Tag Archives: American County Histories
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Historical Reporting on the Climate of the Hawaiian or Sandwich Islands

Students and researchers will find the American County Histories a treasure trove of detailed information and recollections on weather and climate of a particular region.  Disasters that a region has suffered, especially violent storms, extended weather patterns and other natural disasters are well documented in these histories.

Explorers, missionaries, sea captains, and settlers maintained climate and weather records – to determine favorable winds, for agricultural reasons, to know when inland waterways were usable, to prepare for settlement, and more.

The excerpt below highlights observations on the climate in the Hawaiian Islands by a New England missionary and member of the American Oriental Society. His first-hand observations provide a unique look at Hawaiian weather, including temperature changes, rainfall, climatic changes in terms of elevation, Hawaiian folklore names for winds, and more.

The climate is salubrious, and possesses a remarkable evenness of temperature, so much so that the language has no word to express the general idea of weather. Remarkable changes, such as a severe storm, or long periods of rain, which on the more populous portions are of rare occurrence, only attract notice. Situated in the midst of the Pacific, the heat produced by a tropical sun is mitigated by the breezes which blow over the wide expanses of ocean, and the shores on either side show but little difference in the results of the thermometer. Physiologists give a certain point of temperature as most conducive to health and longevity. The mean heat of these islands approaches near to it, and is highly favorable to the full development and perfection of animal economy.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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History of Adair County

A Look Inside the History of Adair County, Missouri

County histories have long formed the cornerstone of local historical and genealogical research. Encyclopedic in scope and virtually limitless in their research possibilities, they provide a wealth of information for researchers of all types as well as for general interest readers.  Our American County Histories Collection is rapidly expanding to cover the early history of all fifty states.

Take a look inside this new volume added in October 2016. This is History of Adair County: Together with Reminiscences and Biographical Sketches by E. M. Violette, Professor of History, State Normal School, Kirksville, Mo.

Preface

As the title of this work suggests, the responsibility for its contents is divided. For Part First I alone am responsible; for the other parts, I am in no wise responsible, as they were composed and edited by other hands.

When asked by the Denslow History Company a year and a half ago to write an historical sketch of Adair County, I thought I appreciated somewhat the nature of the task, and consented to do it only after giving the matter some consideration. But I did not think it would entail as much labor as it actually has. I undertook it with the avowed intention of doing my best to make the History of Adair County somewhat different from the ordinary county histories. To do that meant a great deal of investigation which may never appear to the general reader as having ever been made. While carrying on some of my investigations I was frequently advised by different ones not to spend so much time upon them, and I was frequently told that the only readers of the book would be those whose biographical sketches constitute the last part and that they would be interested only in their own biographies. It may be that the historical part will attract very few, but whether that be the case or not, I have the personal satisfaction of having endeavored to do the work thoroughly all the way through.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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A Local View on America in the World War I Era

World War I greatly impacted all levels of American society. Industrial production increased, employment rose dramatically along with incomes, and cities and counties flourished. The Great Migration of African-Americans from the south to northern manufacturing cities reached its peak and when the U.S. entered the war, factories turned to women as a labor source. During this time as industry boomed, so did the economy. Under the President’s call for mobilization in 1916, State National Guard units were activated for service and state and local civilian organizations were created to carry out the activities of Federal agencies and committees.

11th District of the 14th Region, War Industries Board Resource and Conversion Section

11th District of the 14th Region, War Industries Board Resource and Conversion Section

As the war ended, and soldiers returned home, industrial production began to slow, and there was less need for workers in factories.  Many women stopped working, but even so, there were not enough jobs for soldiers returning home from Europe.  This rising unemployment after a time of industrial and economic prosperity planted the seeds of economic and social strife in urban and rural areas.

You will find military histories of Tulsa units, their military operations in Europe and Mexico, and lists of officers and those that died in the service. Maybe more interesting, you can find detailed information on the home front –civilian activities in support of military units raised locally, Federal, state and local governmental agencies and organizations, roles of women in the mobilization and war effort, maintenance of the economy, and efforts to protect the local population from radical and enemy propaganda .

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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Family Car Camping, Harris & Ewing, photographer between 1915 and 1923

Auto Camping in the American West

August is the traditional car vacation month and this year is no different. With millions of drivers and families checking out national parks, monuments, American backroads, and various types of amusements, many towns, cities, and toll roads will see an increase in revenue (as well as population).

As America became more mobile during the 1910s and 1920s, Americans ventured out on America’s roads.. Many heeded Horace Greeley’s advice to “Go west…” and like the pioneers of old, they explored the back roads and towns of western America.  On the way, travelers with limited budgets or who wanted to experience the fresh air of the countryside, outfitted their cars with camping equipment. Others, realized that towns were few and far between and so needed an alternative to a hotel.

Family Car Camping, Harris & Ewing, photographer between 1915 and 1923

Family Car Camping, Harris & Ewing, photographer between 1915 and 1923

Early on towns were skeptical of these “auto gypsies” and farmers and ranchers were concerned with these short-time squatters on their lands. Some folks camped on roadsides, but this proved dangerous in an era when speed limits and paved roads were almost non-existent.

By the early 1920s, towns realized the commercial opportunities in providing dedicated “auto camps,” where campers could patronize local stores for food and gas. Many towns in the West opened auto camps that provided a variety of free amenities, including fireplaces and showers.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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Talbot County

The Indians in Talbot County

Although prior to 1652, there were many Indian settlements, as still indicated by their banks of oyster shells, on points along the shores of the Choptank, Chester and Tred Avon rivers, it was in this year, being eight years prior to the founding of Talbot county, that a treaty was made with them, which is the first of which any record has been preserved and by which all of their lands on the Eastern Shore, north of the Choptank river, were ceded to the English.

This treaty was made at the river Severn, where the city of Annapolis was later located, and, tradition says, it was held under the old tulip-popular tree, still standing on the campus of St. John’s College. This treaty may be found, at length, in the appendix to Bozman’s History of Maryland, in which it is stated a blank occurs in the first article. A critical examination of the old council book will, however, convince any person familiar with the peculiar chirography of that time, that there is no blank in it, and that the word that Bozman says, in another place, is illegible, is in reality the word trees. The first article is as follows:

Article of peace and friendship treated and agreed upon the 5th day of July, 1652, between the English nation in the province of Maryland, on the one part, and the Indian nation of Susquesahanough on the other part, as followeth:

First, that the English nation shall have, hold and enjoy to them, their heirs and assigns, forever, all the land lying from the Patuxent river unto Palmer’s Island, on the Western side of the Bay of Chesepiake, and from Choptank river to the north east branch which lyes to the northward of Elks river, on the Eastern side of the said baye, with all the islands, rivers, creeks, tres, fish, fowle, deer, elke, and whatsoever else to the same belonging, excepting the Isle of Kent and Palmer’s Island, which belong to Capt. Clayborne. But, never the less it shall be lawful for the aforesaid English or Indians to build a house or forte for trade or any such like use or occasion at any tyme upon Palmers’ Island.

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