Part III: The Generals’ Perspective

General McClellanThe Generals’ Perspective allows a look into the way the battles within the war were fought. Here the emphasis is on strategies and tactics as planned and executed by the commanding officers, with a longer-term view as opposed to daily concerns.

Many of these books were written to raise money. For example, General Grant wrote his memoirs to provide for his family as he was dying of cancer.

As memoirs, many of the books go beyond the war to describe an officer’s entire career. While the emphasis is on the Union, a number of Confederate generals’ narratives are included, as well.

Collection Details

  1. Abraham Lincoln: complete works, comprising his speeches, letters, state papers, and miscellaneous writings, Vols. 1-2
  2. Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general, United States Army, Vols. 1-2
  3. Correspondence of John Sedgwick, Major-General
  4. Forty-six years in the army, by Lieutenant-General John M. Schofield
  5. From Manassas to Appomattox: memoirs of the Civil War in America, by James Longstreet
  6. General Lee, by Fitzhugh Lee, his nephew
  7. Home letters of General Sherman, edited by M. A. De Wolfe Howe
  8. Jefferson Davis ex-president of the Confederate States of America: a memoir by his wife, Vols. 1-2
  9. The life and campaigns of General U.S. Grant: from boyhood to his inauguration as president of the United States: including an accurate account of Sherman’s greatest march from Chattanooga to Washington and the final official reports of Sheridan, Meade, Sherman and Grant
  10. The life, campaigns, and public services of General McClellan, the hero of Western Virginia! South Mountain! And Antietam!
  11. Life of Andrew Hull Foote, rear-admiral United States Navy
  12. The life of David Glasgow Farragut, first admiral of the United States Navy, embodying his journal and letters, by his son, Loyall Farragut
  13. The life and letters of Emory Upton, by Peter S. Michie
  14. Life and letters of General Thomas J. Jackson (Stonewall Jackson), by his wife, Mary Anna Jackson, with an introduction by Henry M. Field
  15. The life and public services of Ambrose E. Burnside, soldier, citizen, statesman
  16. McClellan’s own story: the war for the Union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it and his relations to it and to them
  17. Memoirs of Gen. W. T. Sherman, written by himself, with an appendix, bringing his life down to its closing scenes, also a personal tribute and critique of the memoirs, Vols. 1-2, by Hon. James G. Blaine
  18. Memoirs of Robert E. Lee his military and personal history embracing a large amount of information hitherto unpublished, by A.L. Long formerly military secretary to Gen. Lee, afterward Brig. Gen. and Chief of Artillery Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, together with incidents relating to his private life subsequent to the war, collected and edited with the assistance of Marcus J. Wright formerly Brig. Gen. Army of Tennessee and agent of the United States for the Collection of Confederate Records
  19. The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865: including a brief personal sketch and a narrative of his services in the war with Mexico, 1846-8, Vols. 1-2
  20. Personal memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, general, United States Army, Vols. 1-2
  21. Personal memoirs of U.S. Grant, Vols. 1-2
  22. Private and official correspondence of Gen. Benjamin F. Butler: during the period of the Civil War, Vols. 1-5
  23. Reminiscences of peace and war, by Mrs. Roger A Pryor
  24. Serving the republic: memoirs of the civil and military life of Nelson A. Miles, Lieutenant-General, United States Army
  25. Stonewall Jackson and the American Civil War, Vols. 1-2, by Lieut. Col. G.F.R. Henderson