Tag Archives: Content Sources

‘Defining Moment’ Drawing Prize Information

A few folks have asked about Personal Subscription prize we are giving to one of the people who submit their “defining moment in American history” on our Facebook page.

A Personal Subscription to Accessible Archives gives the holder access to the complete text in the collections listed below via our powerful search interface.  After a the winner receives their subscription they will use their personal login on the Accessible.com website to access the materials.

Browsing the Liberator by Page Image

Browsing the Liberator by Page Image

They can then search for specific words, names, locations, etc… within specific collections or across ALL collections.  They also have the option to browse the collection day by day, book by book, in text form as extracted from these primary sources or, in most cases, by viewing high resolution images of the original pages.

These two methods, combined, make it easy to gain a deeper understanding of the materials since it is easier to read the material as text while also looking a the images to put the news and information in its proper historical context the way people living at the time would see it.

The list below contains the full listing of our current collections.  The one year Personal Subscription winner will also have access to any and all new materials added over the course of the next year.

If you have not yet entered the drawing, it is very easy to do so.  Just visit this status update on Facebook and tell us what you think is the ‘defining moment’ in American History in a comment.  There are no right or wrong answers since this is just each person’s opinion.  On July 5th we will select, at random, one of people who commented on that status update and they will win the Personal Subscription.

For more information see Drawing: The Defining Moment in American History.

 

The Civil War Collection

Coverage in relation to the Civil War is both informative and eclectic. In-depth articles discuss trade with foreign countries, and how their governments viewed the United States in light of the Civil War. There is information on specific industries of the time, such as the oyster trade in New York. Slavery is an important topic, and countless editorials discuss pre- and post-war attitudes from both sides, as well as troop movements during the war.

  • Part I: A Newspaper Perspective
  • Part II: The Soldiers’ Perspective
  • Part III: The Generals’ Perspective
  • Part IV: A Midwestern Perspective
  • Part V: Iowa’s Perspective

American County Histories

These books include chapters with detailed coverage of local history, geology, geography, weather, transportation, lists of all local participants in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, government, the medical and legal professions, churches and ministers, industry and manufacturing, banking and insurance, schools and teachers, noted celebrations, fire departments and associations, cemeteries, family histories, health and vital statistics, roads and bridges, public officials and legislators, and many additional subject areas.

Mid-Atlantic States

  • Delaware
  • Maryland
  • New Jersey
  • New York I – Southeast
  • New York II – Central
  • New York III – West
  • New York IV – North
  • Pennsylvania I – East
  • Pennsylvania II – Central
  • Pennsylvania III – Southwest
  • Pennsylvania IV – Northwest

New England States

  • Connecticut
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • New Hampshire
  • Rhode Island
  • Vermont

The Virginia Gazette, 1736–1780

The Virginia Gazette was the first newspaper published in Virginia and the first to be published in the area south of the Potomac River in the colonial period of the United States. Issues have the following subtitle: “Containing the freshest advices, foreign and domestick”.

Published weekly in Williamsburg, Virginia between 1736 and 1780, The Virginia Gazette contained news covering all of Virginia and also included information from other colonies, Scotland, England and additional countries.

  • Part I: 1736-1745
  • Part II: 1746-1755
  • Part III: 1756-1765
  • Part IV: 1766-1775
  • Part V: 1776-1780

African American Newspapers

This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day, including the Mexican War, Presidential and Congressional addresses, Congressional abstracts, business and commodity markets, the humanities, world travel and religion.

  • The Christian Recorder
  • The Colored American/Weekly Advocate
  • Frederick Douglass’ Paper
  • Freedom’s Journal
  • The National Era
  • The North Star
  • Provincial Freeman

Godey’s Lady’s Book (1830–1898)

This collection provides the complete run of Godey’s Lady’s Book, and is the only one containing the color plates as they originally appeared. The Accessible Archives search and retrieval system allows searchers to limit by “Image Type,” which includes chromolithograph, color plate and color plate fashion, as well as advertisement, cartoon, drawing, engraving, fashion plate, illustration, map, mezzotint, portrait, sheet music, table and woodcut.

