Tag Archives: The Liberator
Lieutenant Samuel K. Thompson of Co. C, 54th U.S. Colored Troops Infantry Regiment with unidentified soldiers posed with a Columbiad cannon at an earthwork fort. (1863)

Reception of the Colored Soldiers at Harrisburg

Harrisburg, Nov. 14.

This is a day that will long be remembered by the colored people of the State of Pennsylvania. In view of the large number of colored soldiers who are coming home, many of whom pass through this city, it was determined by the colored people of this city that they should have a fitting reception accorded to them. A committee was at once organized, and Mr. George E. Stevens, one of the original members of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteers, who was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant for bravery at Fort Wagner, was selected to carry the arrangements into execution.

All last evening the streets were fairly alive with the soldiers, and their friends, but there was not the slightest confusion, and nowhere was there to be seen any insubordination. They remembered that all were looking upon them, and conducted themselves in a worthy manner.

Simon Cameron

Simon Cameron

But today was the great epoch. At nine o’clock the procession began to form on State street, north of the Capitol, and by ten o’clock the column was in motion. T. Morris Chester, of this city, acted as chief marshal assisted by a number of aids. They then passed through a number of streets to the residence of General Simon Cameron on Front Street. The line was drawn up in front of his house, when the old patriot appeared and was received with all the honors. He then spoke as follows:

I cannot let this opportunity pass without thanking the African soldiers for the compliment they have paid ate, hat more than all to thank them for the great service which they have been to their country in the terrible rebellion. I never doubted that the people of African descent would play a great part in this struggle, and I am proud to My that all my anticipations have been more than realized. Your services offered in the early part of the war, were refused; but when the struggle became one of life and death, then the country gladly received you, and. thank God, you nobly redeemed all you promised. [Applause.]

Like all other men, you have your destinies in your own hands, and if you continue to conduct yourselves hereafter as you have in this struggle, you will have all the rights you ask for, alt the rights that belong to human beings. [Applause] I can, only say again that I thank you from my heart for all that you have done for your country, and I know the country will hold you in grateful remembrance.

I cannot close without saying that there is at the head of the National Government a greet man, who is able and determined to deal justly with all. I know that with his approval, no State that was in rebellion will be allowed to return to the benefits of the Union, without Brat having a constitutional compact which will prevent slavery in the hind for all time to come; which will make all men equal before the law; which will prescribe no distinction of color on the witness-stand. and in the jury-box; and which will protect the homes and the domestic relations of all men and all women. He will insist too on the repudiation of all debts contracted for the support of the war of the rebellion. Remember, when the war began, there were 4.000,000 of slaves in this country, protected by law. Now all men are made free by the law. Thank God for all this! for He alone has accomplished the work!

William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator was a weekly abolitionist newspaper published in Boston. The paper held true to the founder’s ideals. Garrison was a journalistic crusader who advocated the immediate emancipation of all slaves and gained a national reputation for being one of the most radical of American abolitionists.
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liberator-1831-05-07

The Liberator: A Race for Liberty

William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator was a weekly abolitionist newspaper published in Boston. The paper held true to the founder’s ideals. Garrison was a journalistic crusader who advocated the immediate emancipation of all slaves and gained a national reputation for being one of the most radical of American abolitionists.

A Race for Liberty

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD — ‘Ranaway from the subscriber, living in Washington City, on the 1st day of June, a Negro man, named Vincent Scoot. He is twenty-one years old, five feet, six or eight inches high, straight and well formed; he is an excellent house servant, carriage driver, and ostler; he acted as a waiter to my son Lieut. Henry Stewart, five years, in the Western army. He has a scar on his right arm, near the elbow, and about two and a half inches in length, and half an inch wide.’

— A Southern Paper

The above scar was no doubt received in rescuing his master from death, or fighting in defense of his country’s liberties, who, with five years’ campaign, together with shedding his blood in sustaining the independence of his county, is denied the pleasure of running away to enjoy it, while the humane master, instead of rewarding him for his services— offers a reward for his apprehension as a slave. The above sketch, delineated by a skillful hand, would make a beautiful frontispiece to the literary works of every American writer of taste.

— African Sentinel

Source:  The Liberator, May 7, 1831


Arundel Plantation, Slave Cabin, Intersection of Routes 701 and 4, Georgetown, Georgetown County, SC. -- Jack E. Boucher, photographer.

Hopewell South Carolina’s 1836 Presbytery on Slavery

pres·by·tery noun \ˈprez-bə-ˌter-ē, ˈpres-, -bə-trē\ – A group of ministers and elders who are the leaders of the Presbyterian churches in a particular area.

William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator was a weekly abolitionist newspaper published in Boston. The paper held true to the founder’s ideals. Garrison was a journalistic crusader who advocated the immediate emancipation of all slaves and gained a national reputation for being one of the most radical of American abolitionists.

REFUGE OF OPPRESSION: HOPEWELL S.C. PRESBYTERY ON SLAVERY.

The Committee on ‘Instructions to Commissioners to General Assembly,’ made the following report, which was accepted and adopted.

Anticipating the discussion of various vitally important matters at the approaching session of the General Assembly, the Presbytery of Hopewell takes this opportunity to instruct its delegates to that body, concerning the course which we desire them to pursue on certain matters.

The last General Assembly appointed a Committee to report on the general subject of domestic slavery in these United States. And from the movements of certain ecclesiastical bodies in our church — from the course pursued by some of our political bodies — and from the known views of some members of the Committee referred to, we are induced to apprehend that abolition will be introduced through the report, or by the agency of other members. On the subject of domestic slavery, this Presbytery believe the following facts have been most incontrovertibly established, viz:

I. Slavery has existed in the Church of God from the time of Abraham to this day. Members of the church of God have held slaves bought with their money, and born in their houses; and this relation is not only recognized, but its duties are defined clearly, both in the Old and New Testaments.

