Tag Archives: The Lily
Sleeping Cupid

Women as Sculptors (1856)

A girl may shape vases in clay quite as easily as flowers in needle-work or tapestry. And why not? Some of the most beautiful specimens of ancient and modern art come to us in this form and of these rude materials.

The art is an exquisite one, and should commend itself especially to the women of our country. The notion that working in clay or marble is unfiled for a female hand or genius, is pure absurdity. The labor is not drudgery—it is art, rather than labor, that is needed for it, and it is one of those arts which may give exercise to many others.

The vase, beautifully wrought, into a noble and classic form, may be covered with exquisite landscapes, to which the baking process will almost ensure, while the vessel remains unbroken, eternal duration.

To encourage the timid ambition, we may mention that one of the European princesses of the present day, has acquired high distinction among living sculptors for her achievements in marble.

—W. Gilmore Simms

Source: The Lily – March 15, 1856
Top Image: Natalia Andriolli, Sleeping Cupid (Cupid with a Lily) 1896 / A graceful and sweet version of Classicism inspired by Antonio Canova’s style, strongly influenced by 19th-century sentimentalism. Natalia Andriolli studied in Paris, where she had her atelier, in which she created her portrait sculptures, genre compositions and artistic ceramics. She was awarded a gold medal at the Paris Salon in 1896 for this sculpture.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

mother sermon

A Short Sermon for Parents (1850)

It is said that when the mother of Washington was asked how she had formed the character of her son, she replied that she had early endeavored to teach him three things; obedience, diligence, and truth. No better advice can be given by any parent.

Teach your children to obey. Let it be the first lesson. You can hardly begin to soon. It requires constant care to keep up the habit of obedience, and especially to do it in such a way as not to break down the strength of the child’s character.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Woman’s Great Needs in The Lily, October 1856

This essay by Mrs. E. P. F. B. of Michigan appeared in the October 1856 issue of The Lily.

Published in Seneca Falls, New York and priced at 50 cents a year, The Lily began as a temperance journal for “home distribution” among members of the Seneca Falls Ladies Temperance Society. Although women’s exclusion from membership in temperance societies and other reform activities was the main force behind the The Lily, it was not initially a radical paper.

The editor, Amelia Bloomer, was greatly influenced by Stanton and gradually became a convert to the cause of women’s rights. She also became interested in dress reform, advocating that women wear the outfit that came to be known as the “Bloomer costume.”

Woman’s Great Needs

A self-sustaining Independence is the great good which is to emancipate woman — mental, moral, physical independence. She must assert her right to self, that God-given right which it is a blasphemy to desecrate. Until she respects this right, and successfully defends it, she will be the humble victim of abused power — a hopeless, helpless slave.

We talk of purity? There can be no purity without freedom. We may have a forced chastity — a forced purity never.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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women-working

Do Women Ever Do Any Hard Work?

It is a very common saying by many persons who are opposed to the Woman’s Rights question, that the women never claim the right to do any of the hard and laborious work; all they want is the right to do any of the easy kind, and leave the hard work for the men to do.

But such is not the fact; and if such objectors would take a journey into Europe they would find that the women did their share of hard work as well as men, particularly in Germany and France. Also in England, go into the harvest fields, and you will find the women reaping down the wheat, all day long, and receiving the same wages as the men; go into the hay fields and the women are there; look into the fields of barley, beans, oats, peas and turnips, and the women are there; ’tis true they don’t do any of the mowing, but they perform various sorts of labor there, the like of which is seldom seen in this country; to be sure a great deal of it is of a very healthy character, and has a beneficial effect upon the constitution.

You will find the women in all the large Gardens, Shrubberies and Orchards at work; and in the Dairies, there they are, milking the cows, and making the butter and cheese.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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A Word for the Poor in The Lily

This appeal for help for the poor, penned by Helen Bruce, appeared in The Lily in the March 1855 issue.

A Word for the Poor

Winter is here—a winter in the midst of fearfully hard times, and we are surrounded with the starving poor. Why are our cities thronged with helpless paupers, when there are thousands of acres of land overflowing with nature’s bounty, waiting for them to come and take possession? If all this waste population could only be turned out to thrive and fatten, to grow light-hearted and joyous upon those rich unoccupied lands, what a blessed thing it would be. But they are not there—they are here, and they crowd, steaming and half-smothering into cellars and garrets, and live in destitution and distress.

Hundreds who are willing to work cannot get work, and they must beg, steal or starve. One poor widow in Brooklyn, two weeks before Christmas, went for three days without a single meal for herself and her five children! She had not been used to beg, but actual starvation drove her to it at last. This is but one case out of thousands.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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