Tag Archives: African American Newspapers
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Temperance Punch Bowl

Our enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day, including the Mexican War, Presidential and Congressional addresses, Congressional abstracts, business and commodity markets, the humanities, world travel and religion.

This item appeared in a 1901 issue of The Christian Recorder.

Temperance Punch Bowl

If we are to follow one of the jolly old customs bequeathed us by our English forbears, we must keep the punch bowl hospitably full through the holiday week. But even if this is not prepared for the week’s celebration it must not be neglected for New Year’ s cheer.

For those who are glad to emphasize the good cheer which this custom typifies, but who for conscience’s sake prefer a temperance beverage, the following concoction is recommended: Take the juice of three lemons and three oranges, one pineapple shredded from the core with a silver fork, one quart can of strawberries, one tablespoonfull of Ceylon tea, one quart of boiling water; pour the water on the tea and let it stand fifteen minutes. Add to the fruit one or two cups of sugar, according to acidity, and let it stand half an hour. When the tea is cold, add to the fruit and sugar one quart of apollinaris water and a block of ice; leave the pulp of the orange, as well as the shredded pineapple and berries, in the punch. In serving this slices of lemon are placed in each glass. If canned pineapple is used, lessen the quantity of sugar.

This forms a delicious concoction, and by keeping the various ingredients prepared in quantity they are quickly mixed as desired, and there need be no lack of this particular “good cheer,” no matter how many callers may “drop in” for the New Year’ s greetings.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source: Temperance Punch Bowl, The Christian Recorder, December 26, 1901

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wedding-veil

Wives in Demand in 1828

Wives seem to be in demand all over the world. The following is from an English paper:

Wants a Wife, – She must bee middel eaged and good tempered widdow, or a Maid, and pursest of propertey, and I wood, far reather have a Wife that is ever so plain than a fine Lady that think herself hansom, the Advertiser is not rich nor young, old nor poor, and in a very few years will have a good incoumb. – Can be hiley reckamended for onesty, sobrieaty, and good tempered and has no in combranc, is very actif, but not a treadesman, have been as Butler and Bailiff for meney years in most respectable famlies, and shood I not be so luckey as to get me a wife, wood de most willing to take a sitteyeashun once moor, wood prefer living in the countrey, understands Brewing most famousley, is well adapted for a inn or publick house.

Please to derect W.W. 68, Berwick street, Oxford roade, or aney Ladey must call and have a interview with the widdow that keeps the hous, and say where and when we can meet each other.

All letters must be pd, no Office keeper to apply. My fameley ar verey well off and welthey, far above middling order.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source: Freedom’s Journal, December 26, 1828

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produce-wagon

Market Gardeners in 1889

The short item below appeared in the April 18, 1889 issue of The Christian Recorder.

The Christian Recorder embodied secular as well as religious material, and included good coverage of the black regiments together with the major incidents of the Civil War. The four-page weekly contained such departments as Religious Intelligence, Domestic News, General Items, Foreign News, Obituaries, Marriages, Notices and Advertisements.  This newspaper is included in our African American Newspapers collection and all personal subscribers have access to this material.

While America’s modern food industry has gone high tech and produce is sourced globally, remnants of the system described here lingered on well into the 20th century.  The image above was taken in 1960.

Market Gardeners

The number of market wagons that come over from New Jersey and Long Island during the evening is exceedingly large. In order to get an idea of their traffic one has only to think of the enormous amount of vegetables, fruit, eggs and garden produce that is used every day to feed a great city like New York.

At midnight or before a start is made from the outskirts of the neighboring towns on either shore, and from that time until a few hours of daybreak the ferry boats and ferry houses are alive with wagons and carts . The horses know their duties so well that driving is scarcely necessary, and it is not an uncommon sight to see a horse pulling a cart on which is seated some old farmer quite fast asleep.

As soon as they get into town they steer for the various markets along the North River and sit on their wagons wrapped up in blankets until dawn, or until purchasers come along to buy their wares. There is considerable competition among the farmers for favorable places in which to stand their carts , and late arrivals are not so fortunate in their sales as are those who get into town earlier.

The life of a Long Island or New Jersey farmer is not altogether a happy one. He works in the field all day, and has to depend for whatever sleep he can get during the interval of his arrival in the city and 5 or 6 o’clock in the evening.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source: The Christian Recorder, April 18, 1889

Photo: Produce vendor with his horse-drawn cart at Washington Market, New York City, 1960

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Old slave block in St. Louis Hotel, New Orleans, La.

