Tag Archives: The Lily
women-working

Do Women Ever Do Any Hard Work?

It is a very common saying by many persons who are opposed to the Woman’s Rights question, that the women never claim the right to do any of the hard and laborious work; all they want is the right to do any of the easy kind, and leave the hard work for the men to do.

But such is not the fact; and if such objectors would take a journey into Europe they would find that the women did their share of hard work as well as men, particularly in Germany and France. Also in England, go into the harvest fields, and you will find the women reaping down the wheat, all day long, and receiving the same wages as the men; go into the hay fields and the women are there; look into the fields of barley, beans, oats, peas and turnips, and the women are there; ’tis true they don’t do any of the mowing, but they perform various sorts of labor there, the like of which is seldom seen in this country; to be sure a great deal of it is of a very healthy character, and has a beneficial effect upon the constitution.

You will find the women in all the large Gardens, Shrubberies and Orchards at work; and in the Dairies, there they are, milking the cows, and making the butter and cheese.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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A Word for the Poor in The Lily

This appeal for help for the poor, penned by Helen Bruce, appeared in The Lily in the March 1855 issue.

A Word for the Poor

Winter is here—a winter in the midst of fearfully hard times, and we are surrounded with the starving poor. Why are our cities thronged with helpless paupers, when there are thousands of acres of land overflowing with nature’s bounty, waiting for them to come and take possession? If all this waste population could only be turned out to thrive and fatten, to grow light-hearted and joyous upon those rich unoccupied lands, what a blessed thing it would be. But they are not there—they are here, and they crowd, steaming and half-smothering into cellars and garrets, and live in destitution and distress.

Hundreds who are willing to work cannot get work, and they must beg, steal or starve. One poor widow in Brooklyn, two weeks before Christmas, went for three days without a single meal for herself and her five children! She had not been used to beg, but actual starvation drove her to it at last. This is but one case out of thousands.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Asylum

Crazy Jane: A Temperance Story

The Lily, the first newspaper for women, was issued from 1849 until 1853 under the editorship of Amelia Bloomer (1818-1894).  Published in Seneca Falls, New York and priced at 50 cents a year, the newspaper began as a temperance journal for “home distribution” among members of the Seneca Falls Ladies Temperance Society, which had formed in 1848.

Most issues contained at least one anecdotal tale highlighting the dangers of alcohol abuse.

Crazy Jane

A few months ago, we visited the Poor House in a certain county in this state, and after being shown the various departments, the gentlemanly keeper conducted us to rooms occupied by the insane, where we beheld a strange melee of strange beings, among whom was a female, in whose countenance we detected the remains of an almost unearthly beauty—and while ruminating upon the probable cause of the apparent change, she suddenly darted forward, and throwing her arms around our neck, imprinted a burning kiss upon our cheek, while she addressed us in the most refined language, as her husband, making earnest inquires for her dear little Mary, and a great number of others, probably her former friends and associates. It was not until we had answered all her questions, and satisfied her as far as our fancy enabled us to, that she could be induced to relax her hold upon us, and not then until she had exacted a solemn promise that we would visit her again soon, accompanied by little Mary.

As we left the room, and the door closed behind us, which shut out the world from the unfortunate inmates, Jane (for so the keeper called the object of our attention) hurried to the grated window, and kissing her hand, bade us remember our engagement to visit her again soon. As we turned from her there was an expression on her countenance—a strange commingling of joy and grief, which still haunts our memory—visits us amid the busy scenes of life—and which an age would not suffice to efface from our memory.

An interest thus naturally awakened, led us to inquire into the history of “Crazy Jane,” as we afterwards learned was the cognomen assigned her by the citizens of the vicinity. The story is soon told. 

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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fretting

On Fretting from The Lily, 1856

Source: The Lily, February 15, 1856, the first newspaper for women, was issued from 1849 until 1853 under the editorship of Amelia Bloomer (1818-1894).

Published in Seneca Falls, New York and priced at 50 cents a year, the newspaper began as a temperance journal for “home distribution” among members of the Seneca Falls Ladies Temperance Society, which had formed in 1848.

