Tag Archives: Frank Leslie’s Weekly
OG Grand_Canyon

The Geysers-to-Glaciers Trail Opened in 1919

On February 26, 1919, President Woodrow Wilson signed an act of Congress establishing the Grand Canyon National Park. The bill making the Grand Canyon a national park was passed after having been before Congress for thirty-three years. A few months later, in the summer of 1919, the Geysers-to-Glaciers Trail opened. The goal of this highway was to connect America’s Western national parks. Frank Leslie’s Weekly ran this story about the new road and what Americans could expect on July 19, 1919.

The Geysers-to-Glaciers Trail

On June 20 the first link in a great motor highway connecting the national parks of the West was opened for regular automobile transportation. Over this road, which has been designated as “The Geysers-to-Glaciers Motor Trail,” ten-passenger motor busses will be operated on regular daily schedules. A fleet of 275 cars has been placed at the disposal of tourists, to carry them between Yellowstone and Glacier Parks .

The second link in the park highway is now ready for motorists. This is the road connecting the Rocky Mountain Park with the Yellowstone. It is the aim of the United States Government to develop a well-defined motor highway joining also Glacier, Mt. Rainier, Crater Lake, Yosemite, Mesa Verde, Sequoia national parks and the Grand Canyon of Arizona.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Burdell Murder - 3

Murder in NYC: Dr. Harvey Burdell

Harvey Burdell was born in 1811. As a young man he first obtained employment  as a compositor and later took up the study of dentistry in his brother John’s office in New York. After mastering the profession he opened his own office adjacent to his brother’s.

Mysterious Murder – Eminent Citizen Assassinated

Dr. Burdell as he appeared in his casket

Dr. Burdell as he appeared in his casket

The terrible tragedy which involved the death of Dr. Burdell has filled the city with alarm and developed a phase of city life more appalling, perhaps, than any previous chapter which has been unfolded to the terrified gaze of our citizens. Dr. Burdell was a gentleman of quiet manners, paid strict attention to his business, and was altogether before the world one of our most respectable citizens, a wealthy, substantial and successful man. We are informed that he was born in Jefferson county, in the State of New York, and was at the time of his death about forty-six years of age.

He has resided, with the exception of a few years, when he was a student in the Pennsylvania Medical College, almost exclusively in this city since he was twelve years old. By the practice of dentistry and other means he worked his way through college, and graduated in medicine when about twenty-one years of age. As soon as he was through his collegiate course of studies he returned to this city and began to practice dentistry with his brother, John Burdell.

Their office was situated at the corner of Chambers street and Broadway, where Stewart’s store now stands. Harvey Burdell remained there with his brother for a number of years, doing a fair business, when a dispute arose between them about some private affairs, on account of which Harvey Burdell removed to the corner of Duane street and Broadway; he conducted his office there for several months and again moved, locating his office at No. 362 Broadway, corner of Franklin street; there he remained seven years, having extensive practice and doing a lucrative business.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Footballs Call to the Millions

Football’s Call to the Millions [1920]

When more than 3,000,000 persons turn out in a single day to see the game of football played in various places throughout the United States, as they did recently, no argument need be advanced that this sport has attained a popularity which places it in public favor second only to the nation’s pastime, baseball. And if the governing forces of the latter fail to purge it of the crooks who have brought it into disrepute—and I mean the contract-jumpers and contract-breakers, slippery players and tricky managers who succeed in “beating the rules,” as well as the moral defectives who threw games for a price—football will become the premier favorite of America’s sport lovers.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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The New American Monarchy in the Pacific

The New American Monarchy in the Pacific (1875)

(Frank  Leslies Weekly August 21, 1875) – The phrase, American Monarchy, will, no doubt, sound strange to many of our readers. The words, to most minds, imply a contradiction. Our separate nationality grew out of a deadly and destructive war against monarchical power and monarchical principles, and the most notional American never dreamed that the national flag would float over a kingdom created and sustained by American power. We live, however, in extraordinary times; and things the most wonderful and apparently impossible do come to pass.

