It was written by Thomas Crittenden Cherry and was published by D.C. Heath and Company in 1935.

KENTUCKY: The Pioneer State of the West

Preface

Human conduct has been much the same since time began. The behavior of a group of people in any age or country may, in a great measure, interpret that of all large groups. The history of any state of our nation will be found similar in many ways to that of any other state, and to that of the social and political movements of our country as a whole. For this reason the history of Kentucky should be studied in connection with the history of the United States.

The history of Kentucky in many ways is unique. Cut off from the nearest settlements of the East by hundreds of miles of wild forest-covered mountains, this inland wilderness became the scene of a most bloody and heroic struggle. Beginning at the breaking out of the Revolutionary War, the first settlers received the full force of the savage attacks of British and Indian foes. In spite of these, this heroic band of pioneers succeeded in founding their homes and becoming a powerful guard at the back door of the colonies of the East. Chiefly through their efforts the Northwest Territory was wrested from the British and Indians, and by the treaty of 1783 became a part of the territory of the United States. This westward thrust, delivered in the nick of time, likewise led to the successful conquest of the vast land domain reaching to the Pacific Ocean.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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open-air-OG

Chicago’s Open Window School

In September 1909, two rooms were opened in the Graham school in Chicago to show what natural cold air will do for normal pupils. No selection of individuals was made except that as children entered the school for their first year’s work they were given their choice of entering a cold room or a warm one. Of course, some pains were taken to inform the parents in advance as to what it was expected the cold air would do. After several weeks of trial in which no bad effects followed, teachers, parents and pupils, seeing what had been done for those in the two rooms, asked for rooms in the other grades for the same sort of work. The school year closed with seven open rooms.

So satisfactory was the work that the school opened in September, 1910, with twenty cold rooms, merely retaining enough of the warm air rooms to insure a place in a warm room in every grade for pupils whose parents desired them to have it and also a place for teachers to work in warm air in case some of them feared that work in a cold room might prove too strenuous. The Board of Education also constructed two canvas-sided rooms on a roof of the Graham School to give the matter a more definite trial and to gather the results of the work of normal pupils in open air. The rooms may be duplicated anywhere for six hundred dollars each. They were completed too late in the spring for any tests to be made in them.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Behind the Lines

Pictorial: Behind the Lines of our Allies (1917)

This photo feature appeared in the May 24, 1917 edition of Frank Leslie’s Weekly. Frank Leslie’s Weekly, later often known as Leslie’s Weekly, actually began life as Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. Founded in 1855 and continued until 1922, it was an American illustrated literary and news publication, and one of several started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. John Y. Foster was the first editor of the Weekly, which came out on Tuesdays. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.

The ancient and honorable artillery horse

The army horse its patience and reliability all are familiar. This caravan is bringing to the fighting line a supply of ammunition. Across each animal’s back are hung ammunition bags and each horse’s load is 8 shells, besides canteens and other needed things.  Since the Germans in their retreat destroyed all roads, the supplying of the troops falls upon horses and mules until motors and trains can again be used.

The ancient and honorable artillery horse.

Squirrel or Poilu?

Nature provided a snug Retreat for this French soldier. A hole in the base of a hollow tree is a small but Cozy home, warm, dry and safe or as safe as anything can be on the Battlefront. Reading his mail. The Ingenuity of soldiers and making trench life bearable as been entrusted by many photographs of unique devices, invented in necessity, as substitutes for the conveniences of home.

Squirrel or Poilu?

Squirrel or Poilu?

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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School History of South Carolina

A Look Inside: School History of South Carolina

As part of our expansion of our American County Histories Collection, we have new volumes coming online every month. On May 1, 2017, the 1864 title School History of South Carolina by John Abney Chapman became available.

This volume is an excellent example of how South Carolina’s state history was taught to students living in the state at the end of the 19th century. Of particular interest to Civil War buffs will be Chapter XL: The War Of Secession. The book’s author had to convey the history to the children and grandchildren of the Confederate soldiers who experienced it first hand.

INTRODUCTION

This book is written for the young, therefore the style is easy and animated. Short stories are occasionally introduced for the purpose of fixing upon the mind of the youthful student the truths of the history which the stories are intended to illustrate.

It has been revised and edited, and the questions have been prepared by practical teachers, so as to adapt it for use in the schoolroom.

It also has a full index, so as to make it useful as a book of handy reference.

South Carolina has a history of which none of her children need be ashamed, and it is the patriotic duty of each citizen to see that every effort is made to keep alive in the minds of each rising generation that reverence for the heroic deeds of our ancestors which inspires youth to emulate examples of bravery, daring and self-sacrifice.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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