Tag Archives: African American Newspapers
A Pro-Slavery Catechism

A Pro-Slavery Catechism

This ran in the Wiskonsan (Wisconsin) Freeman and was reproduced in the African American Newspapers’s The National Era (Washington, D.C.) on July 8, 1847.

The 1847 Prospectus for The National Era stated, “…While due attention will be paid to Current Events, Congressional Proceedings, General Politics and Literature, the great aim of the paper will be a complete discussion of the Question of Slavery, and an exhibition of the Duties of the Citizen in relation to it; especially will it explain and advocate the leading Principles and Measures of the Liberty Party, seeking to do this, not in the spirit of the Party, but in the love of Truth—not for the triumph of Party, but for the establishment of Truth…”

A Pro-Slavery Catechism

  • Who was the first negro? Cain.
  • How did he become so? The Lord set a black mark upon him.
  • Did the Southern slave come from him? Yes.
  • How did they get through the flood? O, no! they didn’t come from him; they came from Ham.
  • How do you know that? Because Ham means black.
  • Upon whom did Noah pronounce a curse? Upon Ham.
  • Does the Bible say so? No, it says Canaan, but then it means Ham.
  • Does that curse make it right that the blacks should be enslaved? Yes.
  • Why? Because they should be.
  • Don’t the Bible say that Christ should be crucified? Yes.
  • Well, did that make it right? No; but the cases are not parallel.
  • From what country did the slave come? From Africa.
  • Did the descendants of Canaan people Africa? No; but that makes no difference.
  • Who were the happiest men that ever lived? The Patriarchs.
  • Why? Because they didn’t have to work.
  • Who was the first Patriarch? Abraham.
  • Why were not Methusaleh, Enoch, and Noah, Patriarchs? Because they didn’t hold slaves.
  • How do you know that Abraham’s servants were slaves? Because he whipped Hagar.
  • How do you know that? Because she ran away.
  • How do you know that it is right to flog slaves? Because God sent Hagar back.
  • When Abraham took three hundred and eighteen slaves, and pursued the kings, why did they not run away, as slaves now do? Either because Abraham had his hounds along, or because God had taught them better.
  • Were the Israelites allowed to hold slaves? Yes.
  • Whom might they hold? The heathen round about.
  • How long? Forever.
  • Whom else might hold them? Their children after them.
  • Who are those children? Southern slaveholders.
  • How does that appear? The Jews were cut off, and the Gentiles grafted in, in their place.
  • But are not the slaves Gentiles, too? Yes, but they are heathen
  • Who ere the heathen whom the Jews might hold? The Canaanites.
  • How does that make it right to hold negroes, then? O, because they come from Ham.
  • Have the negroes been sold as slaves in all ages of the world? Yes.
  • Were the Roman slaves negroes? Yes.
  • How do you know? Because it is impossible to make anybody else slaves but negroes.
  • Did Christ and his apostles approve of Roman slavery? Yes.
  • How do you know? They didn’t say anything against it. (No; but the Bible does; for it says, “the merciful man spareth his beast.”)
  • Was Paul a good man? Yes, he was a holy saint.
  • What did he do? He sent back a runaway slave.
  • What was his advice, and that of the other apostle, to the slave? To abide in their calling, and be obedient to their masters.
This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
A Pro-Slavery Catechism in The National Era - July 8, 1847

A Pro-Slavery Catechism in The National Era – July 8, 1847


Moss

Ferocious Dueling in Mobile

On Sunday a duel was fought between two gentlemen from New Orleans. The scene of it was in the grove, South of the buildings known as the “Six Sisters,” in the lower suburbs of the city.

The parties were Charles Roman, son of ex-governor Roman, and W. H. Bouligny, son of a late Senator from Louisiana of that name. The fight commenced at one o’clock with small swords for weapons. The first pass was made by Mr. Bouligny, whose sword struck upon the suspender button of his antagonist, and broke in two. In the pass of Mr. Roman, made simultaneously the sword penetrated the side of Mr. Bouligny, inflicting a slight but not dangerous wound. The sword being broken, the parties resorted to pistols at five paces. At first fire Mr. Bouligny received the ball of his antagonist back of the hip. The wound was painful, but slight. The shot of Mr. Bouligny passed on without touching.

We learn that the duel originated in an old misunderstanding, but after both parties had stood steel and fire, they conceived a higher respect for each other, and left the field reconciled. They returned to New Orleans yesterday in the steamer Oregon.

–Mobile Tribune, April 4.

Source: Frederick Douglass Paper, May 5, 1854

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

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Work for Women of the Church

This article appeared in the January 19, 1893 issue of the Christian Recorder.

