Tag Archives: American County Histories
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Pioneer History of Coos and Curry Counties

The Pioneer History of Coos and Curry Counties (Oregon) by Orvil Dodge is now searchable within Accessible Archives. This volume can be found in American County Histories: The West. The West includes local histories from Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. This collection is under active development and is growing quickly.

About the Author

This pioneer historian (Orvil Dodge) had an interesting and colorful life. He was born January 5, 1839, at Gerard, Pennsylvania. His mother, Deborah, died when he was two years old; his father, Norman, soon remarried. When he was five, Orvil moved to the home of his uncle, David Dodge, only to return to his father’s new home in Portage County, Ohio, a year later. In 1850, William Press, his grandfather, visited the family and took Orvil with him to Point Peter, New York. At age sixteen, Dodge journeyed to Fort Wayne, Indiana, where he became a stage driver. After a severe bout with malaria, he located in Sycamore, Illinois, where he married Alice Walrod.

Orvil and his wife crossed the continent to California by mule and horse team in 1860. They settled on the upper Sacramento River where Dodge operated a sawmill. Within three months the Indians in that region swept through the country, burning Dodge’s mill and his lumber piles. Discouraged but undaunted, Orvil moved on to Oregon, locating in Jackson County where he planned to become a gold miner.

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Ann Bailey

Mad Anne Bailey

Ann Bailey, one of the most picturesque characters in American border history, was known as “Mad Ann,” because of her waspish temper. Her maiden name was Dennis, and she was a native of Liverpool, England. Like many other persons of her time, she came to Virginia as an indentured servant, and paid the cost of her passage across the Atlantic by being bound into servitude for several years. During this period in her life she was at Staunton.

At the age of twenty-three she married James Trotter, who was killed nine years later in the battle of Point Pleasant. William Trotter, her only child, was born near the present village of Barber in 1767.

After Trotter was killed the widow resolved to avenge his death. She left her boy with Mrs. Moses Mann, put on masculine apparel, and became a hunter and scout. She rode a black horse that she called “Pool,” an abbreviation of Liverpool. Her other horse she named “Jennie Mann.”

It is said of Ann Bailey that she put more than one Indian out of the way. On one occasion her lead horse was stolen from her.

Source: A Centennial History of Alleghany County Virginia.

This chapter would not be complete without some mention of that eccentric and masculine woman, known to American border history as Mad Ann Bailey. She was given this name because of her irascible Welsh temper. Her maiden name was Dennis, and she was a native of Liverpool. She came to Staunton at the age of 13, and ten years later wedded James Trotter, who was killed at Point Pleasant. The pair had a son named William, who was born in 1767.

Ann Bailey left her child with Mrs. Moses Mann, a near neighbor, put on masculine apparel, and for several years was a hunter and scout. One of her reasons for adopting such an unfeminine career was to avenge the death of her husband. According to tradition she took more than one scalp.

Her most famous exploit was her relief of Fort Lee, which stood where the city of Charleston, West Virginia, afterward arose. The stockade was besieged by Indians, the powder gave out, and it was very dangerous for a courier to get past the assailants. But Mad Ann volunteered, rode swiftly on her horse “Liverpool” to Fort Union–now Lewisburg,–and came back with an extra horse with a fresh supply of powder. This was in 1791, when she was 49 years of age.

For a year or so, she lived in a hut on Mad Ann’s Ridge, on the south side of Falling Spring Run. On one occasion her black horse went on to Mann’s without his rider. A party from the stockade went out to follow the trail, and located Mad Ann by airholes in the snow. She had failed asleep, either from liquor or drowsiness.

According to Ann Royall, who knew her in her old age, she could both drink and swear.

Source: Annals of Bath County Virginia

More recent references spell her name as Anne instead of Ann. The Anne Bailey Elementary School in St. Albans, West Virginia, is named for “Mad Anne” Bailey as is the Daughters of the American Revolution chapter in Charleston, West Virginia and a lookout tower in Watoga State Park.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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The History of the City of Denver, Arapahoe County, and Colorado

History of the City of Denver, Arapahoe County, and Colorado

In presenting this, their first work west of the Missouri River, the publishers have no apology to make. In the preparation of the historical portion, they have employed Mr. W. B. Vickers, a gentleman whose well-known standing and ability as a writer are a sufficient guaranty of the thorough manner in which he has performed his task. In the biographical department, the large number of sketches inserted and the limited space to be devoted to each precluded any considerable attempt at literary elaboration; indeed, it was thought better to present the prominent points in the lives of a larger number than fulsome eulogies of a few. Owing to the indifference of some and the absence of others, which rendered it impossible to obtain the necessary data, a few biographies that would have been especially appropriate and desirable are necessarily omitted, in spite of the most constant and persevering efforts to make this department of the work complete.

