Tag Archives: The Christian Recorder
A Slave Romance

“An Old Slave’s Romance”

After the Civil War, The Christian Recorder, like many other papers, included ads from formerly enslaved people hoping to be reunited with family members they had lost as slaves.  This account from 1890 details the reunion of two long-separated spouses.

REUNITED AT 80 WITH THE HUSBAND OF HER YOUTH

A colored woman, bent nearly double with eighty years and a heavy bundle, was seen to board the Cincinnati Mail line packet yesterday afternoon. Approaching the clerk of the boat she slowly untied a knot in the corner of her red bandanna handkerchief and produced enough cash to purchase a deck ticket for Cincinnati. The wrinkled and feeble old Negress is the heroine of a romance.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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Shall they vote

Shall Our Women Vote? (1887)

By Rev. R.Z. Roberts

Whatever may be discussed through the columns of our great Church organ – the RECORDER – this is a question that all should consider. There are many spheres in life to which women have been admitted, in which she was expected to make a successful failure, but instead she has been a success. In school as a student or as a teacher; in the pulpit, at the bar, or issuing medicine to the sick and dying – in any of the above woman has won laurels for herself; and so far she has not failed to wield that sweet and refining influence over men. Yet it is thought that this influence would immediately be sacrificed should she go to the polls and cast her vote. Is it possible that the father, husband and brother become such savages at the polls that they would be entirely beyond the influence of mother, wife, sister or daughter? If so, voting has a low moral tendency. If in other spheres in life woman wields an untold influence, why not at the polls?

In any gathering where women are absent, there is a certain degree of monotony; and men themselves don’t exhibit the culture and refinement in the absence of women that they do when they are present. Men have no right to limit gifts or talents.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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christmas-bells

Christmas Customs

The first traces of Christmas observance found in ancient history are early in the second century, at least prior to A.D. 138. In some churches, the Epiphany and Christmas were celebrated as one festival.

In the fourth century, after an elaborate investigation, the 25th of December was agreed upon, and has ever since been observed throughout Christendom. There may be still more unbelievers, but the historical and astronomical evidence in favor of this day, amounts to almost a demonstration, if such language can ever be applied to that class of testimony.

We derive our Christmas customs more immediately from old England, where it was a religious, domestic and merry making festival, for every rank and every age.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ade.2a03251

The Relation of Education and the Gospel

The Christian Recorder was first published in 1854 under the editorship of the Rev. J.P. Campbell. This early edition was short-lived, however, and in 1861, under the editorship of Elisha Weaver, the New Series, Volume 1 began. Under this new leadership the Recorder was introduced into the South by distribution among the negro regiments in the Union army. Benjamin T. Tanner became editor in 1867, and was followed in that position in 1885 by the Rev. Benjamin F. Lee who served until 1892.

The Christian Recorder embodied secular as well as religious material, and included good coverage of the black regiments together with the major incidents of the Civil War.

Accessible Archive’s collection of The Christian Recorder is complete from 1861 through December 1902; excluding 1892 and can be found within our African American Newspapers Collection.

The Relation of Education and the Gospel

As an humble servant of the Lord Jesus Christ, a believer in, and preacher of, the blessed gospel handed down to the world through his servants, the apostles, from Olivet’s rocky cliffs, under heaven’s fiery command: “Go ye into all the world and as ye go preach, saying the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” We remember with warm emotion the dawn of the Pentecostical morn, when the grief-stricken band of disciples were all assembled together in one place and of one accord. How they heard the rumbling of the wings of an angelic host playing upon the morning zephyrs and the descending of the Holy Ghost out of heaven from God, clothed in effulgent brightness and the very appearance of the Holy Spirit in their midst, drove the sombre clouds of fear and despondence from their once darkened sky; their tongues were loosened as never before. Every spiritual, mental and emotional impulse was fired up with hallowed fire from the burning altar in heaven, and all their nature under the Divine influence of the Holy Spirit was developed into one common holy nature and the divine purpose that was characteristic of one was true of all.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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Work for Women of the Church

This article appeared in the January 19, 1893 issue of the Christian Recorder.

The Christian Recorder is the oldest existing black periodical in America, and the only one in the United States whose existence includes publication both before and after the Civil War.

The first editor of the Christian Recorder was the Reverend M. M. Clark, who was one of the first college graduates in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Clark was a graduate of Jefferson College and was considered to be one of the best-educated men in the A.M.E. Church. He wrote that the Recorder’s focus would be religion, morality, science and literature and it was to treat all geographical areas of the A.M.E. Church equally.

Work for Women of the Church

By Mrs. N. F. Mossell

The above title was given some years back by Rev. T.G. Steward to an able paper that appeared in the Christian Recorder at that time. The paper opened this wise.

Work for Women of the Church

Work for Women of the Church

“The man who will devise some plan whereby the many pious, earnest and intelligent women of our church may employ to a much larger extent their time and talents in the service of the Lord, will confer upon the Church and upon mankind a great benefit.” (The term ‘man’ being used generally.)

Dr. Steward proves within the limits of the above mentioned article that the majority of church members were women. The largest number of literate members were women. That women were more devoted, casting aside as unworthy the charge that women’s devotion was man worship of a masculine ministry, as do we also believing not the masculine ministry, but temperament of woman forms the basis of the fact that she is more easily led toward a life of devotion, Christian or otherwise than is man.

The proportion of earnest, true, Christian women is generally admitted to be greater than that of men. Hence the larger number of educated, pious people and consequently, people best prepared to do work in the church, are to be found among the women, further claims the doctor.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

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