Tag Archives: Frank Leslie’s Weekly
Port of Havana-Cover

Visiting the Port of Havana in 1856

The American going to Cuba for the first time anxiously watches for the first glimpse of the famed “gem of the Antilles.” The announcement of “land in sight,” calls him to the deck; presently there looms up upon the clear atmosphere, a number of snowy white spots, which rapidly gain solidity, and take shape.

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

First are made out the frowning walls of Moro Castle and Light House. To the right is the Punta, in front of which was executed the unfortunate Lopez. Beyond is the fortress of Cabana, one of the strongest in the world. Such are the individual peculiarities of our faithful picture of the entrance of the port of Havana.

Every vessel entering is telegraphed, and such houses as do not command a view of the Moro, reflect the signals by means of looking-glasses affixed to some lofty part of the premises.

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

In the central distance of the view is the fort of Aratas, where the fifty Americans under command of Crittenden, and attached to the Lopez expedition, were barbarously shot by the Havana authorities. To the left is the Prince’s fort, and below is the suburb of Jesse Maria.

Part of the harbor of Havana is shown, and on the right the view of a part of the city. The friends of Crittenden contemplate erecting a magnificent monument to his memory in front of the fort of Aratas, the moment the island is in possession of the United States.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
Source: Frank Leslies Weekly, February 9, 1856


Inaugurations-OG

Memorable Presidential Inaugurations

As the presidential inauguration fast approaches, let’s take a quick look back at some presidential inaugurations that were “memorable.” Frank Leslie’s Weekly provided unique reporting, complete with graphics and later photographs, of several presidential inaugurations during its publishing run.

Comparing early presidential inaugurations with contemporary ones, was a common feature in Leslie’s Weekly.

Check out the article below, entitled “Some of the Most Memorable Presidential Inaugurations,” and then tune into the upcoming inauguration.

Presidential Theodore Roosevelt Delivering His Inaugural Address, March 4, 1905

Presidential Theodore Roosevelt Delivering His Inaugural Address, March 4, 1905

Some of the Most Memorable Presidential Inaugurations

By Charles M. Harvey

When, on April 30th, 1789, George Washington was inaugurated as the first President of the United States, the country had only eleven States (for North Carolina and Rhode Island did not ratify the Constitution or come under the government until many months afterward), all of which were east of the Alleghanies and north of Florida, which was Spanish territory until a third of a century later. New York City, then the national capital, with its 4,000,000 inhabitants in 1905, has 1,000,000 more people and many billions more wealth to-day than the entire United States had at that time. Yet April 30th, 1789, was the proudest day which New York City had seen in the century and two-thirds which had passed since Peter Minuit, representing Maurice of Nassau, the Stadtholder of Holland, bought the island of Manhattan from the Lenni-Lenape Indians for a gift of sixty guilders, or twenty-four dollars, in beads and ribbons, and started the colony of New Amsterdam on its picturesque career.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Frank Leslie - The Meaning of Christmas - Featured

The Meaning of Christmas

The holiday season is upon us! Schools will be closing shortly and students will be looking forward to some time with family and friends.  I can remember when I was a child that our last class assignment before the holidays was to write a paragraph on the meaning of Christmas. Most of the students in class focused on the toys and food, Santa Claus and his chimney escapade, and maybe the fact that we could play all day. But, there were always some students that wrote about other things – peace on earth, thankfulness for a good harvest, or religious views on the holiday.  When these students read their paragraphs out loud to the whole class, you could hear a pin drop. These are the memories that color our holidays. Make memories this holiday season for yourself and those around you. Have a safe and happy holiday.

Frank Leslie's Weekly - The Meaning of Christmas

Frank Leslie’s Weekly – The Meaning of Christmas

The article below from Frank Leslie’s Weekly asks that question that seems to surface this time of the year – “What is the meaning of Christmas?” This question appears several times in Frank Leslie’s and the articles provide a unique perspective on the meanings of Christmas. There are also a wide variety of articles on other aspects of the holiday, such as the Christmas tree, Santa Claus (and Saint Nicholas), toys, and the North Pole.

Students and researchers in American Studies and other academic disciplines will find a treasure trove of primary source information in Frank Leslie’s Weekly on holiday celebrations and their relationship to culture, and identity.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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An International Thanksgiving Day

Not the Fourth of July, but Thanksgiving is our most distinctive national holiday. Other nations have days celebrating their birth or independence; none other has Thanksgiving. Other peoples have had harvest festivals, in joyousness similar to the day we celebrate; but no other people has ever had a distinctive day like Thanksgiving. It is a religious, not a sectarian—a national, not a sectional— festival.

Set apart first by the Pilgrim fathers of New England, it spread to all parts of the land. It exalts gratitude, one of the finest human traits. It calls together the scattered members of the family. Coming at the time it does, it serves as an admirable prelude to the joy of the universal Christmas-tide. Our observance of the day has its own peculiar traditions, but these traditions appeal most strongly to the old stock of New England or to their descendants scattered throughout the West.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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When Elections are in Doubt

The electoral process throughout American history has run its course with only a few major issues in the past 240 years. The 1876 presidential election has been used as the historical yardstick in determining the good and bad of the election process. After a hard fought campaign between Rutherford B. Hayes and Samuel J. Tilden, the final election results brought widespread charges of voter fraud coming from both candidates. Eventually, Congress stepped into the electoral process and selected an electoral commission charged with the task of “selecting” a president. There was great concern that the partisans of the losing candidate might revolt, so Federal troops were activated in Washington, D.C. and in other large metropolitan areas throughout the country. Eventually, a president was selected and the fear of popular agitation subsided and America resumed its political stability.

During the presidential election of 1916, the alarm was raised that there might be the need for voter recounts. But, the specter of the president election of 1876 loomed large in the minds of politicians and candidates.

The article below from Frank Leslie’s Weekly broaches the possibility of a vote recall in the final results of the Presidential Election of 1916. It cites the various issues that had been raised during the 1876 election.

Researchers interested in the history of America’s political process and the role of popular activism will find Frank Leslie’s Weekly a treasure trove off unique information covering many phases of America’s political and popular legacies.

WHEN ELECTIONS ARE IN DOUBT CLOSENESS OF RECENT VOTE RECALLS

TROUBLED DAYS OF 1876 WHEN AN ELECTORAL COMMISSION GAVE THE PRESIDENCY TO HAYES

Frank Leslies Weekly, November 23, 1916

Frank Leslies Weekly, November 23, 1916

As soon as it was claimed that President Wilson had been re-elected by a narrow margin, it was proposed to contest the result in several States that went for him by small pluralities,
notably California, Minnesota, New Mexico and North Dakota. The Democrats also threatened to demand a recount in several States that went Republican. This recalls the election of 1876 when contests were inaugurated in Oregon, Louisiana, Florida and South Carolina. The matter was taken before Congress, as provided by law, and an Electoral Commission of 15 members was appointed. The Commissioners decided every point strictly on party lines, and as the Republicans had a majority of one, the Presidency was given to Rutherford B. Hayes. This award was ratified by the Senate, which was Republican, but not by the House, which was Democratic. As the agreement was that the decision of the Commission should stand unless rejected by both Houses of Congress, Mr. Hayes became President on March 4, 1877, two days after the final decision was rendered. Many people still believe that the Presidency rightly belonged to his rival, Samuel J. Tilden.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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