The Liberator (1831–1865)

On January 1, 1831 the first issue of The Liberator appeared with the motto: “Our country is the world—our countrymen are mankind.” Garrison was a journalistic crusader who advocated the immediate emancipation of all slaves and gained a national reputation for being one of the most radical of American abolitionists.

After the end of the Civil War in December, 1865, Garrison published his last issue of The Liberator, announcing “my vocation as an abolitionist is ended.” After thirty-five years and 1,820 issues, Garrison had not failed to publish a single issue. He spent the final 14 years of his life campaigning for woman’s suffrage, pacifism and temperance.

Browsing The Liberator

Browsing The Liberator

The Pennsylvania Gazette (1728–1800)

Published in Philadelphia from 1728 through 1800, The Pennsylvania Gazette is considered The New York Times of the 18th century.

On October 2, 1729, Benjamin Franklin and Hugh Meredith bought the paper. Franklin not only printed the paper but also often contributed pieces under aliases. His newspaper soon became the most successful in the colonies. This newspaper, among other firsts, would print the first political cartoon in America, “Join, or Die,” authored by Franklin himself. The Pennsylvania Gazette ceased publication in 1800, ten years after Franklin’s death.

The Pennsylvania Gazette is divided into four separate folios. The periods covered by these folios include:

  • Folio I: “Benjamin Franklin`s Newspaper” (1728–1750)
  • Folio II: “The French & Indian War” (1751–1765)
  • Folio III: “The American Revolution” (1766–1783)
  • Folio IV: “The New Republic” (1784–1800)

The Pennsylvania Genealogical Catalogue

This database primarily is a listing of marriages, deaths and obituaries from the Village Record, published in West Chester, Pennsylvania. Also included, however, is information about emigration patterns, customs and traditions, important events, medical history, biographical data, and more.

The Pennsylvania Newspaper Record: Delaware County (1819–1870)

This database documents the move to industrialization from a predominantly agrarian culture established by Quaker farmers in the 18th century. The collection contains full-text transcriptions of articles, advertisements and vital statistics, providing insight into technology, business activity and material culture in a down-river milling and manufacturing community at the height of the Industrial Revolution.

This collection includes material from the following newspapers:

  • Delaware County American, Media, PA (1851–1871)
  • Delaware County Democrat, Chester, PA (two issues)
  • Delaware County Republican, Darby & Chester, PA (1833–1870)
  • The Post Boy, Chester, PA (few issues)
  • The Upland Union, Chester, PA (1825–1835; 1850–1852)

South Carolina Newspapers 1732–1780

This collection contains a wealth of information on colonial and early American History and genealogy, and provides an accurate glimpse of life in South Carolina and America, with additional coverage of events in Europe, during the early days of this country.

  • The South Carolina Gazette – 1732–1775
  • The South Carolina & American General Gazette – 1764–1775
  • The South Carolina Gazette & Country Journal – 1765–1775
  • The Gazette of the State of South-Carolina – 1777–1780
Comments Off
AA_FAQ

Accessible FAQs

Our recent posts have described the Accessible Archives collections in some detail. Here are a few Frequently Asked Questions about the collections.

This only a sample listing; visit Accessible.com to see the entire list.

  • What is the search platform like? Is Boolean searching available?
    The Accessible Archives search and retrieval system includes a host of features, including full Boolean search, field restriction, limiting, truncation & stemming, linking, browsing and sorting. All content is searchable via a unified interface.  A complete User Manual is available to explain the search interface.
  • Are the collections cover-to-cover or just particular articles?
    With regard to The Pennsylvania Gazette, only the articles that pertain to the Western Hemisphere are included. For newspapers covered in The Civil War: Part I: A Newspaper Perspective collection, only articles pertaining to the Civil War are covered. For the other collections, all articles and images are included. All advertisements are included, as well.
  • How is the material converted and how is accuracy assured?
    Content is double-keyed by a team of highly-skilled professionals familiar with the character and publishing idiosyncracies of historical documents. Double-keying results in much higher levels of accuracy than texts that have gone through OCR (Optical Character Recognition) scanning. Extensive quality control systems ensure that the converted data has an accuracy level in excess of 98%. The data are formatted in XML utilizing the TEI Lite DTD. Images are TIFF, B&W, color, and delivered as jpegs or gifs.
  • What states do you anticipate adding to American County Histories?
    American County Histories is currently divided into two groupings: Mid-Atlantic States (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania) and New England States (currently Connecticut & Massachusetts, with Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont available by the end of first quarter 2011). The intention is to cover the entire United States, offering the South as the next geographic region.
  • What differentiates Accessible Archives’ Godey’s Lady’s Book from other offerings?
    Our coverage provides the only fully searchable text version of this magazine with full-color illustrations—unique in the industry. In addition, the Accessible Archives search and retrieval system now allows searchers to limit by “Image Type,” which includes cartoon, chromolithograph, color plate, color plate fashion, drawing, engraving, fashion plate, illustration, map, mezzotint, portrait, sheet music, table and woodcut.
Comments Off
American County Histories

