Tag Archives: African American Newspapers
LiquorOG

A Warning to Drinkers of Intoxicating Liquors (1854)

These warnings about contaminated alcohol appeared in the May 6, 1854 issue of the Provincial Freeman.

The Provincial Freeman was devoted to Anti-Slavery, Temperance, and General Literature, and was affiliated with no particular Political Party. Its prospectus stated, “it will open its columns to the views of men of different political opinions, reserving the right, as an independent Journal, of full expression on all questions or projects affecting the people in a political way; and reserving, also, the right to express emphatic condemnation of all projects, having for their object in a great or remote degree, the subversion of the principles of the British Constitution, or of British rule in the Provinces.”

To be Meditated upon by Drinkers of Intoxicating Liquors

ADULTERATION OF ALE – If any additional arguments were needed why people ought to abstain from ale and porter surely a sufficient reason would be found in the drugs with which the liquors are so adulterated. In the essay on Brewing, published in the Library of Useful Knowledge, we find, that in the manufacture of beer, sugar, molasses, honey and liquorice, are used for malt. Broom, opium, gentian, quassia, aloes, marsh, trefoil, coculus indicus, tobacco, nux vomica, are used for hops, and the last mentioned are known to be highly poisonous. Saltpetre, common salt, mixed with flour, jalap, the fiery liquid called spirit of maranta, bruised green copperas, live eggshells, hartshorn shaving, nutgalls, potash, and soda, are used to prevent acidity. Coriander seeds, carraways, orange peel, long pepper, casisum, grains of paradise, have been employed for flavour. Coculus indicus, bitter bean, nux vomica, and opium, which are strong poisons, are used for the purpose of producing intoxication. Here the reader will perceive how avarice has studied to enrich itself at the expense of the health, and lives, and morals of the people. – English Publication.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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The Present – An Age of Hope (1837)

Hope is made up of two ingredients, desire and expectation. Hope for a special object, is a desire for that object, in full expectation of obtaining it, accompanied with prominent reasons why.

Desire for an object, without expecting to obtain it is not hope, and to expect an object with no desire for it, is also, not hope; but both united is real hope.

Such hope, produces corresponding action, and influences to such steps as will secure the end hoped for. It leads the mind, wisely, to adopt those measures, which are most appropriate to accomplish the end in view; in a word, it makes the subject a consistent one. The present age of time, may be considered verily, one of hope; for wherever we turn our eyes, we see men of all classes buoyant with hope. The mechanic, and the artisan, each hoping to excel; the merchant and the commercial man sustained principally by hope, in their enterprises; and in the great political contest, and amidst the rage of speculation, the one, hoping for political honor, and the other, that fortune may attend his emergencies. But with no class of citizens is the above more emphatically true, than with colored Americans.

We have everything to hope and nothing to fear. It is impossible, that our condition in this land of republicanism, and in this age of reform, can be worse than it has been; we must, therefore, be on the verge of a better condition. – It is one of hope.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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What has the North to do with Slavery_

What has the North to do with Slavery? (1838)

This an abridged version of an article titled “What has the North to do with Slavery?” that appeared in The Colored American in February, 1838. The Colored American, with Samuel E. Cornish as editor. The new motto was RIGHTEOUSNESS EXALTETH A NATION, and the paper was “...designed to be the organ of Colored Americans—to be looked on as their own, and devoted to their interests.

What has the North to do with Slavery?

How often is this question asked by citizens of the free states of this union? Alas, this question is not unfrequently asked, by the professed followers of the holy Jesus. Our heart bleeds within us, when we read of the cruel sufferings, the despair, the brutality and the hopeless miseries, to which millions of our brethren, made of the same blood and by the same God, are subjected in the Southern states of this Republic.

How would the ambassadors of Christ warn the people, and wrestle with God for deliverance from the crying sin?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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John Jay

John Jay, Founding Father and Abolitionist

John Jay was born into a wealthy family of merchants and government officials in New York City. He became a lawyer and joined the New York Committee of Correspondence, organizing opposition to British polices in the time preceding the American Revolution.

Jay was a slaveholder, as were many wealthy New Yorkers during the time period. However, in 1774 Jay drafted the Address to the People of Great Britain, which draws upon the image of slavery and compares the British treatment of blacks to the British treatment of all colonists.

Friends and Fellow-Subjects: When a Nation, lead to greatness by the hand of Liberty, and possessed of all the Glory that heroism, munificence, and humanity can bestow, descends to the ungrateful task of forging chains for her friends and children, and instead of giving support to Freedom, turns advocate for Slavery and Oppression, there is reason to suspect she has either ceased to be virtuous, or been extremely negligent in the appointment of her Rulers.

After 1777, Jay took a more active leadership role in the movement to abolish slavery. Between 1777 and 1785, two laws abolition laws he drafted failed to pass. Almost every member of the New York legislature had voted for some form of emancipation in 1785, but they were unable to agree on which rights to give the newly free black New Yorkers.

Aaron Burr also called for immediate abolition, and numerous slaveholders independently freed their slaves after the Revolution, but thousands were held in New York City alone.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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MVB-Slavery

Martin Van Buren and Slavery

This appeared in the March 11, 1837 issue of The Colored American newspaper.

The following extracts from President Van Buren’s inaugural address, present his views and designs, in regard to the question of Slavery:

“The last, perhaps the greatest, of the prominent sources of discord and disaster supposed to lurk in our political condition, was the institution of domestic slavery.”

“Perceiving, before my election, the deep interest this subject was beginning to excite, I believed it a solemn duty fully to make known my sentiments in regard to it”

“I then declared that, if the desire of those of my countrymen who were favorable to my election, was gratified, I must go into the Presidential Chair the inflexible and uncompromising opponent of every attempt, on the part of Congress, to abolish Slavery in the District of Columbia, against the wishes of the slaveholding States, and also, with a determination equally decided, to resist the slightest interference with it in the States where it exists.”
“It now only remains to add that no bill conflicting with these views, can ever receive my constitutional sanction.”

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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