Tag Archives: America in World War I
Christmas_at_the_3rd_Northern_General_Hospital,_Sheffield,_1916_(9490957023)

Xmas to be Big Day in U.S. Army Hospitals (1919)

The War Department authorizes publication of the following from the Office of the Surgeon General:

Christmas in army hospitals will be a happy day for sick and wounded patients. A special Christmas dinner will be served and there will be other evidence of good in the form of decorations of winter greens, and in a number of cases there will be Christmas trees and special programs. Relatives and friends of the patients will not forget them in the matter of gifts. Every opportunity will be grasped in order to make the Christmas season this year as joyous and cheerful to the brave wounded men as it is possible to do.

At General Hospital No. 20, Whipple Harracks, Arizona, a Christmas tree will be provided for the patients at the Red Cross house on Christmas Eve. Christmas carols will be sung by the nurses and reconstruction aides in all the wards on Christmas morning. Local talent is arranging to entertain the patients at a good vaudeville show at the hospital, and a movie program for Christfas week is being arranged by the Red Cross. On Christmas day a party and dinner is being planned, to be attended by all patients and those on duty at the hospital.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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ww1-air-and-eyes

The Eye and Aviation (1918)

By Capt Conrad Berens, M. C .

Experience has shown that the men who wrote the first blake for the examination of the Aviator were wise when they demanded that the flier’s eyes be free from disease and that he should have normal sight, color vision and the power to judge distance quickly and accurately. In many instances where a waiver was granted for some ocular defect, serious and even fatal accidents have occurred to those very individuals in whose favor the waivers were granted.

Fortunately for those of us who are trying to keep the eyes in condition for flying, the necessity for keen vision, normal color vision and the proper coordination of the ocular muscles in the judgment of distance, is well recognized by the fliers; particularly by the men who have been over the lines. Many of the best fliers say that the two most important things in getting the Huns it to see him first and to shoot straighter than he does. Naturally, the eye plays the master part in both of these acts, although knowing how and where to look is also a factor. However, even though you know how and where to look you will be at a great disadvantage if you can’t see as well as your antagonist does. There is some confusion in the average mind as to the meaning of farsight and as the farsighted man does not necessarily see well at a distance, it is better to to use the scientific term hypermetropia in speaking of this condition. At first little attention was paid to hypermetropia but it was soon realized that the men who were very hypermetropia were in many cases unsafe as pilots, due the weakening effect of altitude, upon the muscles of the eyes and therefore extremely hypermetropia men are disqualified.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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Camp Bragg News

How the Doughboy Liked “Furrin” Travel

Your cosmopolitan doughboy who has shaken hands with the King of England, danced with the Princess of Roumania, learned the slang of a dozen nations and cocked a knowing eye at all the choicest sights of the Continent, may sound extremely sophisticated by cable, but wait until he strikes the United States and see what furrin travel has done for him! It has made him love, not Europe less, but home more, and he hardly tries to conceal his grand passion under a poker face, either. For he has been homesick and weary for months, and the Goddess of Liberty looks like an angel, and New York harbor like Heaven, to his fond eyes.

Spirit of the American Doughboy

Spirit of the American Doughboy

As a national asset, then, the soldier is perhaps our best citizen, and because the A. E. F. as a whole is rampantly enthusiastic about its homeland and her interests, America may look to her soldiers for real inspiration in citizenship. These are the men to put into our business life, as rapidly as they can be transplanted from army to civil jobs.

To make the transposition more simple and effective, the War Department through Col. Arthur Woods, Assistant to the Secretary of War, has set up the wheels of a giant machine, which is working night and day to co-operate with all employment agencies for the sake of the returned soldier who has no job. But more than that, this great employment system operates for the good of America. Col. Woods and his thousands of assisting committees believe in the doughboy and in his power of real achievement in the future national life of the United States.

Instead of seeing snakes and other reptiles, the bibulous tramp sees axes and wood saws.

Source: The Camp Bragg News – August 28, 1919

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

English-Camp-Sherman

World War I: English for Americans in the Making

Classes Operated by the YMCA

The English for foreigner classes that are being operated throughout the division is one phase of a difficult phase of a difficult and strange process of assimilation and fusion of many races of men in a difficult time. Few men quite realize how very near the liberty of Europe lies to the hearts of a considerable part of our army— men drawn from every subject nation of Europe. It is fortunate that the United States has gone on record as standing for the liberation of the peoples of East and Southeast Europe. A surprising number of men from foreign countries have already become loyal, self-sacrificing soldiers in America’s cause, even though they do not yet understand our language.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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Behind the Lines

Pictorial: Behind the Lines of our Allies (1917)

This photo feature appeared in the May 24, 1917 edition of Frank Leslie’s Weekly. Frank Leslie’s Weekly, later often known as Leslie’s Weekly, actually began life as Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. Founded in 1855 and continued until 1922, it was an American illustrated literary and news publication, and one of several started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. John Y. Foster was the first editor of the Weekly, which came out on Tuesdays. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.

The ancient and honorable artillery horse

The army horse its patience and reliability all are familiar. This caravan is bringing to the fighting line a supply of ammunition. Across each animal’s back are hung ammunition bags and each horse’s load is 8 shells, besides canteens and other needed things.  Since the Germans in their retreat destroyed all roads, the supplying of the troops falls upon horses and mules until motors and trains can again be used.

The ancient and honorable artillery horse.

Squirrel or Poilu?

Nature provided a snug Retreat for this French soldier. A hole in the base of a hollow tree is a small but Cozy home, warm, dry and safe or as safe as anything can be on the Battlefront. Reading his mail. The Ingenuity of soldiers and making trench life bearable as been entrusted by many photographs of unique devices, invented in necessity, as substitutes for the conveniences of home.

Squirrel or Poilu?

Squirrel or Poilu?

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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