American County Histories to 1900

Most of these large county volumes were published between 1870 and 1900 and have long formed the cornerstone of local historical and genealogical research. They are encyclopedic in scope and virtually limitless in their research possibilities.

These books include chapters with detailed coverage of local history, geology, geography, weather, transportation, lists of all local participants in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, government, the medical and legal professions, churches and ministers, industry and manufacturing, banking and insurance, schools and teachers, noted celebrations, fire departments and associations, cemeteries, family histories, health and vital statistics, roads and bridges, public officials and legislators, and many additional subject areas. (more…)

Comments Off
Frederick_Douglass_greeting_African_Americans

African-American Newspapers

This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day, including the Mexican War, Presidential and Congressional addresses, Congressional abstracts, business and commodity markets, the humanities, world travel and religion. The collection also provides a great number of early biographies, vital statistics, essays and editorials, poetry and prose, and advertisements all of which embody the African-American experience.

The collection comprises the following newspapers:

  • The Christian Recorder (1861-1902) - The Christian Recorder embodied secular as well as religious material, and included good coverage of the black regiments together with the major incidents of the Civil War. The four-page weekly contained such departments as Religious Intelligence, Domestic News, General Items, Foreign News, Obituaries, Marriages, Notices and Advertisements. It also included the normal complement of prose and poetry found in the newspapers of the day.
  • The Colored American/Weekly Advocate (January 7, 1837–December 25, 1841) - On January 7, 1837 Phillip A. Bell began to publish a weekly newspaper called Weekly Advocate. From the beginning, one of the major goals of this newspaper was to educate its subscribers, and much information appeared in a list format including: principal railroads, lengths of rivers, heights of principal mountains, principal colleges in the United States and the principal features of various countries of the nations of the earth.  On March 4, 1837, issue number 9 of the newspaper was published under the new name of The Colored American, with Samuel E. Cornish as editor. The new motto was “RIGHTEOUSNESS EXALTETH A NATION,” and the paper was “…designed to be the organ of Colored Americans—to be looked on as their own, and devoted to their interests…
  • Frederick Douglass Paper (1851-1863) - By 1851 Frederick Douglass had become established as one of the most influential black leaders of the 19th century. In this year he changed the title of his Rochester based newspaper, The North Star, to that of the “Frederick Douglass’ Paper.” In an editorial, he wrote: “In respect to the Church and the government, we especially wish to make ourselves fully and clearly understood. With the religion of the one, and the politics of the other, our soul shall have no communion. These we regard as central pillars in the horrid temple of slavery. They are both pro-slavery; and on that score, our controversy with them is based.”
  • Freedom’s Journal (March 16, 1827–March 28, 1829) - Although Freedom’s Journal lived a relatively short life, it is important in that it was the first American newspaper written by blacks for blacks. From the beginning the editors felt, “… that a paper devoted to the dissemination of useful knowledge among our brethren, and to their moral and religious improvement, must meet with the cordial approbation of every friend to humanity…”.
  • The National Era (Complete, January 7, 1847–March 22, 1860)  - With Dr. Gamaliel Bailey, Jr., as editor, this newspaper was issued weekly in the District of Columbia for more than thirteen years.  Since John Greenleaf Whittier was an associate editor, much of his poetry, prose and editorials were included. With a continued heavy emphasis on literary reviews and commentaries it was the paper in which Uncle Tom’s Cabin was serialized.  The 1847 Prospectus for The National Era stated, “…While due attention will be paid to Current Events, Congressional Proceedings, General Politics and Literature, the great aim of the paper will be a complete discussion of the Question of Slavery, and an exhibition of the Duties of the Citizen in relation to it; …”
  • The North Star (Complete, December 3, 1847–April 17, 1851) - In 1847, with Frederick Douglass and M.R. Delaney as editors, The North Star was established: “…It has long been our anxious wish to see, in this slave-holding, slave-trading, and negro-hating land, a printing-press and paper, permanently established, under the complete control and direction of the immediate victims of slavery and oppression…”
  • Provincial Freeman (Complete, 1854-1857) - This weekly newspaper was edited and published by negroes in the Province of Canada West (now called Ontario) where many fugitive slaves from the United States had settled.  The Provincial Freeman was devoted to Anti-Slavery, Temperance and General Literature, and was affiliated with no particular Political Party. Its prospectus stated, “it will open its columns to the views of men of different political opinions, reserving the right, as an independent Journal, of full expression on all questions or projects affecting the people in a political way; and reserving, also, the right to express emphatic condemnation of all projects, having for their object in a great or remote degree, the subversion of the principles of the British Constitution, or of British rule in the Provinces.”
Comments ( 3 )