To the great number of the people of Denver and vicinity who, by their information, advice and cordial support, have aided them in their efforts, the publishers and their assistants desire to express their earnest thanks; and, while absolute perfection is not claimed nor to be expected, they trust the present work will meet the approbation of the public, and prove a valuable exponent of the history, resources, development and present condition of the Centennial State and its capital city.

–O. L. BASKIN & CO.

Contents – Part One - Colorado

  • CHAPTER I. — Ringing up the Curtain
  • CHAPTER II. — Early Discoveries of Gold
  • CHAPTER III. — Journalism in Colorado
  • CHAPTER IV. — Early Politics and Organisation of the Territory
  • CHAPTER V. — Lo! the Poor Indian
  • CHAPTER VI. — The Mountains of Colorado
  • CHAPTER VII. — Colorado during the Rebellion, Territorial Officials
  • CHAPTER VIII. — Progress of the Country
  • CHAPTER IX. — Climate of Colorado
  • CHAPTER X. — Agricultural Resources of the State
  • CHAPTER XI. — Stock-raising in Colorado
  • CHAPTER XII. — Leadville and California Gulch
  • CHAPTER XIII. — History of the First, Colorado Regiment
  • CHAPTER XIV. — History of the Second Colorado Regiment
  • CHAPTER XV. — Sketch of the Third Colorado Regiment
  • CHAPTER XVI. — The Geology of Colorado
  • CHAPTER XVII. — Peek Climbing is the Rocky Mountains
  • CHAPTER XVIII. — Sketch of the San Juan Country and Dolores District
  • CHAPTER XIX. — The University of Colorado

Contents – Part Two – Arapahoe County and Littleton

  • CHAPTER I. — The Ute Rebellion
  • CHAPTER II. — Affairs at White River Agency
  • CHAPTER III. — The News in Denver
  • CHAPTER IV. — Advance upon the Agency
  • CHAPTER V. — Arrival Agency. The Massacre
  • CHAPTER VI. — Cessation of Hostilities — Rescue of the Prisoners
  • CHAPTER VII. — Sad Story of the Captives
  • CHAPTER VIII. — The Atrocities Colorado
  • CHAPTER IX. — The Peace Commission Farce
  • CHAPTER X. — The Ute Question lo Congress

Contents — Part Three – Denver

  • CHAPTER I — Wonderful Transformation of Twenty Years. A Prophecy
  • CHAPTER II. — Pen Picture of Dearer in 1869. The Pioneers.
  • CHAPTER III. — The Fall and Water Campaign
  • CHAPTER IV. — The City of bearer in 1860. Lot-Jumping, Etc.
  • CHAPTER V. — Denver in 1861
  • CHAPTER VI. — From 1862 to the Flood
  • CHAPTER VII. — The Great Flood of 1864
  • CHAPTER VIII. — After the Flood
  • CHAPTER IX. — Coming of the Railroads
  • CHAPTER X. — Events of the year 1869
  • CHAPTER XI. — The Railroad year 1870
  • CHAPTER XII. — Progress in the years 1871-72
  • CHAPTER XIII. — Denver from 1873 to 1875
  • CHAPTER XIV. — The Centennial Year
  • CHAPTER XV. — Denver in 1877-78-79
  • CHAPTER XVI. — Denver doling the year 1879
  • CHAPTER XVII. — The Public Schools
  • CHAPTER XVIII. — Railroads, The Denver Pacific
  • CHAPTER XIX. — Denver, South Park & Pacific
  • CHAPTER XX. — Denver & Grande Railway
  • CHAPTER XXI. — The Colorado Central Railroad
  • CHAPTER XXII. — The Telegraph and Street Railway
  • CHAPTER XXIII. — The Churches of Denver
  • CHAPTER XXIV. — The Sunday Schools of Denver
  • CHAPTER XXV. — Hill’s Smelting Works
  • CHAPTER XXVI. — Secret Benevolent Societies; Cemeteries; Brinker Collegiate Institute; Places of Amusement; The Fire Companies; The Military Companies; Denver Peculiarities
  • CHAPTER XXVII. — The Learned Professions

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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Typewriter_adler3

QWERTY Comes to Life

In the summer of 1868 Christopher Latham Sholes received a patent for an invention he called the “Type-Writer.” The first row was made of ivory and the second of ebony, the rest of the framework was wooden. It was in this form that Sholes, Glidden and Soule were granted patents for their invention on June 23, 1868 and July 14. The first document to be produced on a typewriter was a contract that Sholes had written, in his capacity as the Comptroller for the city of Milwaukee. Machines similar to Sholes’s had been previously used by the blind for embossing, but by Sholes’s time the inked ribbon had been invented, which made typewriting in its current form possible.