The Christian Recorder is the oldest existing black periodical in America, and the only one in the United States whose existence includes publication both before and after the Civil War.

The first editor of the Christian Recorder was the Reverend M. M. Clark, who was one of the first college graduates in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Clark was a graduate of Jefferson College and was considered to be one of the best-educated men in the A.M.E. Church. He wrote that the Recorder’s focus would be religion, morality, science and literature and it was to treat all geographical areas of the A.M.E. Church equally.

Work for Women of the Church

By Mrs. N. F. Mossell

The above title was given some years back by Rev. T.G. Steward to an able paper that appeared in the Christian Recorder at that time. The paper opened this wise.

Work for Women of the Church

Work for Women of the Church

“The man who will devise some plan whereby the many pious, earnest and intelligent women of our church may employ to a much larger extent their time and talents in the service of the Lord, will confer upon the Church and upon mankind a great benefit.” (The term ‘man’ being used generally.)

Dr. Steward proves within the limits of the above mentioned article that the majority of church members were women. The largest number of literate members were women. That women were more devoted, casting aside as unworthy the charge that women’s devotion was man worship of a masculine ministry, as do we also believing not the masculine ministry, but temperament of woman forms the basis of the fact that she is more easily led toward a life of devotion, Christian or otherwise than is man.

The proportion of earnest, true, Christian women is generally admitted to be greater than that of men. Hence the larger number of educated, pious people and consequently, people best prepared to do work in the church, are to be found among the women, further claims the doctor.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

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Posse

Rebels Slaves Chasers Detained in Alexandria

One of the Washington letter-writers says:

Gen. Heinzelman has within the past few weeks added to the population of Alexandria several Virginians whose desire to recover fugitive slaves outran their discretion.

"Jewels" of the "1st Families" of Va., consisting of [slave] "chains, bracelets, & anklets"

“Jewels” of the “1st Families” of Va., consisting of [slave] “chains, bracelets, & anklets”

When they presented themselves at his headquarters in search of their lost bondsmen, he informed them that the soldiers of the National army were not slave-catchers, and when, satisfied that he meant what he said, they essayed to return, to their farms, he declared that he could not permit civilians to go beyond or to remain within his lines.

One of them has, in consequence, been a month in Alexandria waiting for the army to advance to the other side of his plantation. ‘Dark-skinned Union men’ continue to geek General Heintzelman’s camp, but fewer rebel owners visit him.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source: Douglass’ Monthly, February 1862
Top Image: Posse pursuing a runaway slave by Bernarda Bryson, 1934 or 1935


George_P.A._Healy_-_John_Quincy_Adams_-_Google_Art_Project

John Quincy Adams and the Winnebagoes

Although Freedom’s Journal lived a relatively short life, it is important in that it was the first American newspaper written by blacks for blacks. From the beginning the editors felt, “…that a paper devoted to the dissemination of useful knowledge among our brethren, and to their moral and religious improvement, must meet with the cordial approbation of every friend to humanity…“.

Freedom’s Journal often included reprints from other newspapers like the one shown here.

The Winnebagoes at the Capital

The interview between the Winnebagoes and President John Quincy Adams is described very handsomely by a correspondent of the National Intelligencer. The address of the old Chief to the President is highly poetical. We copy as much of the article as our columns will admit.

An old chief stepped forth into the centre of the room, with a long uncouth pipe in his hand, which after a brief ceremonial not precisely intelligible, he brought near the President and waved over his head. It was the calumet of peace. Holding it then before him, and pointing to it, he began an harangue in low guttural tones, accompanied with much earnest gesture. He spoke in short paragraphs an Indian half blood reporting them in French, and a second interpreter conveying them in English.

“Father, I am glad to see you. I hold out the pipe, and I take your hand in friendship.

“Father, a cloud has been between us. It was thick and black. I thought once it would never be removed. But now I see your face. It looks upon me pleasantly.

“Father, a long way stretched between us. – There were these who told me it was blocked up. – They said the Red Men could not pass it. I attempted it. It is like the plain path which conducts to the Great Spirit.

“Father, when I came in sight of your home, it looked white and beautiful. My heart rejoiced. – I thought now I should talk with you.

“Father, the Great Spirit gave to his children, the Winnebagoes, a pleasant plant. It is good to smoke. I have it here,” – touching with his finger the bowl of the pipe – ‘I give it you in peace.’

“Father I am as old as you. My heart is true. They told me your heart was black. It is not so. We salute in friendship.

“Father, I say no more. My talk is little. I am a chief among my people. But one is here who will speak to you soon, and tell you better our thoughts.”

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

(more…)