Tag Archives: Frank Leslie’s Weekly
Behind the Lines

Pictorial: Behind the Lines of our Allies (1917)

This photo feature appeared in the May 24, 1917 edition of Frank Leslie’s Weekly. Frank Leslie’s Weekly, later often known as Leslie’s Weekly, actually began life as Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. Founded in 1855 and continued until 1922, it was an American illustrated literary and news publication, and one of several started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. John Y. Foster was the first editor of the Weekly, which came out on Tuesdays. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.

The ancient and honorable artillery horse

The army horse its patience and reliability all are familiar. This caravan is bringing to the fighting line a supply of ammunition. Across each animal’s back are hung ammunition bags and each horse’s load is 8 shells, besides canteens and other needed things.  Since the Germans in their retreat destroyed all roads, the supplying of the troops falls upon horses and mules until motors and trains can again be used.

The ancient and honorable artillery horse.

Squirrel or Poilu?

Nature provided a snug Retreat for this French soldier. A hole in the base of a hollow tree is a small but Cozy home, warm, dry and safe or as safe as anything can be on the Battlefront. Reading his mail. The Ingenuity of soldiers and making trench life bearable as been entrusted by many photographs of unique devices, invented in necessity, as substitutes for the conveniences of home.

Squirrel or Poilu?

Squirrel or Poilu?

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Plain Truth

Entering World War I: The Plain Truth

America’s entry into World War I came in April 1917, after more than two and a half years of efforts by President Woodrow Wilson to keep the United States out of the war. In 1917, Germany appeared to have the upper hand in Europe when it decided to resume unrestricted submarine warfare against any vessel approaching British waters. This attempt to starve Britain into surrender was balanced against the almost certain knowledge that it would bring the United States into the war.

This all came to a head when it was revealed that Germany made a secret offer to help Mexico regain territories lost in the Mexican–American War in the Zimmermann Telegram. Publication of that message outraged Americans just as German U-boats began sinking American merchant ships in the North Atlantic.

Wilson asked Congress for “a war to end all wars” that would “make the world safe for democracy“, and Congress voted to declare war on Germany on April 6, 1917.

The April 19, 1917 issue of Frank Leslies Weekly had plenty of news and opinion items about our entry into the war. This short piece, The Plain Truth ran on a page full of other small items expressing cautious support for the war.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Chocolate-OG

A Chocolate Opportunity for America

(Frank Leslie’s Weekly – April 12, 1917) Comparatively few of the lovers of the soda-fountain and candy counter are concerned with the source of the chocolate in the confections they order. Chocolate comes from the seeds of the fruit of the cacao tree. The fruit, which is usually gathered from the trees twice yearly, is somewhat like a cucumber in shape and is red or yellow in color, according to the variety of the tree. The seeds, which completely fill the thick husk, as this picture shows, are removed, fermented, screened and dried, and from them are prepared cocoa, cocoa-butter and chocolate.

Americans are the largest users of candy in the world and we have a particular fondness for confections flavored with chocolate or composed chiefly of that article. The soda-fountain is found only in the United States and Canada and of all the syrups used chocolate is the favorite. Despite these facts our chief sources of supply for cacao and chocolate were England and the Netherlands, countries which produce neither sugar nor chocolate.

From these unattractive pods comes the chocolate for dainty bonbons.

From these unattractive pods comes the chocolate for dainty bonbons.

A striking change indeed has taken place in our imports of cacao and chocolate since the war began. In 1913 we purchased about 149,500,000 pounds of chocolate. Of this quantity Europe supplied us about 71,000,000 pounds; Central America and the West Indies 41,500,000 pounds; South America 36,000,000 pounds and Asia about 1,000,000 pounds.

In 1916 a peculiar condition developed in our chocolate market, the imports of which reached the enormous quantity of 243,000,000 pounds. Of this amount Europe contributed but 2,000,000 pounds; Central America and the West Indies, 95,600,000 pounds; South America 97,700,000 pounds and, most significant of all, Africa furnished 28,000,000 pounds, an unusually large proportion coming from the Gold Coast of Africa and isolated English colonies.

Following, there developed in this country a large re-export trade in this commodity. In 1915 our total re-exports of chocolate amounted to 29,000,000 pounds as against only 5,285,000 pounds in 1912.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Policewomen-Today

Women Guardians of the Peace

From 1913 to 1915, Frank Leslie’s Weekly ran a regularly occurring article titled In the World of Womankind by Frances Frear. These articles featured news about the suffrage movement as well as segments exploring American women’s growing role in the professional world:

This department is devoted to the interests of women. It aims to deal with vital problems in a wholesome and helpful way, and invites the co-operation of its readers. Inquiries will be answered, either through the columns of the paper, or by letter.

This item about women in police forces ran on July 30, 1914.

Women Guardians of the Peace

In the World of Womankind by Frances Frear

In the World of Womankind by Frances Frear

Woman, whose field of work used to be domestic service for the uneducated and the teaching profession for the educated, has won her way into every calling and line of work. One of the newest positions in an ever-widening field of activity is that of an officer of the law.

The policewoman is not to be pictured as an Amazon quelling a disturbance and putting offenders under arrest. A truer picture is that of a quiet little woman in a neat uniform, having the power of arrest, but spending her time in the more important work of prevention.

Policewomen are occupying a growing position of usefulness in the United States and in every important country of Europe, with the exception of England, because it is realized there are certain lines of work that a woman can do better than a man. She can attend to cases of desertion or of separation, investigate newspaper advertisements for women, follow up advertisements luring girls away from home under false promises of employment, and she can score most heavily in the fight against prostitution.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Port of Havana-Cover

Visiting the Port of Havana in 1856

The American going to Cuba for the first time anxiously watches for the first glimpse of the famed “gem of the Antilles.” The announcement of “land in sight,” calls him to the deck; presently there looms up upon the clear atmosphere, a number of snowy white spots, which rapidly gain solidity, and take shape.

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

Entrance to the Port of Havana, from Fuerte Del Principe

First are made out the frowning walls of Moro Castle and Light House. To the right is the Punta, in front of which was executed the unfortunate Lopez. Beyond is the fortress of Cabana, one of the strongest in the world. Such are the individual peculiarities of our faithful picture of the entrance of the port of Havana.

Every vessel entering is telegraphed, and such houses as do not command a view of the Moro, reflect the signals by means of looking-glasses affixed to some lofty part of the premises.

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

Fort of Aratas, where Crittenden and his fifty americans were executed

In the central distance of the view is the fort of Aratas, where the fifty Americans under command of Crittenden, and attached to the Lopez expedition, were barbarously shot by the Havana authorities. To the left is the Prince’s fort, and below is the suburb of Jesse Maria.

Part of the harbor of Havana is shown, and on the right the view of a part of the city. The friends of Crittenden contemplate erecting a magnificent monument to his memory in front of the fort of Aratas, the moment the island is in possession of the United States.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
Source: Frank Leslies Weekly, February 9, 1856