Tag Archives: 19th century
Hayes-Lost

President Hayes: A Lost Opportunity

President Hayes has lost another opportunity of reminding the country of its injustice toward woman. Again a message has gone before Congress, and no mention made of the women citizens of the country.

The Chinese have a saying, that “even the gods cannot help those who lose an opportunity.”

Two years ago, a committee from the National Woman Suffrage convention was appointed to call upon President Hayes, and remind him that no women had been appointed as commissioners from this country to the Paris Exposition, while many of the departments the commissioners were to investigate could much more satisfactorily be reported upon by women—as laces, embroideries, &c. The president received this committee, of which the editor of the NATIONAL CITIZEN was one with due courtesy, even reading from among his private papers those duties of commissioners which he recognized as more likely to be satisfactorily performed by women. “But, ladies, you are too late,” said he. “You should have petitioned Congress a year ago; these appointments have been settled a long time.”

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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How to Cook Potatoes

How to Cook Potatoes in Godey’s Lady’s Book

Godey’s Lady’s Book magazine was intended to entertain, inform and educate the women of America. In addition to extensive fashion descriptions and plates, the early issues included biographical sketches, articles about mineralogy, handcrafts, female costume, the dance, equestrienne procedures, health and hygiene, recipes and remedies and the like.

Our collection provides the complete run of Godey’s Lady’s Book, and is the only one containing the color plates as they originally appeared.

These potato recipes appeared in the February 1867 issue of Godey’s Lady’s Book.

BOILED POTATOES — There are really so many ways of even boiling potatoes that it is difficult to satisfy one’s mind which is the best, each being good, providing it is well done. The French, however, hold that by using too much water the flavor of the potatoes becomes seriously impaired; but it depends entirely upon the quality of the potatoes whether they are better done in their jackets or peeled: though towards the end of spring, when they get old, it is greatly preferable to pare them, as the skins then contain a narcotic property which gives the potatoes a strongly disagreeable flavor. In any case, potatoes should be boiled quickly, care being taken to choose them of an equal size, and cutting them in half when they are large. Rather small-sized potatoes are to be chosen in preference to those of overgrown proportions, and it is at all times in better taste to have potatoes rather underdone than boiled to pieces.

The following is the most generally received method of boiling potatoes. Thoroughly wash and pare them, place them in a small saucepan with sufficient cold water to cover them, place them upon a clear fire, and bring them to a boil as speedily as possible. Good potatoes of a proper size will be done in about fifteen or twenty minutes after beginning to boil. Strain off the water and serve as soon as possible, without sprinkling salt over them, or adding any to the water in which they were cooked. One thing against the addition of salt is that careless cooks generally use it with such a heavy hand. Some housekeepers advocate placing the saucepan of potatoes over the fire again after the water has been poured away, but if the potatoes are done as they should be, this process, instead of being an improvement, only tends to give the potatoes a bad flavor. When intended to be mashed or converted into a made-dish, potatoes should invariably be boiled without salt being employed, as it deadens them both in flavor and quality; but for made-dishes generally potatoes are preferable steamed instead of boiled.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

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Port of Havana-Cover

Visiting the Port of Havana in 1856

The American going to Cuba for the first time anxiously watches for the first glimpse of the famed “gem of the Antilles.” The announcement of “land in sight,” calls him to the deck; presently there looms up upon the clear atmosphere, a number of snowy white spots, which rapidly gain solidity, and take shape.

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

First are made out the frowning walls of Moro Castle and Light House. To the right is the Punta, in front of which was executed the unfortunate Lopez. Beyond is the fortress of Cabana, one of the strongest in the world. Such are the individual peculiarities of our faithful picture of the entrance of the port of Havana.

Every vessel entering is telegraphed, and such houses as do not command a view of the Moro, reflect the signals by means of looking-glasses affixed to some lofty part of the premises.

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

In the central distance of the view is the fort of Aratas, where the fifty Americans under command of Crittenden, and attached to the Lopez expedition, were barbarously shot by the Havana authorities. To the left is the Prince’s fort, and below is the suburb of Jesse Maria.

Part of the harbor of Havana is shown, and on the right the view of a part of the city. The friends of Crittenden contemplate erecting a magnificent monument to his memory in front of the fort of Aratas, the moment the island is in possession of the United States.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
Source: Frank Leslies Weekly, February 9, 1856


Howes Appeal

Julia Ward Howe’s Appeal to Womanhood

Again, in the sight of the Christian world, have the skill and power of two great nations exhausted themselves in mutual murder. Again have the sacred questions of international justice been committed to the fatal mediation of military weapons. In this day of progress, in this century of light, the ambition of rulers has been allowed to barter the dear interests of domestic life for the bloody exchanges of the battle-field. Thus men have done. Thus men will do. But women need no longer be made a party to proceedings which fill the globe with grief and horror. Despite the assumptions of physical force, the mother has a sacred and commanding word to say to the sons who owe their life to her suffering. That word should now be heard, and answered to as never before.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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classroom

Lucy Brand: The First Woman Voter of New York

The National Citizen and Ballot Box was a monthly journal deeply involved in the roots of the American feminist movement. It was owned and edited by Matilda Joslyn Gage, American women’s rights advocate, who helped to lead and publicize the suffrage movement in the United States.

Lucy Brand Votes

How she Heard the News. How she Voted.

Mrs. Lucy A. Brand, Principal of the Genesee School of this city, a woman with abilities as good as those of any male principal, but who, because she is a woman, receives five hundred and fifty dollars less salary a year than a male principal, was the first woman in the State of New York to cast a vote under the new school law.

On Saturday afternoon she was at a friend’s house, when the Journal was thrown in, containing the first editorial notice of the passage of the law. Mrs. Brand saw the welcome announcement. “Let us go and register,” she at once said, her heart swelling with joy and thankfulness that even this small quantity of justice had been done woman. “Where is my shawl? I feel as if I should die, if I don’t get there,” for the hour was late, and the time for closing the registry lists was near at hand. To have lost this opportunity would have placed her in position of a second Tantalus, the cup withdrawn just as it touched her lips.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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