Tag Archives: South Carolina
Charleston_sc_1865

Charleston under Fire

As many Southern port cities had been closed off by the Union blockade, Charleston became an important center for blockade running. Repeated attempts by the Union Navy to take Charleston proved fruitless. The city resisted military occupation for the majority of the war’s four years.

With the development of newer, longer-range artillery, and as Union forces were able to place batteries even closer to the city. The bombardment that began in late 1863 continued on and off for 587 days.

This bombardment would destroy much of the city. The defenders were finally beaten back and the Union was able to capture the city, only a month and a half before the war ended.

Charleston under Fire

From the Columbia Carolinian:

We take the liberty of presenting to our readers the following extract of a private letter just received. Its genial description of the present aspect of the city and bay of Charleston will repay perusal. The brief sentences which allude to General Ripley assert nothing more of that bold, ardent and able soldier than we know he deserves. We hope, with all heart, that the hour of his long merited promotion has arrived at last:

Can you come and see us? The city is very safe and interesting now. A visit to the ‘district excites the most varied and strangest emotions. The dreariness of winter has passed away, and the vivifying touch of spring has brought out the green glories of our trees and crowded our gardens with flowers of all hues. They were never more beautiful. The silent air is rich with perfume. But the solitude seems in strange contrast with this lavish infusion of beauty. The rose especially seems to solicit the presence of the man, and crave a witness for its charms. Other flowers may properly grace the solitudes of the wilderness and decorate the pathless prairie, but the rose, the ‘rose, asks for human companionship, and when blooming unseen, suggests the idea of utter desolation and abandonment. Our gardens are sad in their solitude, and in the absence of those more graceful and beautiful flowers, their proper companions, which gave them life and cheerfulness, and all their value, their bloom and perfume is wasted. What is the rose, what the japonica, without the maidens to add to their beauty and sweetness, and to give and take beauty from the fellowship.

Part I of our Civil War collection, A Newspaper Perspective, contains articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York Herald, The Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.
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School History of South Carolina

A Look Inside: School History of South Carolina

As part of our expansion of our American County Histories Collection, we have new volumes coming online every month. On May 1, 2017, the 1864 title School History of South Carolina by John Abney Chapman became available.

This volume is an excellent example of how South Carolina’s state history was taught to students living in the state at the end of the 19th century. Of particular interest to Civil War buffs will be Chapter XL: The War Of Secession. The book’s author had to convey the history to the children and grandchildren of the Confederate soldiers who experienced it first hand.

INTRODUCTION

This book is written for the young, therefore the style is easy and animated. Short stories are occasionally introduced for the purpose of fixing upon the mind of the youthful student the truths of the history which the stories are intended to illustrate.

It has been revised and edited, and the questions have been prepared by practical teachers, so as to adapt it for use in the schoolroom.

It also has a full index, so as to make it useful as a book of handy reference.

South Carolina has a history of which none of her children need be ashamed, and it is the patriotic duty of each citizen to see that every effort is made to keep alive in the minds of each rising generation that reverence for the heroic deeds of our ancestors which inspires youth to emulate examples of bravery, daring and self-sacrifice.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.
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Beaufort County, South Carolina

Slavery in the Early Carolina Colony Days

This passage on the early years of slavery in South Carolina appears in the opening pages of Beaufort County South Carolina — Its Shrines and Early History.

The Need for Labor

Servants were most difficult to get in the early Carolina days. All manner of land grants and gratuities were were offered the servant immigrant from England and Ireland—provided, of course, they were Protestant. But these servants at that time somehow preferred to go further north and up towards Virginia and Maryland and largely to the tobacco lands.

Furthermore, there white servants did not seem adapted to the Carolina coast work; and, furthermore, mortality among them was heavy for we are told so hard was the life for them in the culture of indigo and in the rice swamps. In the ten years prior to 1708 we are told that eighty men and women servants actually had been lost to the colonies, most all of them by death.

Slavery in those days for the slave holder was altogether respectable. To these big Carolina land owners who wanted to grow indigo and rice and who wanted themselves to live in the highlands in mid-summer — to these men the importation of slaves became a necessity.

Furthermore, these Africans as imported were adaptable to the work and to the place and were such ideal laborers and whose labor, too, was so sensationally cheap that we find the Lords Proprietors encouraging slave importation by a head-right of fifty acres. These slaves, therefore, solved the labor problem for these coast plantations.

The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a particular county by using a single query. In addition, those wishing to read or browse the text on a page by page basis may do so in the original format merely by scrolling down the screen and then continuing to the next chapter.

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