Tag Archives: Civil War
Plots and Counter Plots - Lincoln's Perils

Plots and Counter Plots – Lincoln’s Perils

All our readers are familiar with the tremendous conspiracies to take the life of the President elect, and to put out of the way at the same time all his suite, including a lachrymose colonel of dragoons, and a major of artillery who had already suffered in the cause of Old Abe to the extent of a disagreeable dislocation. Mr. Lincoln’s night ride to Washington will make hereafter a splendid incident for the theatre, while his Scotch cap will be as famous as the green turban of the Prophet, and his long military cloak be placed with the uniform of Washington in the Patent Office.

When the news of the plots arrived the country shivered in its shoes; when the country was informed that the second Washington had been safely enfolded in the protecting arms of Mr. Seward, the country took a long breath, and felt relieved. Subsequently, the country desired to know all the particulars of these terrible conspiracies, and wished to be informed why the triumphal tour of the President elect had been so suddenly interrupted.

Among other things, the country has been a good deal exercised about Wood, not Fernando, but W. S. Wood, who officiated as the Grand Chamberlain for Uncle Abe. Nobody seemed to know who Wood was or by whose authority he acted.

Part I of our Civil War collection, A Newspaper Perspective, contains articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York Herald, The Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.
(more…)


Capture-New-Orleans-OG

The Capture of New Orleans

The Civil War Collection Part I: A Newspaper Perspective contains major articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York Herald, The Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.  Since all major events are described in detail by both Union and Confederate newspapers, opposing perspectives are readily available for comparative evaluations.

This news item appeared in the The New York Herald on May 1, 1862.

The Capture of New Orleans – Its Effect Upon the Present War

The New York Herald - May 1, 1862

The New York Herald – May 1, 1862

The earlier accounts of the capture of the city of New Orleans were subject to grave doubt and speculation in Wall street, and stock operations were consequently very carefully carried on. The subsequent despatches have, however, so fully confirmed the fact that all the doubts of the Wall street men have vanished into thin air, and now they are among the staunchest believers in the return of the Crescent City to its old allegiance. The financiers have given the most practical proof of their belief by the rapid upward movement of stocks – the unfailing indicator of public confidence – which have ascended from ninety-three some days ago to nine-eight, at which point they now stand. This is the most decisive evidence that can be given of the satisfaction with which the cheering news is now received. Public confidence was never stronger in the final success of our arms, and the loss of New Orleans to the rebels is regarded as one of a fatal and concluding blow.

We are now only awaiting the full details of this most important victory, which will doubtless reach us in a very short time. As yet we have had no tidings of General Butler, who, nevertheless, must be somewhere in the neighborhood. At the proper time the people will hear from him. The great feat of the capture of the city seems to have been accomplished by Commodore Farragut, one of the most distinguished and accomplished naval officers of the United States. It is seldom that the annals of naval warfare record so brilliant and successful an exploit, conducted under circumstances of the greatest disadvantage, but resulting in honor and glory to the brave men who participated in it.

Part I of our Civil War collection, A Newspaper Perspective, contains articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York Herald, The Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.
(more…)


VA Secedes-OG

April 17, 1861: Virginia Votes to Secede!

On April 17, 1861, Virginia’s secession convention voted to secede from the United States and became the 8th member of the Confederate States of America.

This report on the decision and its immediate impact on the Commonwealth appeared in the Richmond Enquirer on April 18, 1861.


We have this morning to call attention to the bold and noble Proclamation of Governor Letcher. With calm dignity and determined purpose, the Executive of Virginia has spoken, and from the Atlantic to the Ohio every citizens of the State is prepared to sustain him. Gov. Letcher has fully met the expectations of the People of Virginia, and his patriotic efforts to protect his State will be fully sustained by all men in Virginia.

His reply to Simon Cameron is perfect. Short, dignified, and with bitter irony he condemns the weak and vacillating powers at Washington.

Men of Virginia, we thank God that nothing is necessary at this time to rouse you to action. Before the proclamation of Gov. Letcher was known, regiments and companies had been tendered to the Executive, and men were eager to enter the service of defending Virginia. Aggressing upon the rights of none, seeking no war. Virginia may be dragged from her efforts at peace and reconciliation by the usurpations of the Federal Executive. Her Convention has up to this time withstood every appeal to the Secessionists, and were quietly making efforts at reconstruction; her peace efforts are despised by the Federal Executive, and civil war inaugurated to bolster up the waning fortunes of a corrupt and imbecile Administration. The blood of the conflict rests upon Abraham Lincoln and his Cabinet.

Part I of our Civil War collection, A Newspaper Perspective, contains articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York Herald, The Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.
(more…)


cannon-south

The Question of Negro Soldiers in the South

This rather fascinating editorial about the issues surrounding arming slaves to fight for the south appeared on February 18, 1865. As all know, it never came to anything like full fruition, but it is interesting to see thoughts on the topic at a time when the South was in desperate need of a game-changing solution.

The Question of Negro Soldiers

(Richmond, Virginia – February 18, 1865) The question of negro soldiers we consider as settled. Public opinion has definitely declared in favor of arming the negroes; the resolution introduced in the Virginia Legislature, giving the consent of the State to the measure, will pass, and may be followed, and should be, by instructions to Senators to vote for the measure and thus put the matter at rest.

As to giving the slaves their freedom, this should be the reward for faithful services, at the end of the war, if desired by the slaves. To some it may be a boon, a reward – others may not even desire freedom. Negroes are divided in opinion as to whether they would prefer freedom to slavery, but by all means leave the choice with them, let them decide the matter. We do not expect this reward to make soldiers of them; discipline only will do that. It must be a discipline differing, very much, from that which now holds together, with loosened bands, the armies of the Confederate States. It must be a discipline sharp, severe, exacting, which first teaches them their duty and them compels them to perform it. There never has been discipline in the armies of this Confederacy, but instead thereof a kind of universal suffrage, which fights when it chooses and straggles when it feels like it. All this must be changed with the negro troops; they have not the motives that compel the white man to this fight; they must be kept up to the mark by fear of punishment more than by hope of reward.

Part I of our Civil War collection, A Newspaper Perspective, contains articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York Herald, The Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.
(more…)


Richmond-Cover

What will Virginia Do?

This is an excerpt from an editorial that ran in the Richmond Enquirer on April 9, 1861.  This periodical can be found in The Civil War Collection » Part I: A Newspaper Perspective.  A Newspaper Perspective contains major articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York HeraldThe Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.

What will Virginia Do?

This question is propounded to us from the North, the South, the East and the West. It is very properly viewed as a question the solution of which involves the most important consequences, not only to Virginia, but to the two competing Republics which now stand upon the ruins of the old Union.

The solicitude in regard to the future position of this hitherto renowned Commonwealth is therefore clearly explained. We are not authorized by Virginia to define the line of policy which she intends to adopt. No one can tell with infallible certainty the relations which she will hereafter sustain the governments respectively of the North and of the South. But our opinion as to the course she will pursue, and the reasons for that opinion, are candidly submitted to the anxious enquirer.

(more…)