Tag Archives: The Christian Recorder
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The Relation of Education and the Gospel

The Christian Recorder was first published in 1854 under the editorship of the Rev. J.P. Campbell. This early edition was short-lived, however, and in 1861, under the editorship of Elisha Weaver, the New Series, Volume 1 began. Under this new leadership the Recorder was introduced into the South by distribution among the negro regiments in the Union army. Benjamin T. Tanner became editor in 1867, and was followed in that position in 1885 by the Rev. Benjamin F. Lee who served until 1892.

The Christian Recorder embodied secular as well as religious material, and included good coverage of the black regiments together with the major incidents of the Civil War.

Accessible Archive’s collection of The Christian Recorder is complete from 1861 through December 1902; excluding 1892 and can be found within our African American Newspapers Collection.

The Relation of Education and the Gospel

As an humble servant of the Lord Jesus Christ, a believer in, and preacher of, the blessed gospel handed down to the world through his servants, the apostles, from Olivet’s rocky cliffs, under heaven’s fiery command: “Go ye into all the world and as ye go preach, saying the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” We remember with warm emotion the dawn of the Pentecostical morn, when the grief-stricken band of disciples were all assembled together in one place and of one accord. How they heard the rumbling of the wings of an angelic host playing upon the morning zephyrs and the descending of the Holy Ghost out of heaven from God, clothed in effulgent brightness and the very appearance of the Holy Spirit in their midst, drove the sombre clouds of fear and despondence from their once darkened sky; their tongues were loosened as never before. Every spiritual, mental and emotional impulse was fired up with hallowed fire from the burning altar in heaven, and all their nature under the Divine influence of the Holy Spirit was developed into one common holy nature and the divine purpose that was characteristic of one was true of all.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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Work for Women of the Church

This article appeared in the January 19, 1893 issue of the Christian Recorder.

The Christian Recorder is the oldest existing black periodical in America, and the only one in the United States whose existence includes publication both before and after the Civil War.

The first editor of the Christian Recorder was the Reverend M. M. Clark, who was one of the first college graduates in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Clark was a graduate of Jefferson College and was considered to be one of the best-educated men in the A.M.E. Church. He wrote that the Recorder’s focus would be religion, morality, science and literature and it was to treat all geographical areas of the A.M.E. Church equally.

Work for Women of the Church

By Mrs. N. F. Mossell

The above title was given some years back by Rev. T.G. Steward to an able paper that appeared in the Christian Recorder at that time. The paper opened this wise.

Work for Women of the Church

Work for Women of the Church

“The man who will devise some plan whereby the many pious, earnest and intelligent women of our church may employ to a much larger extent their time and talents in the service of the Lord, will confer upon the Church and upon mankind a great benefit.” (The term ‘man’ being used generally.)

Dr. Steward proves within the limits of the above mentioned article that the majority of church members were women. The largest number of literate members were women. That women were more devoted, casting aside as unworthy the charge that women’s devotion was man worship of a masculine ministry, as do we also believing not the masculine ministry, but temperament of woman forms the basis of the fact that she is more easily led toward a life of devotion, Christian or otherwise than is man.

The proportion of earnest, true, Christian women is generally admitted to be greater than that of men. Hence the larger number of educated, pious people and consequently, people best prepared to do work in the church, are to be found among the women, further claims the doctor.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

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Drought and Rain – Environmentalism 1866

On this subject the Boston Journal makes the following interesting remarks:

It seems to have been ascertained historically, that in countries like France, Italy, Spain, and Palestine, which have been largely cleared of woods, the annual fall of rain is less now than it was formerly. On the other hand, extensive tree planting in Egypt and Scotland have been followed by more rain yearly than was previously known in those sections.

These are certainly curious results if truly reported. They are attributed in part to the attraction of upright masses of trees for the rain clouds and to other influences not well understood. But however this may be, it is clear to the common sense of every observing man, that a country abounding in woods will retain its average fall of rain longer, and turn it to better account, than a country that is bare. In the latter the wind has a clean sweep over the whole surface, drying up and baking the soil, exhausting the springs and water courses. When the snow melts in the spring , or heavy rains fall, there is nothing to detain the water, but rushes off in sudden, destructive freshets, gullying the land and bearing away its richness.

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Group of Negro women at revival meeting, La Forge, Missouri

Ladies Should Read Newspapers (1861)

This appeared in an 1861 issue of The Christian Recorder.  It is important to note that this publication was produced and sold primarily within African American society and this issue came out while it was still illegal in some places for black slaves in the south to be taught to read at all.

It is a great mistake in female education to keep a young lady’ s time and attention devoted to only the fashionable literature of the day. If you would qualify her for conversation you must give her something to talk about, give her education with the actual world and its transpiring events.

Urge her to read newspapers and become familiar with the present character and improvements of our race. History is of some importance, but the past world is dead, and we have little comparatively to do with it. Our thoughts and our concerns should be for the present world, to know what it is and improve its condition.

Let her have an intelligent conversation concerning the mental, political, and religious improvements of our time. Let the gilded annuals and poems on the centre table be kept a part of the time covered with journals. Let the family – men, women a children – read the newspapers.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source:  The Christian Recorder, May 4, 1861
Image Details:  Group of women at a 1938 revival meeting, La Forge, Missouri (LOC)


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Glorious News – Slavery Abolished from the Constitution

We have the pleasure of chronicling in this issue of our paper, for the benefit of our readers, the thrilling and joyous intelligence that on the last day of January, 1865, the House of Representatives of the United States voted to amend the Constitution, so as to cause it to read as follows:

Article XIII

Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”

This was carried by a vote of 119 for the amendment, to 56 in opposition to it. Thus is has passed by a two-third vote. The Constitution of the United States is now amended beyond doubt.

The Lord be praised for his great work of reformation in the hearts of the American people. We know that this welcome news will gladden the hearts of all patriots and true lovers of God and humanity, freedom and liberty. We hope that our Legislatures will act wisely in the premises. Once more may the old State House Bell ring forth, as in days of yore, proclaiming Liberty throughout the land – proclaiming that the martyrs of today have not cast their lives away in vain. A wild hum of joy comes to our ears on the dancing breeze as the bondman’s shackles fall, and we can almost hear the glad cry gushing like a fountain from his heart – “O God, we thank thee.”

Source: The Christian Recorder, February 4, 1865