Tag Archives: The Colored American
Sin of Slavery

The Church in Fault; The Sin of Slavery (1838)

The great sin of slavery and caste as they exist in this country, do more to neutralize the means of grace, and block up the way of salvation, than all other things combined. Slavery is THE SIN of the nation and caste, THE SIN of the Church; and if these sins need not to be prayed and wept over – if they need not to be repented of an removed, then may all sin be tolerated.

If it be not the business and duty of the ministers of Jesus Christ, to set themselves at work, to convince the world, and especially the Church of these sins, then have the ministers nothing to do in the church militant; the sooner they go home to heaven, the better.

If we were to judge from the silence on these subjects, of ministers in the northern sections of the church, and the practice of these evils by ministers in the southern sections, we should conclude that oppression, the most cruel and unreasonable oppression, was no crime. But, alas! we cannot judge ;by this fallible standard; God has in his word, and by his providence, told us to the contrary. Oppression is the antipode of Christian charity. No sin in the history of the church nor world, has so readily provoked the wrath, and brought down the vengeance of God upon the nations, as oppression. In all ages, Jehovah has seemed, without the semblance of pity, to pour out his judgments upon oppressors. And yet do the clergy of our land SLEEP over this sin!!!

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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Ohio

The Barbaric Laws of Ohio in 1837

The ILLEGAL enactments of Ohio, are extremely oppressive to her colored population. – These LAWS were made by our Western Fathers, in the reign of wolves and bears.*  They are vestiges of backwoods barbarism, and never were intended for this enlightened day.

The first settlers passed them, merely to guard themselves against too great an ingress of worn-out slaves, set free from Kentucky and other slave states. They intended them, merely, as a protection, for the time being, that would be superseded by civilization and education. The axe and the hoe, before which the western forests have fled, should long since, have come in contact with all these unequal, unrighteous, and injurious laws.

The state legislature has been memorialized several times on the subject. The voice of the people has called, LOUDLY, for the repeal of the oppressive code, yet the members have stuck to it, with the same KIND of tenacity, that the Haytians do, to the usages of their fathers, in working their oxen by their horns. They have no other good reason. OUR FATHERS MADE THESE LAWS, and we must not BREAK THEM, is the VERY BEST apology, that possibly can be made, for their existence in this light and liberal age.

For the benefit of such of our readers, as are not acquainted with the disabilities to which our brethren in Ohio are subjected, we will mention a few of them. They exist, under a clause, of the old constitution of the state, in which colored men are denied a residence in the State, without bonds and freehold security, for good behaviour, and as an indemnity against their ever becoming a public charge. They are denied the right of suffrage, and of giving testimony against a white man, in any case, or any circumstances whatever. (more…)


home-library

Tips on Building a Household Library (1838)

In order to obtain a good library, which every family ought to have, the following directions may be observed with advantage:

  • Select a room, or at least a corner of some room, where the Bible and other books, together with inkstand and paper, shall be kept. Every house ought to have a room for retirement, prayer and study.
  • Obtain a good, convenient book case, and writing table or desk, or both. Let the dust be brushed off, daily used, and kept constantly neat and clean.
  • Whenever a book has been taken into another room for use, let it always be returned to the library for safe keeping.
  • Avoid subscribing for books, unless you feel that the book cannot be published without a subscription, and you do it either as an act of benevolence to the author, or for the purpose of doing good to the world.
  • Lay out your money carefully. Buy no books but good ones. Select the best. Seek to make, from month to month, some increase to the library. Teach your children, servants and friends, to use the books with care.
  • Admit no novels.
  • Select, in addition to religious works, books of reference, school books, scientific works, and philosophical, etc. – a few of the best productions of the best poets.
  • In all departments, get works of established and solid reputation.


By pursuing this course a few years, every farmer and mechanic can have a library which will be of great value to his children, when he is gone, as well as to himself while living.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Source

Collection: African American Newspapers
Publication: The Colored American
Date: July 7, 1838
Title: Household Libraries
Location: New York, New York


taking-the-census

Summary of the 1840 Census in the Colored American

We have received from Washington an epitome of the census of the United States. For want of room, the insertion of the tables must be deferred – for the present we insert the following summary. Unwilling to make statements founded upon the incorrect returns of the marshals various calculations which have appeared in the newspapers from time to time, based upon them, have not been inserted. Having now the correct returns, in our future numbers, we shall proceed to make our own calculations from them so far as it respects the population – the returns of the products of the States not yet being completed.

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The Bottle

A Victim and his Child in The Colored American

We occasionally find a capital police report in the St. Louis Bulletin. On a recent occasion a bloated being, named Johnson, by profession an actor, was found drunk in the streets by a good hearted sailor, who in vain attempted to win him from his vile ways and evil companions. Johnson continued to drink, until he fell to the ground like a beast, when the following scene ensued;

“Just as they were about removing the miserable wretch to prison, a little girl about eight years old, barefooted and extremely ragged, came into the room sobbing and crying most bitterly. No sooner did she see her father than she ran to him, knelt down by his side, and motioning the officer away, cried – “Don’t take away papa while he sleeps! By and by he will wake up once more and kiss me.”

The Colored AmericanIt was a sight to wring the heart of more than man to see that pure and innocent creature, with her little head bare and her white shoulder peeping out from her tattered frock, leaning with fond affection over her drunken father, as if her affection strengthened with the unworthiness of its object. At length the sailor came forward, and speaking kindly to the little girl, took her away in his arms, and wrapped her little feet carefully in the skirts of his coat. The brutish father, by this time snoring in complete and disgusting insensibility, was then taken to the guard house for the purpose of sobering him.

This morning, after manifesting some symptoms of that most dreadful of diseases – mania [ ], he seemed to regain his senses in a measure, and confessed having been drunk, “I was not,” said he, “always the miserable wretch to which drunkenness has reduced me. I once was respected by friends, and beloved by my family. But I contracted bad habits, which got so strong and old upon my nervous temperament as to make a beast of me. My business was neglected, and my wife died, I do believe of a broken heart. Since that time I have wandered around the world without end or aim, except to procure whiskey! I have yet a daughter – at least I had yesterday – a beautiful, tender creature, who still loves me, despite my unworthiness.”

At this moment the benevolent sailor entered the room, leading the little girl by the hand. He had dressed her with new and comfortable clothes, and she looked really very pretty and interesting. After learning that a small fine had been imposed upon Johnson, he immediately paid it, and leading the little girl forward, placed her in her father’s arms. The poor man wept and sobbed over her as if he had been an infant: and for our part, we do not believe there was dry eye in the room. The three left the room together, and we sincerely hope that this lesson will work a thorough reformation upon the unhappy and degraded man.”

Now, my youthful readers, was not this an affectionate, good little girl? And do you not, while you read about her love her? And will you not try to be like her, although, we presume and hope, you have not a drunken father as this little girl had?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

Collection: African American Newspapers
Publication: The Colored American
Date: April 11, 1840
Title: A Victim and his Child
Location: New York, New York