Pennsylvania Genealogical Catalog, Pennsylvania Newspaper Record, and South Carolina Newspapers

The Pennsylvania Genealogical Catalogue primarily is a listing of marriages, deaths and obituaries between 1818 and 1870 from the Village Record, published in West Chester, Pennsylvania. Also included, however, is information about emigration patterns, customs and traditions, important events, medical history, biographical data, and more.

The Pennsylvania Genealogical Catalogue


The Pennsylvania Newspaper Recorddocuments the move to industrialization from a predominantly agrarian culture established by Quaker farmers in the 18th century. The collection contains full-text transcriptions of articles, advertisements and vital statistics, providing insight into technology, business activity and material culture in a down-river milling and manufacturing community at the height of the Industrial Revolution.

It includes material from the following newspapers:

  • Delaware County American, Media, PA (1851–1871)
  • Delaware County Democrat, Chester, PA (two issues)
  • Delaware County Republican, Darby & Chester, PA (1833–1870)
  • The Post Boy, Chester, PA (few issues)
  • The Upland Union, Chester, PA (1825–1835; 1850–1852)

The Carolina Gazette

The Carolina Gazette contains a wealth of information on colonial and early American History and genealogy, and provides an accurate glimpse of life in South Carolina and America, with additional coverage of events in Europe, during the early days of this country.  The material is taken from the following 5 newspapers:

  • The South Carolina Gazette (1732-1775)
    South Carolina’s first successful newspaper was begun in 1732 and released its final issue in December, 1775. A “middle of the road” paper, the Gazette printed news of Europe, what the royalty had worn at the last formal event, news of the colony, notices of births, deaths, marriages and estate auctions, and advertisements, including those for runaway slaves. It contains a wealth of information on colonial/early American history and genealogy, and provides an accurate glimpse of life in South Carolina and America prior to the advent of the American Revolution.
  • The South Carolina & American General Gazette (1764-1775)
    Begun in 1764 by Robert Wells, it had many subscribers in other colonies by the mid-1770s, and was the only paper in the state to publish the full text of the Declaration of Independence. Ironically Wells, a loyalist, eventually was forced to leave the state.
  • The South Carolina Gazette & Country Journal (1765-1775)
    This publication was heavily pro-American and nearly always included scandalous stories of European royalty. While it tended to be “stuffy,” it was the only paper to discuss citizens who would not be considered among the elite in society.
  • The Gazette of the State of South-Carolina (1777-1780)
    One of several newspapers published in Charles Town, this paper was concerned primarily with regional happenings. It was established in 1777 by Peter Timothy, and was published by him and Nicholas Boden. Publication was suspended temporarily January 15–June 17, 1778, because the printing office was destroyed by fire.
  • The Charlestown Gazette (1779-1780)
    Printed weekly between 1778 and 1780 by Mary Crouch and Co., it was founded in special opposition to the Stamp Act, but also excelled at local news coverage while providing extensive listings of both marriages and deaths. Mary Crouch later moved to Salem, Massachusetts, where she continued publication for several years.
Comments Off