Sholes’ invention revolutionized the way offices operated. It was mentioned in the profile of Remington Rand, Inc. in History of Northwestern New York Erie, Niagara, Wyoming, Genesee and Orleans Counties Persons and Family History (Volume III) in our American County Histories collection.

Sholes Type-Writer

Sholes Type-Writer

From the Book

In 1914 Mr. Rand invented the world’s first visible record, a development of the visible index which eliminated costly and time-consuming fumbling through blind files and was destined to revolutionize the record keeping methods of modern business.

It was about this time that James H. Rand, Jr., eldest son of the senior Mr. Rand, organized the American Kardex Company in direct competition with his father’s business and established his plant and offices on Main Street, in Tonawanda, where the present Main Street Plant of Remington Rand, Inc., now stands. For ten years it was touch-and-go between father and son. But both businesses prospered and in 1925 were merged as the Rand Kardex Corporation. James H. Rand, Sr., became chairman of the board. James H. Rand, Jr., was made president and the interests and inventions of both companies were pooled in the new company.

It was the beginning of a period of growth and progress which has brought the company from the humblest of origins to the position of preeminence it now occupies in its field—the largest manufacturer of office equipment and supplies in the world.

In 1925, the Index Visible Company was purchased and the company merged with Library Bureautoform Rand Kardex Bureau. In 1927 the Remington Typewriter Company, Baker Vawter Company, Dalton Adding Machine Company, Powers Tabulating Machines Corp., Kalamazoo Loose Leaf Binder Company, Safe-Cabinet Company, and others were brought together to form Remington Rand, Inc., with twenty-four plants, offices in every principal city of the United States, and, before the war, in most foreign countries. (more…)

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ar139900

Georgia Colony’s Trustee Notes

On June 9, 1732 James Oglethorpe was granted a royal charter for the colony of the future U.S. state of Georgia.

Historical Collections of Georgia: Containing the Most Interesting Facts, Traditions, Biographical Sketches, Anecdotes, Etc. Relating to Its History and Antiquities, from Its First Settlement to the Present Time. Compiled from Original Records and Official Documents. Illustrated by Nearly One Hundred Engravings in our American County Histories: Georgia collection contains many of the papers documenting the colony’s early days.

Extracts from the minutes of the trustees:

The compiler has examined the Minutes of the Trustees for the Establishment of the Colony of Georgia, and made the following extracts:

PALACE COURT, OLD PALACE YARD,
WESTMINSTER, July 20, 1732.

The LORD VISCOUNT PERCIVAL, being met by THOMAS TOWER, JAMES VERNON GEORGE HEATHCOTE, JAMES OGLETHORPE, ROBERT HUCKS, WM. BELITHA. ROBERT MORE, Esqrs., ARTHUR BEAFORD, SAMUEL SMITH, Clerks; Capt. THOMAS CORAM., and ADAM ANDERSON, Gent., in pursuance to the following summons, issued by his lordship to them, and all other the trustees for establishing the Colony of Georgia in America, viz:

Sir, — His Majesty having been graciously pleased by his charter bearing date 9th June, 1732, to appoint you to be one of the Common Council, and one of the trustees for establishing the colony of Georgia, in America; and by same charter I am enjoined to cause summons to be issued to the several trustees therein particularly named, to meet at such time and place as I shall appoint, to consult about and transact the business of the said corporation. In obedience to the injunction of the charter, I therefore summon you to meet the rest of the trustees, at their office in Palace Court, old PALACE YARD, at four of the Clock, in the afternoon on the 20 July, 1732, to transact the business of the said corporation.

His Lordship produced the following certificate:

July 7, 1732. — These are to certify, that the right Hon. the Lord Viscount Percival, of the kingdom of Ireland, came this day before me, and took the following oath, as President of the trustees, for establishing the colony of Georgia, in America: –

I do swear that I will, well and truly, execute the office of President of the trustees for establishing the colony of Georgia, in America, to the best of my skill and knowledge. So help me God.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand.

His Lordship then proceeded to administer the said oath, the word President being only changed for that of Common Councilman, to Thomas Tower, James Vernon, George Heathcote, James Oglethorpe, Robert Hucks, Wm. Belitha, and Robert More, Esqs., being common councilmen of the said corporation.

Letters were produced to the trustees, from divers noblemen and gentlemen, and also from the corporation of Liverpool, testifying their desire to forward this design, and to accept of commissions for collecting benefactions for that purpose.

Ordered: That the thanks of the trustees be returned, and that Commissions for the said persons be prepared, in pursuance to their desire.

