Tag Archives: Godey’s Lady’s Book
Valentines

A Year in the Home: February

Godey’s Lady’s Book played an important role in shaping the cultural customs in 19th century America. The “Queen of Monthlies” is best known for the hand-tinted fashion plate that appeared at the start of each issue, which provide a record of the progression of women’s dress.

Beyond clothing fashions, the articles and editorials in Godey’s included descriptions of current trends and acted as an arbiter of manners and helped shape many of the traditions practiced by American families today.

This was part of an 1890 series of articles covering a year of American domestic traditions and lore.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

A Year in the Home: February

By Augusta Salisbury Prescott

What are you going to do this year to keep alive the memory of Saint Valentine? Do you know who he was and why he is peculiarly entitled to be held in loving family remembrance?

He was a bishop who dwelt in Rome, and who made it his special care to look after the happiness of married couples, and to assist the young in their matchmaking. So it would be more than a pity if we were to allow the good old custom of celebrating his birthday to fall into desuetude. And then, too, the early months of the year are so long, and ofttimes tedious, that one may be glad to enliven them by taking advantage of every festival possible.

The old idea of sending a valentine in the form of a painted square of paper, containing a sentimental verse and, mayhap, a little looking-glass, has entirely gone out. But in place of this style have come others that make of valentine offerings. things of beauty and a joy as long as they last. They are souvenirs similar to those of Christmas, birthday and Easter, save that they differ in the sentiment, having on them a light line or two, or even no inscription at all save the date.

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Godeys1

Purity, a Sarah Josepha Hale Acrostic

In 1837 Sarah Josepha Hale began working as editor of the expanded Godey’s Lady’s Book based in Philadelphia, but insisted she edit from Boston while her youngest son, William, attended Harvard College.

She remained editor at Godey’s for forty years, retiring in 1877 when she was almost 90. During this time, she became one of the most important and influential arbiters of American taste. In its day, Godey’s, with no significant competitors, had an influence unimaginable for any single publication in the 21st century. The magazine is credited with an ability to influence fashions not only for women’s clothes, but also in domestic architecture. Godey’s published house plans that were copied by home builders nationwide.

PURITY. AN ACROSTIC.

Sing, my muse, in worthy lays;
A noble theme demands thy praise,
Radiant with love’s brilliant rays
As zephyrs mid spring’s foliage play,
Hallowing the influence of mild May,
Joy and peace around diffusing,
O‘er each spirit lonely musing,
So is thy charming minstrelsy
E‘en as the gentle zephyr free;
Pure as the light of stars of heaven,
Hallowed by power to Truth given,
And calm as is the breath of even:
Hope beckons to a brighter clime,
And Fancy wings her flight sublime
Long may thy gifted muse rehearse
Each grateful theme in glowing verse.

By Robert G. Allison.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

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New YEars

A Year in the Home: January

Godey’s Lady’s Book played an important role in shaping the cultural customs in 19th century America. The “Queen of Monthlies” is best known for the hand-tinted fashion plate that appeared at the start of each issue, which provide a record of the progression of women’s dress.

Beyond clothing fashions, the articles and editorials in Godey’s included descriptions of current trends and acted as an arbiter of manners and helped shape many of the traditions practiced by American families today.

This was part of an 1890 series of articles covering a year of American domestic traditions and lore.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

A Year in the Home: January

By Augusta Salisbury Prescott

It is more than a pity that the good old Dutch custom of making and receiving calls upon the first day in the year has been dying out among us.

Every year, with the possible exception of last, has seen fewer and fewer homes thrown open as of yore with a hospitable welcome to all friends and friends’ friends who might be inclined to call and avail themselves of that hospitality. But last New Year a decided backward jump was made to the days when “come one, come all” was the watchword; and, judging from indications, many more will follow the lead and be “at home” this year. Even in the summer when the over burdening and overpowering temperature made all ideas and plans for winter as vague and remote as possible, one frequently heard on hotel piazza and seaside promenade, scraps of conversation to indicate that a good old-fashioned winter was looked forward to by all.

Indeed, the feminine world seems to have awakened to the fact that directoire gowns and old-time flowing sleeves, reticules and bead-bedecked coiffures are to be worn, that such costumes will appear to better advantage if the wearer is entertaining and entertained after the old-time manner; dancing stately minuets and cotillions, rather than the latter day waltz, giving noon-day feasts and calling them “luncheons ” instead of “breakfasts,” and setting the evening reception hours much earlier than has been the style for the last decade. So, with all these contemplated changes, it is proposed to begin the year by extending to all male friends the old-time right hand of welcome on New Year day.

