Tag Archives: Frank Leslie’s Weekly
Policewomen-Today

Women Guardians of the Peace

From 1913 to 1915, Frank Leslie’s Weekly ran a regularly occurring article titled In the World of Womankind by Frances Frear. These articles featured news about the suffrage movement as well as segments exploring American women’s growing role in the professional world:

This department is devoted to the interests of women. It aims to deal with vital problems in a wholesome and helpful way, and invites the co-operation of its readers. Inquiries will be answered, either through the columns of the paper, or by letter.

This item about women in police forces ran on July 30, 1914.

Women Guardians of the Peace

In the World of Womankind by Frances Frear

In the World of Womankind by Frances Frear

Woman, whose field of work used to be domestic service for the uneducated and the teaching profession for the educated, has won her way into every calling and line of work. One of the newest positions in an ever-widening field of activity is that of an officer of the law.

The policewoman is not to be pictured as an Amazon quelling a disturbance and putting offenders under arrest. A truer picture is that of a quiet little woman in a neat uniform, having the power of arrest, but spending her time in the more important work of prevention.

Policewomen are occupying a growing position of usefulness in the United States and in every important country of Europe, with the exception of England, because it is realized there are certain lines of work that a woman can do better than a man. She can attend to cases of desertion or of separation, investigate newspaper advertisements for women, follow up advertisements luring girls away from home under false promises of employment, and she can score most heavily in the fight against prostitution.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Port of Havana-Cover

Visiting the Port of Havana in 1856

The American going to Cuba for the first time anxiously watches for the first glimpse of the famed “gem of the Antilles.” The announcement of “land in sight,” calls him to the deck; presently there looms up upon the clear atmosphere, a number of snowy white spots, which rapidly gain solidity, and take shape.

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

First are made out the frowning walls of Moro Castle and Light House. To the right is the Punta, in front of which was executed the unfortunate Lopez. Beyond is the fortress of Cabana, one of the strongest in the world. Such are the individual peculiarities of our faithful picture of the entrance of the port of Havana.

Every vessel entering is telegraphed, and such houses as do not command a view of the Moro, reflect the signals by means of looking-glasses affixed to some lofty part of the premises.

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

In the central distance of the view is the fort of Aratas, where the fifty Americans under command of Crittenden, and attached to the Lopez expedition, were barbarously shot by the Havana authorities. To the left is the Prince’s fort, and below is the suburb of Jesse Maria.

Part of the harbor of Havana is shown, and on the right the view of a part of the city. The friends of Crittenden contemplate erecting a magnificent monument to his memory in front of the fort of Aratas, the moment the island is in possession of the United States.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
Source: Frank Leslies Weekly, February 9, 1856


Inaugurations-OG

Memorable Presidential Inaugurations

As the presidential inauguration fast approaches, let’s take a quick look back at some presidential inaugurations that were “memorable.” Frank Leslie’s Weekly provided unique reporting, complete with graphics and later photographs, of several presidential inaugurations during its publishing run.

Comparing early presidential inaugurations with contemporary ones, was a common feature in Leslie’s Weekly.

Check out the article below, entitled “Some of the Most Memorable Presidential Inaugurations,” and then tune into the upcoming inauguration.

Presidential Theodore Roosevelt Delivering His Inaugural Address, March 4, 1905

Presidential Theodore Roosevelt Delivering His Inaugural Address, March 4, 1905

Some of the Most Memorable Presidential Inaugurations

By Charles M. Harvey

When, on April 30th, 1789, George Washington was inaugurated as the first President of the United States, the country had only eleven States (for North Carolina and Rhode Island did not ratify the Constitution or come under the government until many months afterward), all of which were east of the Alleghanies and north of Florida, which was Spanish territory until a third of a century later. New York City, then the national capital, with its 4,000,000 inhabitants in 1905, has 1,000,000 more people and many billions more wealth to-day than the entire United States had at that time. Yet April 30th, 1789, was the proudest day which New York City had seen in the century and two-thirds which had passed since Peter Minuit, representing Maurice of Nassau, the Stadtholder of Holland, bought the island of Manhattan from the Lenni-Lenape Indians for a gift of sixty guilders, or twenty-four dollars, in beads and ribbons, and started the colony of New Amsterdam on its picturesque career.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Frank Leslie - The Meaning of Christmas - Featured

The Meaning of Christmas

The holiday season is upon us! Schools will be closing shortly and students will be looking forward to some time with family and friends.  I can remember when I was a child that our last class assignment before the holidays was to write a paragraph on the meaning of Christmas. Most of the students in class focused on the toys and food, Santa Claus and his chimney escapade, and maybe the fact that we could play all day. But, there were always some students that wrote about other things – peace on earth, thankfulness for a good harvest, or religious views on the holiday.  When these students read their paragraphs out loud to the whole class, you could hear a pin drop. These are the memories that color our holidays. Make memories this holiday season for yourself and those around you. Have a safe and happy holiday.

Frank Leslie's Weekly - The Meaning of Christmas

Frank Leslie’s Weekly – The Meaning of Christmas

The article below from Frank Leslie’s Weekly asks that question that seems to surface this time of the year – “What is the meaning of Christmas?” This question appears several times in Frank Leslie’s and the articles provide a unique perspective on the meanings of Christmas. There are also a wide variety of articles on other aspects of the holiday, such as the Christmas tree, Santa Claus (and Saint Nicholas), toys, and the North Pole.

Students and researchers in American Studies and other academic disciplines will find a treasure trove of primary source information in Frank Leslie’s Weekly on holiday celebrations and their relationship to culture, and identity.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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An International Thanksgiving Day

Not the Fourth of July, but Thanksgiving is our most distinctive national holiday. Other nations have days celebrating their birth or independence; none other has Thanksgiving. Other peoples have had harvest festivals, in joyousness similar to the day we celebrate; but no other people has ever had a distinctive day like Thanksgiving. It is a religious, not a sectarian—a national, not a sectional— festival.

Set apart first by the Pilgrim fathers of New England, it spread to all parts of the land. It exalts gratitude, one of the finest human traits. It calls together the scattered members of the family. Coming at the time it does, it serves as an admirable prelude to the joy of the universal Christmas-tide. Our observance of the day has its own peculiar traditions, but these traditions appeal most strongly to the old stock of New England or to their descendants scattered throughout the West.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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