Tag Archives: Cooking

Thanksgiving Recipes from Godey’s Lady’s Book

Thanksgiving Day, is a holiday celebrated in the United States on the fourth Thursday in November. It has officially been an annual tradition since 1863, when, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens,” to be celebrated on Thursday, November 26. As a federal and popular holiday in the U.S., Thanksgiving is one of the major holidays of the year in America.

On October 6, 1941, both houses of the U.S. Congress passed a joint resolution fixing the traditional last-Thursday date for the holiday beginning in 1942. However, in December of that year the Senate passed an amendment to the resolution that split the difference by requiring that Thanksgiving be observed annually on the fourth Thursday of November, which was sometimes the last Thursday and sometimes (less frequently) the next to last.

Thanksgiving Receipts

Oyster Soup
Put two quarts of oysters, liquor and all,in a pan, set them on the stove to heat, but do not let them boil, or come very near to it. Now drain all the liquor into the soup kettle, and put in a pint of water and two quarts of new milk, half a pound of butter,and a little whole allspice and pepper. Have the oysters all this time where they will keep warm, and then salt to taste, just as you are ready to serve the soup, and put into the boiled up soup before the oysters are added. Salt should always be the last thing put into any soup, stew, or fricassee where milk is used, or it is apt to curdle. Oysters should never be boiled, but only scalded; boiling makes them tough and shrinks them up.

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Cookery for the Sick-Room III – November 1862

During the Civil War years Godey’s Lady’s Book carefully avoided taking a position or even directly mentioning the war from an editorial position.

However, there were many patriotic songs published and other peripheral items. This set of Sick-Room Remedies was published during the height of the war in 1862.

  • RICE BLANCMANGE — Steep a tablespoonful of rice in half a pint of cold milk for seven or eight hours. If the milk dries up too much, more must be added, but it must be no more than sufficient to make the rice soft and moist. Boil half an hour. Any flavor, either of almonds, lemon-peel, cinnamon, or nutmeg, may be added. When the rice is entirely pulped, it must be put into a mould until cold, when it will turn out.
  • ISINGLASS BLANCMANGE — An ounce of isinglass dissolved in a pint of boiling milk, and flavored with bitter almonds, lemon-peel, etc., if boiled for some time together, will form an agreeable nutritious blancmange for a convalescent. When put into a mould, it should be stirred occasionally until it begins to stiffen.
  • SAVORY MEAT JELLY — Chop a knuckle of veal and a scrag of mutton, so that they may be placed one bone on another. Scrape and slice three carrots and two turnips, cut small one head of celery, butter the bottom of a stone jar or well-tinned saucepan. Lay in layers the meat and vegetables alternately, packing them closely together. Sprinkle over each a very little salt; cover the jar closely, and put it in a slow oven for half an hour; then open it and pour in as much hot water as will cover the ingredients; cover the jar again closely, quicken the oven, and let it remain in it for five hours. Strain the liquor away from the meat and vegetables; when cold, remove the fat from the surface and the sediment from the bottom: the jelly will then be ready for use. It will not keep long unless boiled up again about the second day.
  • GLOUCESTER JELLY — Dissolve one ounce of isinglass in half a pint of spring water; bruise and add to it half an ounce of nutmeg and half an ounce of cinnamon; let all simmer in a pipkin until the isinglass be perfectly dissolved; strain it off, and set in a cool place to jelly; cut it in pieces, add a bottle of port wine and the spice before boiled in it; sweeten it to taste, and let it simmer until the jelly be again dissolved, when it is ready for use. Half a wineglass may be taken at bedtime. Observe, the wine must not be simmered in a saucepan, but in an earthen vessel, put into a saucepan of cold water, and set over the fire to warm gradually.
  • CARROGEEN, OR IRISH MOSS JELLY — Wash and pick an ounce of this moss; boil it in a pint and a half of water for twenty minutes; strain it and pour into a basin to jelly. For invalids, and for children when weaned, it is an excellent food mixed with warm milk.
  • ARROWROOT JELLY — Put into a saucepan and boil together half a pint of water and one glass of sherry, or a tablespoonful of brandy, a little grated nutmeg, and fine sugar. When boiling, mix with them by degrees a dessertspoonful of arrowroot, previously rubbed smooth in a tablespoonful of cold water; boll all together for three minutes, and then pour it into glasses or small cups. If the invalid is not allowed to take wine, the jelly may be flavored with lemon or orange juice, or with the juice of any fruit which may be in season.
  • APPLE WATER — Slices of apple, and a little lemon-peel and sugar put into hot water, make a pleasant drink.

Source

Collection: Godey’s Lady’s Book
Publication: Godey’s Lady’s Book
Date: November 1862
Title: Cookery for the Sick-Room
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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Cookery for the Sick-Room II – October 1862

During the Civil War years Godey’s Lady’s Book carefully avoided taking a position or even directly mentioning the war from an editorial position.

Many patriotic songs and poems were published during those years. This set of Sick-Room Remedies was published during the height of the war in 1862.