II. Emancipation is not mentioned among the duties of the Master to his slave. While obedience ‘even to the froward’ Master is enjoined upon the slave.

III. No instance can be produced of an otherwise orderly Christian, being reproved much less ex-communicated from the church, for the single act of holding domestic slaves, from the days of Abraham down to the date of the modern Abolitionists.

IV. Slavery existed in the United States before our ecclesiastical body was organized. It is not condemned in our Confession of Faith, and has always existed in our Church without reproof or condemnation.

V. Slavery is a political institution, with which the Church has nothing to do, except to inculcate the duties of Master and Slave, and to use lawful, spiritual means to have all, both bond and free, to become one in Christ by faith.

Regarding these positions as undoubtedly true, our views of duty constrain us to adopt the following resolutions.

Resolved, That the political institution of domestic Slavery, as it exists in the South, is not a lawful or constitutional subject of discussion, much less of action by the General Assembly.

Resolved, That so soon as the General Assembly passes any ecclesiastical laws, or recommends any action, which shall interfere with this institution, this Presbytery will regard such laws and acts as tyrannical and odious– and from that moment will regard itself independent of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church.

Resolved, That our delegates to the approaching Assembly are hereby enjoined to use all Christian means to prevent the discussion of domestic slavery in the Assembly– to protest in our name against all acts that involve or approve abolition– and to withdraw from the Assembly and return home, if in spite of their efforts, acts of this character shall be passed.

The Liberator on June 11, 1836

Image Details: Arundel Plantation, Slave Cabin, Intersection of Routes 701 and 4, Georgetown, Georgetown County, SC. — Jack E. Boucher, photographer.


Millard-Fillmore

Happy Birthday Millard Fillmore

Millard Fillmore, 13th President of the United States and the last Whig President, was born January 7, 1800.

President Fillmore was a fascinating figure who does not get the attention his life and legacy deserves and there are plenty of people around who are still passionate about sharing information about him.  You can learn more at Happy birthday, Millard Fillmore! 214 today, not looking a day over 117.

On Fillmore’s retirement, William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator had this to say on December 24, 1852:

When Millard Fillmore is forgotten by the American people, we shall have fallen upon evil times. But he will never be forgotten by the brave, the patriotic, the true. The foundations of his fame are laid in honor, patriotism, and truth, and can never be shaken. As long as parity of purpose: self-sacrificing devotion to country, the whole Union, and nothing but the Union; enlarged and pendent statesmanship; and absorbing desire to vindicate the honor and interests of the country in all intercourse with foreign nations; sagacious and farseeing recommendations to Congress in regard to internal policy; the expression of an inflexible determination to maintain the compromises of the Constitution, and execute the laws under the same; a fervid anxiety to unite all sections in bonds of fraternal affection, and to draw closer the ties which bind us together cemented by and baptized in the blood of our revolutionary ancestors so long, we say, as such deeds have an abiding place in the hearts of the freeman of this glorious land, the name of Millard Fillmore will be held in affectionate, undying remembrance.

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La_Amistad_ship

The Amistad Goes on Sale

This famous schooner, and her cargo, are to be sold at New London on the 15th inst. by order of the U.S. Circuit Court for the district of Connecticut.

The cargo consists of dry goods, hardware, crockery, vermicilli, etc.. selected for a Spanish market. Also a mill for grinding sugar cane.

The negroes of the Amistad are still at (Westville) New Haven, in charge of Mr. Wilcox, the U.S. Marshal and are very comfortably situated. Their case is now in the hands of the Supreme Court of the U. States, who meet at Washington in January next.

If the court confirms the decision of the court below, the Africans will be immediately set at liberty.

Source

Collection: The Liberator
Publication: The Liberator
Date: October 9, 1840
Title: The Amistad
Location: Boston, Massachusetts

About La Amistad

Amistad, a Spanish slave ship, left Havana, Cuba for Puerto Principe, Cuba. The ship carried 53 Mende captives (49 adults and 4 children), who had been captured from today’s Sierra Leone to be sold into slavery in Cuba. On July 2, Sengbe Pieh (later known in the United States as Joseph Cinqué) led the captives in a revolt against their captors.

Sengbe Pieh (later known in the United States as Joseph Cinqué)

Sengbe Pieh (later known in the United States as Joseph Cinqué)

The Mende had been brought into Havana aboard the larger specialized vessel Tecora and were being taken to a smaller port closer to a sugar plantation. In the main hold below decks, the captives found a rusty file. Freeing themselves, they quickly went up on deck and, armed with machete-like cane knives, successfully gained control of the ship and killed the captain and other crew members.

When they demanded to be returned home, the ship’s navigator, Don Pedro Montez, deceived them about their course and sailed the ship north along the North American coast to the eastern tip of Long Island, New York. Discovered by the Revenue Cutter USRC Washington, La Amistad was taken into custody.

The Mende were interned at New Haven, Connecticut, while the courts settled their legal status and conflicting claims regarding La Amistad’s ownership.

The illustration below is from “A history of the Amistad captives – being a circumstantial account of the capture of the Spanish schooner Amistad by the Africans on board, their voyage and capture near Long Island, New York, with biographical sketches of each of the surviving Africans: also, an account of the trials had on their case, before the district and circuit courts of the United States for the district of Connecticut.”

Slave Holding Area in La Amistad

Slave Holding Area in La Amistad

This 34 page pamphlet was published in 1840 and can be read below: