Tag Archives: National Citizen and Ballot Box
George Eliot's Death Coverage2

George Eliot Dead – December 22, 1880

Mary Anne Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880; alternatively “Mary Ann” or “Marian”), known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She is the author of seven novels, including Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871–72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of which are set in provincial England and known for their realism and psychological insight.

She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure that her works would be taken seriously. Female authors were published under their own names during Eliot’s lifetime, but she wanted to escape the stereotype of women’s writing being limited to lighthearted romances. She also wanted to have her fiction judged separately from her already extensive and widely known work as an editor and critic.

Her death was shared in the January 1881 issue of the National Citizen and Ballot Box, a leading Suffrage newspaper in the United States:

George Eliot Dead

The unlooked for tidings that this grand woman, the greatest novelist of the century, has suddenly finished her career on earth, will bring deep sorrow, to a large circle of her readers, and untold bereavement to many a heart.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Average Woman

The Average American Woman (1878)

“Now is the time when the average American woman begins to negotiate for a handsome Christmas present for her husband —at some store where his credit is good.”— The Boone County (Iowa) Republican.

Exactly! It is the “average American woman” who tends the babies, washes, cooks, scrubs, washes dishes, irons, bakes and sews, and sits down in the evening tired and discouraged, to take up the weekly paper and read such cruel and insulting taunts and jeers, because in spite of her care and toil, she is unselfish enough to wish to give her husband a Christmas present.

It is the ‘average American woman” who takes ten cents worth of flour and converts it into thirty-five cents worth of bread.

Who earns the bread for the family, the husband who gives ten cents worth of labor, or the wife who gives twenty-five?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Crummell Sermon

Reviewed: Rev. Crummell’s Sermon Against Woman’s Equality

Rev. Alexander Crummell, a colored clergyman of Washington, pastor of St. Luke’s (Episcopal) Church, and said to be a highly educated man, has within a few months preached a sermon upon the biblical position of woman, in which he holds her as having been created inferior to man, secondary to him, with no right, natural or acquired, by creation or revelation, to govern herself or hold opinions of her own. This sermon, “Marriage and Divorce,” is said to have been printed by request, but whether this request comes from husbands or wives is not stated.

Taking for his ground that passage of scripture which declares that “a man shall leave father and mother and cleave unto his wife,” he soon renders the contradictory opinion that adultery on the part of the wife is a ground for divorce by the husband, but that no reciprocal right exists upon her part.

In the space at command it is impossible to fully review this sermon, which is of the same general type of the Knox-Little sermon delivered last winter in St. Clement’s Church, Philadelphia, and which was reviewed by the editor of the National Citizen. Although Rev. Crummell admits of allowable ground of separation on the part of the wife, for “cruelty, brutal assaults by the husband, absolute neglect or refusal to support her or her family, incompatibility of temper, beastly lust and adultery,” he presses upon her attention the fact that she is still his wife, and is bound by the law of wedlock during the whole period of her husband’s life, and has no right to break this bondage by divorce.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Hayes-Lost

President Hayes: A Lost Opportunity

President Hayes has lost another opportunity of reminding the country of its injustice toward woman. Again a message has gone before Congress, and no mention made of the women citizens of the country.

The Chinese have a saying, that “even the gods cannot help those who lose an opportunity.”

Two years ago, a committee from the National Woman Suffrage convention was appointed to call upon President Hayes, and remind him that no women had been appointed as commissioners from this country to the Paris Exposition, while many of the departments the commissioners were to investigate could much more satisfactorily be reported upon by women—as laces, embroideries, &c. The president received this committee, of which the editor of the NATIONAL CITIZEN was one with due courtesy, even reading from among his private papers those duties of commissioners which he recognized as more likely to be satisfactorily performed by women. “But, ladies, you are too late,” said he. “You should have petitioned Congress a year ago; these appointments have been settled a long time.”

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Writing Desk

The Apple-Headed Young Man

Mrs. Stanton tells a capital story of a spruce, conceited-looking young man, with head the size of an apple, who approached her in the cars the morning after she had given one of her strong lectures. “I do not agree with your views, Madam,” said this small-headed youth, evidently thinking that his opposition would stop the wheels of progress, and change the whole current of reform.

We everywhere meet apple-headed young men—persons attempting to block advancement, whether material or spiritual. “I do not agree with you” murdered Lovejoy at Alton, imprisoned Garrison in Baltimore, burned Hess and Servetius at the stake, persecuted Luther, crucified our Lord. But, despite it all, reform goes on.

When Stephenson invented the locomotive it was bitterly opposed; scientific men declared it impracticable; men of wealth opposed it on the ground of its frightening the deer and other game; landlords objected on the ground of its taking away their custom. Amid the multitude of opponents; one man gravely saul, “And what, Mr. Stephenson, would be the consequences if your engine met a cow?” “It would be varry bod for the coo,” responded Mr. Stephenson in his broad Scotch dialect. And so it ever is.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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