  • LEMON WATER — Cut into an earthen teapot, or a covered jug, two or three slices of lemon, with one lump of sugar, and a spoonful of capillaire. On these pour a pint of boiling water, and cover it closely for two or three hours, when it will form an agreeable beverage for the thirst of a feverish patient.
  • RASPBERRY VINEGAR — A dessert spoonful of which, in a tumbler of cold water, forms a very efficacious gargle.
  • TAMARINDS and hot water, when cool, may in some cases be given; but no acid drinks should be given to patients without the knowledge of their medical attendants.
  • WHITE-WINE WHEY — Dilute half a pint of new milk with an equal quantity of hot water; boil both together, and while boiling pour in at the moment two wineglasses of white-wine. A curd will form, which, after boiling the mixture for two or three minutes longer, will settle at the bottom of the saucepan. The whey must be strained carefully from the curd; it should be perfectly clear. Sugar may be added to please the taste. Warm white-wine whey promotes perspiration, and hence is useful in the commencement of some complaints; but taken cold, it has a different effect, and often, in cases of low fever, it is an excellent beverage; also, in the early stages of convalescence, it is as safe and sufficient a stimulant as can be given.
  • MILK WHEY — Steep in a cup of hot water, for four or five hours, a small piece of rennet, about an inch and a half square. Pour the water, not the skim itself, into two quarts of new milk. When the curd is come, pour it into a sieve or fine earthen colander, and press the whey gently out of it into a jug. This may be given either cool, or made the warmth of new milk, whichever the patient prefers.
  • LEMON AND VINEGAR WHEYS — Instead of wine, pour into the boiling milk and water a tablespoonful of lemon-juice or of vinegar. The whey obtained in this manner, being less stimulating than that of white-wine, is sometimes given to an invalid in preference.
  • GROUND RICE MILK — Rub a spoonful of ground rice, very smooth, in a little cold milk; add to it three half pints of milk, some cinnamon, lemon-peel, and a little nutmeg; boil altogether for a quarter of an hour. Sweeten to the taste.
  • SAGO MILK — Wash in cold milk a tablespoonful of sago, pour off the milk, and add to the sago a quart of new milk. Boil slowly till reduced to a pint. Cinnamon may be added if required; but neither sugar nor spice is usually added to this food.
  • ARROWROOT AND MILK — Mix smooth, with a very little cold milk, one dessert spoonful of arrowroot. Boil half a pint of new milk, and the moment it rises to the boiling point, stir in gently the arrowroot and cold milk. Boil it till it becomes thick.
  • MILK PORRIDGE is sometimes made by adding milk to fine groat gruel. Another way is to mix a tablespoonful of oatmeal in a basin with cold milk, and pour it, when perfectly smooth, into a saucepan containing half a pint of boiling milk. If this does not thicken it sufficiently, it must be boiled a little longer.

Source

Collection: Godey’s Lady’s Book
Publication: Godey’s Lady’s Book
Date: October, 1862
Title: Cookery for the Sick-Room
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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Cookery for the Sick-Room I – September 1862

During the Civil War years Godey’s Lady’s Book carefully avoided taking a position or even directly mentioning the war from an editorial position.

However, there were many patriotic songs published and other peripheral items. This set of Sick-Room Remedies was published during the height of the war in 1862.

Animal broths, jellies, and cooling drinks.

  • BEEF TEA should not be made like common gravy or broth, but by a process which will prevent the fat mingling with it. Cut half a pound of nice gravy-meat into thin slices, and lay them in a hollow dish, pouring over them a pint and a half of boiling water; cover the dish, and place it near the fire for half an hour; remove the tea into a saucepan, and boil it ten minutes over a quick fire; remove the scum which has risen in boiling; let it stand covered ten minutes longer; strain off, and season with salt only. Beef tea thus made is a light and useful nourishment to those whose stomachs are weak and irritable.
  • VEAL TEA is made in the same way, and in the same proportions of meat and water as beef tea.
  • CHICKEN TEA — Cut into small pieces a chicken, skin it very carefully, and remove any fat which may be visible. Boil it twenty minutes in a quart of water; pour the broth away from the meat before it gets cold. This tea is generally given in cases of debility after fevers, and at the commencement, in an invalid, of a state of convalescence.
  • EXTRACT OF MEAT — When the pure juice of meat is to be given to invalids, it may be obtained by putting a little lean beef or mutton, cut small, into a glass bottle, corking it up and tying a bladder over the cork; the bottle must then be put into hot water, and boiled gently for an hour. On opening it, a small quantity of real gravy may be poured away from the meat.
  • EGG MULLED, IN TEA OR COFFEE — Beat the yolk of an egg very well, in a tea or coffee cup stir into it a little milk or cream; then pour on it, stirring it all the time, hot coffee or tea, sufficient to fill the cup. If the hot liquid is poured in too hastily, or without stirring it at the time, the egg will curdle, instead of uniting with the tea. Invalids are recommended to try this mixture for breakfast, as being light and nourishing, without being heating.
  • EGG DRAUGHT, for a Convalescent — Beat the yolk of a fresh-laid egg, and mix with it a quarter of a pint of new milk, previously warmed over the fire; add to this a spoonful of capillaire, one of rose-water, and a little nutmeg.
  • SAVORY MEAT JELLIES for Convalescents — Take the bones and gristle of a knuckle of veal, with about a pound of the meat, the scrag-end of a neck of mutton, half an ounce of isinglass, two blades of mace, a little salt, and a gallon of water. Boil it gently (scumming it very carefully) for five hours, or longer if not reduced to about a quart. Do not put the isinglass and mace in till the scumming is done. Strain the jelly away from the ingredients, and when cold remove the fat from the surface. A stiff jelly is thus procured, which is agreeable if eaten cold; if warm, milk or wine may be mixed with it.
  • WINE JELLY — One quart of sherry, in which dissolve two ounces of isinglass (picked and broken into small pieces), two ounces of white sugar-candy (pounded), one nutmeg grated, one pennyworth of gum Arabic finely pounded. Put these ingredients together in an earthen jar, and the jar into a vessel of water; must be suffered to warm gradually. When the isinglass and gum Arabic are dissolved, strain the whole into a basin or deep dish, keep it dry and cool, and let the invalid have a piece about the size of a nutmeg a few times a day.

Source

Collection: Godey’s Lady’s Book
Publication: Godey’s Lady’s Book
Date: September 1862
Title: Cookery for the Sick-Room
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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