Tag Archives: Godey’s Lady’s Book
The-Baby-OG

House and Home: The Baby (1887)

This article on babies by Dr. May-Dew appeared in the House and Home pages of the August 1887 issue of Godey’s Lady’s Book.

In the magazine’s prospectus: The House and Home Department deserves careful perusal by mothers and housekeepers; the suggestive series of articles by Dr. May-Dew, and the clever, bright papers of Mrs. E.M. Babcock, whose “Over the Fence, or What One Woman Says to Another,” is one of the most original features ever introduced into this or any other periodical.

The Baby

There is a world-wide difference between the birth of a baby in what we call uncivilized lands, and among primitive people, and our own. It has been a matter of wonder with us how women, destitute of modern comforts and resources, endured the strain and pain of child-birth; how they and the children that were born survived the hardships which they must have endured. But acquaintance with the semi-savage races of our own day shows that the risk, and the pain, the long trial, and the conditions which bring such dread and suffering to modern civilized women were, and are, unknown to barbaric tribes and times. Travelers have told us that the birth of a child hardly interrupts the daily routine of the wives of the lower class of Chinese; and we are told by a writer in the present number of this Magazine, how the native women in the Sandwich Islands bear their children with hardly an hours’ departure from their every day routine, and without the intervention of either doctor or nurse. But they do not possess this hardihood when they become even partly infected with European notions and habits; for either from the effects of a change of diet, less activity, a more burdensome dress, or all combined, an attempt to follow the old ways often results in prostration and even death.

The modern civilized woman runs to the opposite extreme from her savage sister. She is afraid of everything, even cleanliness. “I should not have allowed you to take a bath so soon,” said a physician to a patient eight hours after the birth of a baby , upon finding her fresh from a nap and a warm bath. “I knew you would not, doctor; that is the reason I did not ask you, replied the lady. I had strength for the bath, but not for the battle for it; and my experience has taught me that it is the best, and only thing to quiet the nerves of the body, and put the body itself in a condition to begin the process of restoration.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

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How to Cook Potatoes

How to Cook Potatoes in Godey’s Lady’s Book

Godey’s Lady’s Book magazine was intended to entertain, inform and educate the women of America. In addition to extensive fashion descriptions and plates, the early issues included biographical sketches, articles about mineralogy, handcrafts, female costume, the dance, equestrienne procedures, health and hygiene, recipes and remedies and the like.

Our collection provides the complete run of Godey’s Lady’s Book, and is the only one containing the color plates as they originally appeared.

These potato recipes appeared in the February 1867 issue of Godey’s Lady’s Book.

BOILED POTATOES — There are really so many ways of even boiling potatoes that it is difficult to satisfy one’s mind which is the best, each being good, providing it is well done. The French, however, hold that by using too much water the flavor of the potatoes becomes seriously impaired; but it depends entirely upon the quality of the potatoes whether they are better done in their jackets or peeled: though towards the end of spring, when they get old, it is greatly preferable to pare them, as the skins then contain a narcotic property which gives the potatoes a strongly disagreeable flavor. In any case, potatoes should be boiled quickly, care being taken to choose them of an equal size, and cutting them in half when they are large. Rather small-sized potatoes are to be chosen in preference to those of overgrown proportions, and it is at all times in better taste to have potatoes rather underdone than boiled to pieces.

The following is the most generally received method of boiling potatoes. Thoroughly wash and pare them, place them in a small saucepan with sufficient cold water to cover them, place them upon a clear fire, and bring them to a boil as speedily as possible. Good potatoes of a proper size will be done in about fifteen or twenty minutes after beginning to boil. Strain off the water and serve as soon as possible, without sprinkling salt over them, or adding any to the water in which they were cooked. One thing against the addition of salt is that careless cooks generally use it with such a heavy hand. Some housekeepers advocate placing the saucepan of potatoes over the fire again after the water has been poured away, but if the potatoes are done as they should be, this process, instead of being an improvement, only tends to give the potatoes a bad flavor. When intended to be mashed or converted into a made-dish, potatoes should invariably be boiled without salt being employed, as it deadens them both in flavor and quality; but for made-dishes generally potatoes are preferable steamed instead of boiled.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

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Christmas 2012. Pudding supplied by photographer's grandmother.

Christmas Puddings from Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1870

Few cooks are agreed about this good old English dish, each one considering her way the best. We have carefully selected several recipes relating to these old-time puddings, from which our readers can make a selection. We know that they will have good reason to be satisfied with any of them.