On Fretting

“Fret not thyself,” says the Psalmist. Mankind have a proneness to fret themselves. Their business does not prosper according to their expectations; customers do not pay promptly; competition is sharp; those in whom they have confided prove treacherous; malice and envy hurl their envenomed shafts; domestic affairs go contrariwise; the wicked seem to prosper, while the righteous are abased. In every lot there is ample material to make a god of, which may pierce and wrankle in our souls, if we are only so disposed.

Fretting is of the nature of certain diseases, assuming various types. Diseases is sometimes acute—coming on suddenly in the midst of health, and with but little premonition, raging violently through the system, causing fever and racking pains; soon reaching its crisis, and rapidly running its course, either to kill or to be cured. So with fretting. At times it overtakes the constitutionally and habitually patient and gentle. Strong provocation assails them unawares, throws them off their guard, upsets their equanimity, and causes an overflow of spleen that they did not know was in them to that degree. Even the gentle may thus have occasion to take heed to the injunction, “Fret not”

Diseases, however, often assume the chronic type, becoming embedded in the system, deranging its organs, interfering with the performance of the natural and healthful functions, and lingering year after year, like a vampire, to extract the vital juices. In like manner fretting becomes chronic. Peevishness, irritability, censoriousness, complaining, indulged in, assume a habit; gaining thereby strength and power, until the prevailing tempter is fretfulness. It argues a sadly diseased condition of the soul, when this distemper becomes one of its fixtures. To such an one everything goes wrong. The whole mechanism of society is thrown out of gear; instead of moving smoothly, as when lubricated by the oil of kindness and charity, its cogs clash, and its pivots all grate harshly.

Neither wealth nor birth, but mind only, should be the aristocracy of a free people.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

Source: The Lily, February 15, 1856


mens-fashions

“Male Bloomers” in The Lily, 1854

Under this head many of our brother editors are aiming their wit and ridicule at those gentlemen who have donned the Shawl as a comfortable article of wearing apparel in cold weather.

There is a class of men who seem to think it their especial business to superintend the wardrobes of both men and women, and if any dare to depart from their ideas of propriety, they forthwith launch out into all sorts of witticisms and hard names, and proclaim their opinions, their likes and dislikes, with all the importance of authorized dictators. As to the Shawl, it would be well if it could be banished from use entirely; as it is an inconvenient and injurious article of apparel, owing to its requiring both hands to keep it on, and thereby tending to contract the chest, and cause stooping shoulders.

American Fashions, 1849-50

American Fashions, 1849-50

But if worn at all, men have the same right to it that women have. If they find it comfortable, that is enough; and no one has a right to object to their wearing it because women wear shawls. The sack coats of the men, and the sacks of the women at the present time are cut very nearly after the same pattern. Both find them comfortable and convenient, without being burdensome. The hands are left free to swing at the sides, or use at pleasure, and the form may be carried erect, with shoulders thrown back and chest expanded. This is the most comfortable and useful garment for the street, for both men and women, ever introduced; — and must either dispense with this comfortable garment because it is worn by the other?

In the judgment of these teachers of propriety, one or the other sex should relinquish this coat, and some new style of overcoat be introduced for the party which is deprived of the privilege of wearing this one. There is the same reason for raising a cry about this garment, as about the shawl. Indeed, we think the shawl of right belongs to the men; as it answers so well to the description of the garment prescribed for them in Duet. 22. 12: “Thou shalt make thee fringes upon the four quarters of thy vesture wherewith thou coverest thyself.” True, men have departed from this injunction in former years, and resigned to woman the dress prescribed for themselves, and worn by their fathers in olden times. But that is no reason why they should not again resume it.

In our opinion people have a right to wear about what they please — what may suit their own wants, or their fancy; and while we claim the right to decide for ourself in our own case, we accord the largest liberty to our brothers and sisters in the same matter. Let each one study to please himself and herself, and –let other people mind their own business.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.