Far away in the Southern Pacific, and a little to the northeastward of the Tonga groups, lie the Samoan or Navigator’s Islands. The Samoan group, which forms and extended chain running east and west, consists of the four larger islands of Manua, Tutuila, Upolu and Savaii, with several of smaller size. The islands are beautiful and fertile, the largest, Savaii, being about forty miles long by twenty-five broad. As far back as 1839 these islands were visited and surveyed by Lieutenant Wilkes and the other officers of the United States Exploring Expedition. About three years ago a friend of President Grant, by name Steinberger, and a “Colonel,” went to Samoa in a ship-of-war, on what he himself called a “mission.” At the time, very considerable mystery was associated with this mission. It now appears, however, that Colonel Steinberger’s real object was to induce the natives to sign a petition asking the assistance of the United States in their efforts to organize a government of their own, with the special request that he himself be sent out in the capacity of general superintendent. The “mission” was successfully accomplished; and, armed with the petition, Colonel Steinberger reappeared in Washington. Of course he must have reported, although to whom we are left at liberty to form our own opinion. Congress was in session, but Congress was left in as much ignorance of the whole affair as was the general public. As yet, nothing was made of the affair, because nothing was known about it. The people were indifferent, because the people were uninformed.

The second phase of the affair is greatly more interesting than the first. The prayer of the petitioners is granted; and Colonel Steinberger, in a ship-of-war which had been placed at his disposal, well supplied with cannon, small-arms and ammunition, and with numberless articles intended as presents to the native chiefs, is off again for Samoa. It was not possible now for the secret much longer to be preserved. Nor have we any reason to believe that there was any intention longer to maintain the mystery. The work had been done, and mystery was no longer a necessity in the case. Arrived at Samoa, Commander Erben, from the quarter-deck of the United States Steamer Tuscarora, spoke to the assembled people as follows: “I am sent by the Government of the United States to convey, in the vessel-of-war Tuscarora, Colonel A. B. Steinberger, sent by the President of the United States to remain among you.”

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Americas Greatest Soldier

General Pershing: America’s Greatest Soldier (1919)

John J. “Blackjack” Pershing (1860-1948) was promoted to General of the Armies during World War I, the highest rank ever held in the United States Army. With nearly two million men under his command, Pershing was responsible for more troops than any commander in American history. Further, he helped keep American forces independent, despite repeated European requests to put American troops under foreign command. In his later career, he was key in formulating the plan that would become our Interstate Highway System.

This profile ran in Frank Leslie’s Weekly on January 4, 1919.

America’s Greatest Soldier (1919)

By Thomas F. Logan

General Pershing’s happy star has been ascendent throughout the period of his service in France. No stain of criticism or glaring error mars his scutcheon. His record of achievement as Commanding Officer of the American Expeditionary Force in France has been unusual in that from its beginning until today there were no untoward events or reverses to impair the feeling of almost awed confidence with which he is regarded by the American people. Pershing came through clean. He has a tremendously hard record to live up to.

Pershing did not avoid mistakes by avoiding decisions. He struck and struck hard for his own ideas. His aggressive personality and confidence in his own estimate of one phase of the military situation in France turned the tide of battle against Germany. That phase was the morale and fighting ability of the American troops. The French generals , even Marshal Foch, it is said, did not believe the American forces were sufficiently trained to be relied upon in a vital way, even as reserves. They were deferring such reliance upon the Americans shortly before the second battle of the Marne. Pershing believed otherwise. He challenged their doubts. He staked his own military reputation and the reputation of the American armies in the war upon the ability of his troops to deliver. By his own faith and forcefulness he imposed his own estimate upon the Allied supreme command. The result was the appeal to the Americans to save the Allied cause at the second battle of the Marne.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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