Plum Pudding — Beat up four eggs well; add to them, firs, half a pint of new milk and a teaspoonful of salt. Then mix in half a pound of beef suet, chopped very fine, a pound of raisins stoned and chopped, a quarter of a pound of brown sugar, one nutmeg grated, one ounce of candied peel cut into thin small strips; stir all well together, and add another half pint of new milk; then beat in sufficient flour to make it a stiff paste, add a glass of brandy and a glass of white wine. Tie it up close, and boil it, if in a mold or basin, five hours; if in a cloth, four; but the pudding is better, as well as shapelier, when boiled in a shape or mold. For Sauce, make some good melted butter, put in some loaf-sugar, a glass of white wine, and a glass of brandy; make it boil up, pour half of it over the pudding, and serve the rest in a lot sauce-boat. This pudding may be made with the grated crumb of household bread as well as with four; it is better so if to be eaten cold. Plum puddings may be made a fortnight or longer before they are wanted, and will be all the mellower for the keeping, if hung up in a dry place where they will not mold. Christmas plum pudding is often served with a sprig of holly stuck in the middle; this makes a pretty garnish.

A Good Christmas Plum Pudding — The pride of English cookery is the plum pudding, which continental nations despise, because they can never succeed in making it eatable; we may therefore be excused in giving several receipts, all tried and approved, though of various degrees of excellence. With one pound of clean dry currants and half a pound of good raisins stoned mix one pound of bread-crumbs, half a pound of fine flour, and one pound and a half of finely-shred suet; add a quarter of a pound of sifted sugar, a grated nutmeg, a drachm of cinnamon, two cloves, and half a dozen almonds pounded, and an ounce each of candied orange and lemon sliced thin; mix all the materials thoroughly together in a bowl with a glass of brandy and one of sherry; then beat very well six eggs, and slowly stir in till all be well blended; cover the bowl, and let the mixture stand for twelve hours; then pour it in a pudding cloth, and tie it, not very tight; put it into boiling water, and keep up the boiling for six hours. Serve with sugar sifted over, and wine or punch sauce. Brandy is usually sent in with a Christmas pudding to be poured over the whole pudding, or over each slice, then lighted, and served in flames.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

(more…)


working

Giving Only Eye-Service

There is nothing more humiliating to a right-minded person than to be watched. There is nothing more annoying to an employer than the spectacle of men hard at work in his presence, but idle, or dilatory as soon as his back is turned.

A man who is desirous of earning his wages works at all times during business hours, but one whose chief anxiety is to draw his salary, is better out of the way than in it, and is, moreover, dishonest. Whether the engagement be for one year or one week, the agreement, on the one hand, is to pay a certain sum for the services of an individual; on the other, to work faithfully and honorably for the said term.

What would be thought of the employer who should, on pay-day, withhold a portion of the salary by reason of the contract not being kept by the workman? He would be universally condemned as mean beyond precedent; but is there any more justice or honor in frittering away an employer’s time, or deceiving him by a pretended performance of work, than withholding an employee’s salary?  None at all.

Labor is honorable, and the man who works for his living, whether with a pen or a hammer and chisel, is to be respected, but no one respects a man who is constantly trying to evade his duty.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

Source: Godeys Ladys Book, November 1866
Top Image: Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, v. 22, no. 552 (1866 Apr. 28), p. 89.


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Godey’s Presidential Profiles: John Quincy Adams

Louis A. Godey established Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830 in Philadelphia. Initially, it included mainly articles clipped from British women’s magazines and hand-coloured plates reproducing fashions of the day. Wanting to provide more original content by American authors, Godey bought the Boston Ladies’ Magazine in January 1837 and invited its editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, to edit the revamped publication.

For the next 40 years, Hale and Godey commissioned fiction, poetry, and essays almost exclusively from American writers. Among the distinguished authors on the magazine’s literary pages were Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Harriet Beecher Stowe.

In the 1880s, Godey’s Lady’s Book featured monthly series of profiles on American presidents. This was the magazine’s item on John Quincy Adams.

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS,
THE SIXTH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

John Quincy Adams, the son of Washington’s successor, and heir to an illustrious name, was born in Massachusetts, July 11, 1767, but in his early youth, having accompanied his father on an embassy to Europe, he had all the advantages of foreign travel and a protracted residence at Paris.

He developed a fine literary taste as he grew older, and became a professor of rhetoric in Harvard University, having first engaged in politics to a mild extent. His political career was interrupted by the election of Thomas Jefferson, but he soon abandoned his academical post to pursue it again, and was elected to the Senate by Massachusetts as a strong representative of the Federal party. Later on his views were modified, and he partially fraternized with Madison’s party. During the latter’s administration he was sent on a mission to Russia, and afterward to England, where he took part in the negotiations of peace then pending, and became the adviser of the deputies sent from America to Ghent.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

(more…)