Tag Archives: Freedoms Journal
wedding-veil

Wives in Demand in 1828

Wives seem to be in demand all over the world. The following is from an English paper:

Wants a Wife, – She must bee middel eaged and good tempered widdow, or a Maid, and pursest of propertey, and I wood, far reather have a Wife that is ever so plain than a fine Lady that think herself hansom, the Advertiser is not rich nor young, old nor poor, and in a very few years will have a good incoumb. – Can be hiley reckamended for onesty, sobrieaty, and good tempered and has no in combranc, is very actif, but not a treadesman, have been as Butler and Bailiff for meney years in most respectable famlies, and shood I not be so luckey as to get me a wife, wood de most willing to take a sitteyeashun once moor, wood prefer living in the countrey, understands Brewing most famousley, is well adapted for a inn or publick house.

Please to derect W.W. 68, Berwick street, Oxford roade, or aney Ladey must call and have a interview with the widdow that keeps the hous, and say where and when we can meet each other.

All letters must be pd, no Office keeper to apply. My fameley ar verey well off and welthey, far above middling order.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source: Freedom’s Journal, December 26, 1828


John Brown Russwurm

Freedom’s Journal News Summary for February 8, 1828

Although Freedom’s Journal lived a relatively short life, it is important in that it was the first American newspaper written by blacks for blacks. From the beginning the editors felt, “… that a paper devoted to the dissemination of useful knowledge among our brethren, and to their moral and religious improvement, must meet with the cordial approbation of every friend to humanity…”.

This news summary was published in the February 8, 1828 edition.

SCHOOLS — The bill making an annual State appropriation of 10,000 dollars for the Free Schools, and providing a fund for accumulation, to be devoted to the same object, has been passed by the House of Representatives of the Legislature of Rhode Island with only two dissecting votes.

DROWNED — Mr. Benjamin Ellis and his son Sewall were drowned at Plymouth, Mass. lately, by falling through the ice. The bodies were recovered a few hours after the accident occurred. Mr. Ellis has left a wife and a large number of children.

DEAF AND DUMB — An institution for the instruction of the Deaf and Dumb, has been commenced in N. Carolina; and an application has been made to congress for a grant of land.

AFRICAN SCHOOL — During the last summer an African School was kept in Portsmouth N.H. the expense of which was principally defrayed for the first time by the town. Nearly all the coloured children amounting to about 30, attended the school.

EDUCATION — Four scholarships of 1000 dollars each, are founded at Danville College. A farm is attached, to reduce by labour the expense of living. The indigent will be supported and educated without charge. Those who are able, will never pay above 20 dollars per annum.

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Am I not a man and a brother?

The Case of Somersett from Freedom’s Journal

Somerset (Somersett), a black slave, had been brought to England, in November, 1769, by his master, Mr. Charles Stewart, and in process of time left him. Stewart found an opportunity of seizing him unawares; and he was conveyed on board the Ann and Mary, Captain Knowles, in order to be carried to Jamaica, and there to be sold for a slave.

Mr. Serjeant Davy brought the case into court before Lord Mansfield on the 24th of January, but professed the cause to be of so high importance, that he requested it might be deferred till another term in order to give him time to prepare fully for its support.

This request Lord Mansfield declined granting, but fixed the hearing for that day fortnight, apprising Serjeant Davy at the same time, that “if it should come fairly to the general question, whatever the opinion of the court might be, even if they were all agreed on one side or the other, the subject was of so general and extensive concern, that, from the nature of the question, he should certainly take the opinion of all the judges upon it.

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FREEDOMSJOURNAL-1827-10-05

New Slave Laws in Freedom’s Journal in 1827

Freedom’s Journal was the first African-American owned and operated newspaper published in the United States. Founded by Peter Williams, Jr. and other free black men, it was published weekly in New York City from 16 March 1827 to 28 March 1829. The journal was edited by John Russwurm and co-editor Samuel Cornish.

Freedom’s Journal provided international, national, and regional information on current events. Its editorials opposed slavery and other injustices, and also discussed current issues, such as the proposal by the American Colonization Society to resettle free blacks in Liberia, a colony established for that purpose in West Africa.

The Journal published biographies of prominent blacks, and listings of the births, deaths, and marriages in the African-American community in New York. It circulated in 11 states, the District of Columbia, Haiti, Europe, and Canada.

Happiness Of Being Flogged

The following is extracted from the Trinidad Gazette:

“We did and do declare the whip to be essential to the West Indian discipline. The COMFORT, WELFARE, and HAPPINESS of our labouring classes cannot subsist without it.”
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George III in Coronation Garb

Pulpit Flattery and King George III

Although Freedom’s Journal lived a relatively short life, it is important in that it was the first American newspaper written by blacks for blacks. From the beginning the editors felt, “… that a paper devoted to the dissemination of useful knowledge among our brethren, and to their moral and religious improvement, must meet with the cordial approbation of every friend to humanity…“.

Pulpit Flattery

One of the first acts performed by George III. after his accession to the throne, was to issue an order, prohibiting any of the clergy who should be called to preach before him from paying him any compliment in their discourses.

His Majesty was led to this from the fulsome adulation which Dr. Thomas Wilson, prebendary of Westminster, thought proper to deliver in the chapel royal; and for which, instead of thanks, he received from his royal auditor a pointed reprimand, his Majesty observing, “that he came to chapel to hear the praises of God, and not his own.”

The circumstance operated wonderfully on the reverent orator, as from that moment he became a flaming patriot.

Source

Collection: African American Newspapers
Publication: Freedom’s Journal
Date: May 30, 1828
Title: Pulpit Flattery
Location: New York, New York