Tag Archives: National Anti-Slavery Standard

Imprisonment of Free State Abolitionists

From the Pennasylvania Freeman:

Many of the readers of the Freeman are familiar with the case of Dr. Brooke, and others, of Ohio.

By the constitution and laws of that State, all slaves entering her territory with the consent of their owners, are declared free. A party of slaveholders emigrating from Virginia to Missouri with their human chattels, encamped for the night in Clinton county, in which reside a large number of active abolitionists.

Several of these called at the encampment, and informed the slaves that by the laws of the State they were in, they were entitled to their freedom; whereupon they all decamped. For this act, twenty-one persons were indicted for abduction and riot.



Rumors Among Slaves in Alabama – 1840

Perry County, Alabama
December 24, 1840

There has been considerable excitement in this State, in reference to disturbances among the black population. The impression is general among them that they are to be free, either after Christmas, or the 4th of March, at farthest.  Great numbers have been examined, but it is evident there is no organization among them—no concerted plans. Some say one thing, some another. One fellow testifies that Van Buren is in the region of Mongomery with 200,000 men to effect their deliverance. Another says, Queen Victoria is coming to Alabama with a British army to deliver them! So you see it is all “moonshine.”



The 2nd Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society

In 1840 the seven year old Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society experienced some internal and external dissent and was dissolved and reformed under the same name. Researchers studying this group should know that the society was sometimes also referred to as the “Female Abolition Society,” “Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society,” or the “Boston Female A.S. Society.”

Details on the situation, as well as some letters from the people involved, can be found in the October 28, 1840 issue of the National Anti-Slavery Standard.

The new organization published these resolutions at their October 14, 1840 meeting: (more…)


Preventing Slave Escapes by Ship in South Carolina

This article on a new law in South Caroline appeared in National Anti-Slavery Standard on April 28, 1842.  National Anti-Slavery Standard was the official weekly newspaper of the American Anti-Slavery Society, an abolitionist society founded in 1833 by William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan to spread their movement across the nation with printed materials.

New Law in South Carolina

At the last session of the legislature an act was passed, “to prevent the citizens of New-York from carrying slaves, or persons held to service, out of the State, and to prevent the escape of persons charged with the commission of any crime.

This law is to take effect on the 1st of May next; unless New York repeals her law of 1840, granting the right of trial by jury to fugitive slaves. This act declares that no vessel of any size or description, owned in whole or in part, commanded or navigated, by any other person than an actual inhabitant of South Carolina, and destined to any port in the State of New York, shall be allowed to depart, until inspected by the proper officer. If any vessel depart without a certificate that no slave-criminal is on board, the captain or owner shall pay five-hundred dollars to whoever will sue for the same. The inspector is to receive ten dollars for his certificate, for the payment of which the vessel is liable.


Practical illustration of the Fugitive Slave Law

Aryannah Pendleton: A Fugitive Slave Case

This article about Miss Pendleton’s case was published in the National Anti-Slavery Standard on October 15, 1840.

A trial which excited much interest, was held in this town on Thursday last, before Hon. Joseph Eaton, Judge of the County Court, for the purpose of recovering a colored girl, by the name of Aryannah Pendleton, claimed to be a fugitive slave belonging to a Mrs. Price, of Richmond, Virginia.

The girl, it seems, came to New-York with Mrs. Price, and although strictly guarded, found means, prompted by the love of Liberty, of escaping to Hartford, and from there to Hampton, where she has resided for about three years past, and until arrested at the instigation of Doctor Price, son of the above named Mrs. Price, on a writ of Habeas Corpus and brought before Judge Eaton for trial.

The residence of this girl, it appears from what information we can collect, was made known to Doctor Price, by a contemptible fellow named Fuller, formerly a resident of Hampton, but now of the South, to whom, it is said, Doctor Price is indebted, and that the girl was, if found a slave, to be sold to satisfy such demand.