Of course no young woman will essay to “receive” without a chaperone, who may be her mother or some married friend. But this will not be a deterrent to any, for chaperones can always be found whose delight it is to gather about them a bevy of bright girls to assist in social duties.

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Fashion-Plate-December-1838

What’s Inside? Godey’s Lady’s Book – December 1838

This magazine was published by Louis A. Godey from Philadelphia for 48 years (1830–1878). Each issue contained poetry, articles, and engravings created by prominent writers and other artists of the time. Sarah Josepha Hale (author of “Mary Had a Little Lamb”) was its editor from 1837 until 1877 and only published original, American manuscripts.

Contents for December 1838

  • Kitty’s Relations- A Sketch by Miss Leslie (Short Story)
  • Leonidas (Poem)
  • The Man In The Wheel By L.A. Wilmer. (Short Story)
  • Riddle (Poem)
  • To The Evening Star (Poem)
  • Hints On Marriage (Advice)
  • Aside: Men are borne with two eyes, but with one tongue, in order that they should see twice as much as they say; but, from their conduct, one would suppose that they were born with two tongues, and one eye; for those talk the most who have observed the least, and obtrude their remarks upon everything, who have seen into nothing.
  • To A Youth With A Purse (Poem)
  • The Young Countess; Or, A Folly And Its Consequences By Miss M. Miles (Short Story)
  • Sonnet To Memory (Poem)
  • Esther – A Dramatic Sketch (Play)
  • A Sketch From Life By Mrs. Hofland (Poem)
  • The Glass Family: A Traditionary Story In Five Chapters (Short Story)
  • Untitled Poem – Written beneath the “Old Oak Tree,” whilst looking upon the “Merrimac” for the first time after an absence of years BY J. ELLIOTT KNIGHT
  • Aside: In all societies it is advisable to associate if possible with the highest; not that the highest are always the best, but, because if disgusted there, we can at any time descend; but if we begin with the lowest, to ascend is impossible. In the grand theatre of human life, a box ticket takes us through the house.
  • Fireside Education (Book Review)
  • Hope (Poem)
  • Kathleen Mavourneen, An Irish Ballad, Sung With Rapturous Applause, By Dempster And Mr. Horn And  Composed By F.N. Crouch. (Sheet Music)
  • Arabella; A Poem  By L.A. Wilmer (Poem)
  • Aside: We cannot wonder That kings so readily cause men to be killed, when it appears, on authority, that Charles the Tenth, in a single year gratified his royal taste by 89 stag-hunts, and by shooting 3525 pheasants, 1375 partridges, 555 hares, and 1532 rabbits. In all, this royal exemplar destroyed, in one year, 7404 animals, most of them more worthy to live than himself; while his precious son, the Dauphin, claimed his 7025, including more pheasants and hares than his father. In one year, 1828-9, there were killed, in France, 834 wolves and cubs.
  • Aside: We most readily forgive that attack which affords us an opportunity of reaping a splendid triumph. A wise man will not sally forth from his doors to cudgel a fool, who is in the act of breaking his windows by pelting them with guineas.
  • Editors Table (Editorial and discussion of upcoming features)
  • Fashion Plate and Description
Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

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A Year in the Home: December

Godey’s Lady’s Book played an important role in shaping the cultural customs in 19th century America. The “Queen of Monthlies” is best known for the hand-tinted fashion plate that appeared at the start of each issue, which provide a record of the progression of women’s dress.

Beyond clothing fashions, the articles and editorials in Godey’s included descriptions of current trends and acted as an arbiter of manners and helped shape many of the traditions practiced by American families today.

This was part of an 1890 series of articles covering a year of American domestic traditions and lore.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

A Year in the Home: December

By Augusta Salisbury Prescott

At no time in all the year is the heart so filled with joy, or the home so replete with genuine home love and home feeling as during the time that leads us up to the holiday season.

Christmas Day is, to be sure, our day of days—the most joyful of all the joyous season; but surely every home-mother, at least, will agree that the days of preparation before Christmas are filled with a quiet, steady, soul stirring happiness that could not be exchanged for any single day of revelry. For is it not during the weeks that precede the holidays that we prepare gifts for our dear ones? Are we not busy planning and scheming, and, perhaps, denying ourselves some coveted thing that we may enrich those we love?

Yes! we are doing all these dear things for a month before Christmas, and we well know how happy this preparation has made us. Truly it is more blessed to give than to receive.

It seems a pity, and more than a pity, that anything conventional should enter into our Christmas giving, yet so it must be. A change has come over the world since these days, so long ago, when the wise men came bringing gifts to the Christ-child. A sense of propriety has crept into our Christmas giving that culture renders inseparable from this most beautiful custom.

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