Wm. Purry, the Leader, and Wm. Binmong, the Minister, and others, the elders of the Swiss Congregation, intending to build a town to be called by the name of Purrisburg, on the northern side of the Savannah river, in South Carolina, came and thanked the trustees for the protection they had already afforded them, and to desire that a good correspondence and friendship might be maintained between them, and such colonies as the said trustees should settle, in the Province of Georgia.

The trustees gave them thirteen guineas, for the relief of the sick, and childbearing women in their passage, being the private benefaction of Mr. George Heathcote, and Mr. Belitha, for that purpose.

His Lordship being President, this first meeting adjourned to Thursday, July 27, 1732.

July 27. — At this meeting a book of by-laws was ordered, and the Charter to be wrote in the beginning of it. Mr. Vernon reported that the petition of the trustees had been received by his Majesty, and a proposal was drawn up to transport a number of the Saltzburghers exiles.

August 3, 1732. — Gen. Oglethorpe reported the names of many persons desirous of encouraging the colony.

Aug. 10, 1732. — Committee, viz: Oglethorpe, Healthcote, Tower, More, Hucks, Laroche and Vernon, to propose laws for the regulation of the Colony.

August 31, 1732. — Jacob Winckler, Theobald Keiffer, Ludwig Roel, and other German Swiss, being laborers and vine dressers, attended and received from Lord Carpenter and Mr. Oglethorpe three guineas towards furnishing them with tools: they, with their families, being the first Germans that are to establish the town of Purrisburgh.

September 21, 1732. — Received a receipt from the bank for £252, benefaction from the Bank of England.

November, 2, 1732. — Seal fixed to a grant for erecting a Court of Judicature in Savannah.

November 8, 1732. — Benefactions acknowledged. Dr. Henry Herbert offered to go to Georgia, without any assistance, to perform all religious services. — Accepted.

Nov. 16, 1732. — On board the frigate Ann, Capt Thomas, mustered the passengers on board; and computed the freight of them to 91 heads.

Nov. 23, 1732. — Read copies of letters from Horatio Walpole, Esq., to his deputies; from the Duke of Newcastle, to the Governors of South Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New-York, New-England, Barbadoes, &c., for their assistance to Mr. Oglethorpe, on his voyage. A common seal to be affixed to a power of attorney, to James Oglethorpe, to appoint such commander or other officer or officers, as he may think proper, to train and exercise the militia in Georgia.

Dec. 14, 1732. — Names of persons to be sent to Georgia, to be printed in one of the public papers, once a fortnight, before their embarkation.

Dec. 21, 1732. — Mr. Quincy attended, with a recommendation to go over as a missionary to Georgia.

Jan. 10. 1732-3. — Mr. Abercrombie, Attorney-General of South Carolina, delivered in claims of people in South Carolina, to lands said to be run out by them on the south side of the Savannah River. He is informed that trustees were disposed to act justly to all persons, but that this affair could not receive immediate attention.

Jan. 17, 1732-3. — A letter to be wrote to Sir Thomas Lambe, desiring his opinion of raising silk in Georgia.

February 21, 1732-3. — Received from Lady Osbom, £50 towards building a church in Georgia.

February 28, 1732-3. — A letter read from Mr. Oglethorpe, giving an account of his safe arrival at Charlestown, and the health of the colony, having lost in the passage but one person, a child aged eight months.

April 11, 1733. — Names of all those who go to Georgia paying their own expenses, shall be published in one of the newspapers.

April 18, 1733. — Received by the hands of the Rev. Mr. Samuel Wesley, a silver chalice and patine for the use of the first church in Savannah, the gift of an unknown benefactor.

April 30, 1733. — A petition to the House of Commons for a supply was read, and approved of.

August 11,1733. — Read a letter of attorney for receiving of the treasury £10,000 granted by Parliament.

Read a letter from Mr. Oglethorpe, with an account of the death of several persons in Georgia, which he imputed to the drinking of rum. Resolved, that the drinking of rum in Georgia be absolutely prohibited, and that all which shall be brought there be staved.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.

Accessible Archives subscribers can find several more years of extracts from the minutes of the trustees in Historical Collections of Georgia: Containing the Most Interesting Facts, Traditions, Biographical Sketches, Anecdotes, Etc. Relating to Its History and Antiquities, from Its First Settlement to the Present Time. Compiled from Original Records and Official Documents. Illustrated by Nearly One Hundred Engravings in our American County Histories: Georgia collection.

Map Details:  A draught of South Carolina and Georgia from Sewee to St. Estaca.  Scale ca. 1:450,000. Oriented with north to the left. Depths shown by soundings. Annotated in ink “M(232)4 H87.” Includes “Instructions for the coast of South Carolina, Georgia, and the coast of St. Augustin.”

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