An Interesting Slave Case

A few months ago a slave, named ______ Brown, belonging to a Mr. Somerville of Maryland, was murdered by his master. Some time after, the master himself was murdered, and a brother of the murdered slave was taken up and tried for the offense. Not the smallest evidence could be made out against him, and he was acquitted.

Acquittal of a colored man in such a region of the world must be held as a most convincing proof of his innocence. But the relatives of the deceased sold Brown into the desolating bondage of the South. He made his escape from New Orleans and reached Philadelphia, where he expected to live in safety. But the man-stealer was on his track. Brown had a wife and seven children in Maryland, whom he was desirous of rescuing from bondage. He had assumed the name of Russell, but a correspondence was commenced from Philadelphia in his real name; the letter reached the slave-owners, and they determined to be revenged still farther.

The thieves of Maryland had no longer any control over his body as property, for they had made it over to the thieves of New Orleans; but two of them appeared at Philadelphia, claiming Brown as a murderer!! This is a favorite and hackneyed mode of seizing a victim. The applicants knew well that they had no right to claim the persecuted man as a murderer, for he had been tried and acquitted and could not be tried again. But, if they had him once in their possession, they could easily do privately what they could not do judicially, and, at least, they could punish him severely for running away, and restore him to chains and bondage.

Two bloodhounds appeared at the magistrate’s office in Philadelphia, claiming their victim. He was clapped into prison, but the warrant was informal, and on that ground he was released. Seizing the favorable moment, before the informality could be remedied, Brown made track for Canada, passing through New York. Rev. Mr. Young of that city, kindly agreed to accompany the persecuted man to Canada.

Without the loss of a moment, they proceeded to Montreal, and laid the case before Lord Elgin, claiming that protection which it is the glory of the British law to give to the innocent. Proofs of the trial and acquittal, which, with other particulars, had been published in pamphlet form, were laid before the Governor-General, who gave his unqualified assurance that the hunted man would not be surrendered to his persecutors.

The appeal was not too soon. Next day the two bloodseekers presented themselves before the Governor-General, demanding the surrender of Brown, and, it is almost unnecessary to say, they met with a pointed refusal. And now, this injured man, with his wife and seven children, who had also escaped, are in Canada, safe from the hands of the man-stealer. Some magistrate, from ignorance of the facts, may give him up on a charge of murder, although this is not likely. However, to prevent it, we have to request our contemporaries, as an act of justice and humanity, to hand around this note of warning.

Let it never be said that there is a single magistrate in the length and breadth of British North America so ignorant or so indifferent as to surrender a fellow man into the hands of the relentless slaveholder. – Toronto Banner.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source: The North Star, September 7, 1849
Image: Old slave block in St. Louis Hotel, New Orleans, La.

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Arkansas_1898_tornado_damage

Where Tornadoes Begin

The most remarkable and interesting features of the development of tornadoes is the fact that they nearly always from southeast of a moving center of low pressure, and their tracks, scattered here and there, conform closely to the progressive direction of the main storm.

For example, on Feb. 19, 1884, forty-four tornadoes occurred in Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina, but principally in Georgia and Alabama. They developed at a distance of 500 to 2,000 miles from a storm-center that moved across the northern part of the United States, beginning at the northern extremity of the Rocky Mountains in Montana, thence south-easterly through Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin to northern Illinois and Indiana, northward through Michigan, across Lake Huron, disappearing north of Quebec.

This sudden sharp turn of the storm center southward into Illinois and Indiana. Seems to have relation to the unprecedentedly large number of tornadoes that developed not far from the south Atlantic coats, extending inland as far as southern Illinois and Indian. This southward lunge of a mass of cold, moist air seems to have caused the abnormal conditions of temperate and due point, and the high winds necessary to case the most tremendous exhibition of destructive, terrible tornado power ever recorded by the signal service.

This invariable location southeast of the storm center is one of the main peculiarities of tornado development upon which the predictions depend.

Popular Science Monthly

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source: The Christian Recorder, February 4, 1884
Top Image: Damage from a tornado which struck Fort Smith, Arkansas on the night of January 11, 1898. From NOAA Public Domain Photo Archive

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