Tag Archives: America in World War I
vauclaire-hospital-ward

American Women: What they have done to bring peace to the world

From time immemorial, the part of woman in war has been the hardest. It has been her lot to send her loved ones away as sacrifices on the altar of her country and to remain at home, torn by all the emotions that rend the spirit of mothers, wives and sweethearts. She has been forced in the ages past to await with fearful forebodings the news from the scenes of conflict; she has suffered the pangs of sudden bereavement, and has borne the consequent burdens in the future years.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

The success of any nation’s arms has been due largely to the fortitude of its women. What we of the present day know as morale and which is maintained by large organizations in and out of the army, was just as important a factor in the years that have gone as it is today. But then there were no well organized bodies to see to it that our soldiers were kept in good spirits and guided in the right paths. The burden of the task lay with the women of our country.

It was their bravery at the parting, their cheerfulness in adversity, their fortitude in bereavement, their happiness in victory which inspired men to do or die, and which has demonstrated that “they also serve who stand and wait.” The ancient Spartan mother said to her son when he left her to do battle for Sparta, “Return with your shield or on it.” Human nature has not changed a great deal in the last two thousand years, and although the mother of today does not say so in so many words to her son, when he goes forth to battle, “acquit yourself honorably or do not return home,” she teaches him from childhood the value of bravery and the wretchedness of the coward. (more…)


Camp Sherman News - April 10, 1919

A Report on the First Negro Signal Corps (1919)

Prior to this great war there had never been a negro in the signal or engineer branches of the army. When the matter of a colored division came up, there was some doubt as to the ability of the negro to qualify for the highly specialized branches of the service that go to make up an army division.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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Christmas_at_the_3rd_Northern_General_Hospital,_Sheffield,_1916_(9490957023)

Xmas to be Big Day in U.S. Army Hospitals (1919)

The War Department authorizes publication of the following from the Office of the Surgeon General:

Christmas in army hospitals will be a happy day for sick and wounded patients. A special Christmas dinner will be served and there will be other evidence of good in the form of decorations of winter greens, and in a number of cases there will be Christmas trees and special programs. Relatives and friends of the patients will not forget them in the matter of gifts. Every opportunity will be grasped in order to make the Christmas season this year as joyous and cheerful to the brave wounded men as it is possible to do.

At General Hospital No. 20, Whipple Harracks, Arizona, a Christmas tree will be provided for the patients at the Red Cross house on Christmas Eve. Christmas carols will be sung by the nurses and reconstruction aides in all the wards on Christmas morning. Local talent is arranging to entertain the patients at a good vaudeville show at the hospital, and a movie program for Christfas week is being arranged by the Red Cross. On Christmas day a party and dinner is being planned, to be attended by all patients and those on duty at the hospital.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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ww1-air-and-eyes

The Eye and Aviation (1918)

By Capt Conrad Berens, M. C .

Experience has shown that the men who wrote the first blake for the examination of the Aviator were wise when they demanded that the flier’s eyes be free from disease and that he should have normal sight, color vision and the power to judge distance quickly and accurately. In many instances where a waiver was granted for some ocular defect, serious and even fatal accidents have occurred to those very individuals in whose favor the waivers were granted.

Fortunately for those of us who are trying to keep the eyes in condition for flying, the necessity for keen vision, normal color vision and the proper coordination of the ocular muscles in the judgment of distance, is well recognized by the fliers; particularly by the men who have been over the lines. Many of the best fliers say that the two most important things in getting the Huns it to see him first and to shoot straighter than he does. Naturally, the eye plays the master part in both of these acts, although knowing how and where to look is also a factor. However, even though you know how and where to look you will be at a great disadvantage if you can’t see as well as your antagonist does. There is some confusion in the average mind as to the meaning of farsight and as the farsighted man does not necessarily see well at a distance, it is better to to use the scientific term hypermetropia in speaking of this condition. At first little attention was paid to hypermetropia but it was soon realized that the men who were very hypermetropia were in many cases unsafe as pilots, due the weakening effect of altitude, upon the muscles of the eyes and therefore extremely hypermetropia men are disqualified.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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Camp Bragg News

How the Doughboy Liked “Furrin” Travel

Your cosmopolitan doughboy who has shaken hands with the King of England, danced with the Princess of Roumania, learned the slang of a dozen nations and cocked a knowing eye at all the choicest sights of the Continent, may sound extremely sophisticated by cable, but wait until he strikes the United States and see what furrin travel has done for him! It has made him love, not Europe less, but home more, and he hardly tries to conceal his grand passion under a poker face, either. For he has been homesick and weary for months, and the Goddess of Liberty looks like an angel, and New York harbor like Heaven, to his fond eyes.

Spirit of the American Doughboy

Spirit of the American Doughboy

As a national asset, then, the soldier is perhaps our best citizen, and because the A. E. F. as a whole is rampantly enthusiastic about its homeland and her interests, America may look to her soldiers for real inspiration in citizenship. These are the men to put into our business life, as rapidly as they can be transplanted from army to civil jobs.

To make the transposition more simple and effective, the War Department through Col. Arthur Woods, Assistant to the Secretary of War, has set up the wheels of a giant machine, which is working night and day to co-operate with all employment agencies for the sake of the returned soldier who has no job. But more than that, this great employment system operates for the good of America. Col. Woods and his thousands of assisting committees believe in the doughboy and in his power of real achievement in the future national life of the United States.

Instead of seeing snakes and other reptiles, the bibulous tramp sees axes and wood saws.

Source: The Camp Bragg News – August 28, 1919

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.