Tag Archives: Woman Suffrage
Married Men for War

Married Men for War (1917)

This item appeared in the July 1917 issue of The Remonstrance. The Remonstrance was the official publication of the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women. First published annually and later quarterly in Boston from February, 1890 until October, 1913, it provided a forum for women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women.

Married Men for War

Miss Rankin, the Montana Congresswoman, who gained a conspicuous place in the headlines by her sobbing vote against war, has her own ideas as to how war, when it must come, should be carried on.

The old principle is “Old men for counsel, young men for war.” Miss Rankin would reverse this. She would send the fathers of families to war, because they have already done their duty in domestic relations, but she would exempt “the young men who have not as yet selected their life-mates” and become fathers of children.

The effect of this plan upon military efficiency is something which Miss Rankin does not think it necessary to take into consideration. Nothing would contribute more surely to the triumph of the enemy than sending out armies of the aged and middle-aged to face the German armies. But that, again, does not matter to Miss Rankin.

The Lowell Courier-Citizen of April 28, is abundantly justified in its sharp comment:

Miss Rankin’s successive exhibitions do not tend to make us much more enthusiastic toward the prospect of a House and Senate made up, on the 50–50 basis, of anxious ladies and mediocre gentlemen. Superficial conversations would indicate that her career thus far has landed the suffrage cause the most decided wallop that it has sustained in a decade. We can do with very, very few of these feministic representatives, if the present sample is to be taken as indicating the general trend.

Source: The Remonstrance, July 1917

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

Anti-Suffragists America First and Always

Anti-Suffragists: America First and Always

The Remonstrance was the official publication of the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women. It provided a forum for women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women.

Scholarship has focused largely on the historical developments of the suffrage movement, with the presence of female opponents of suffrage and anti-suffragist organizations receiving less attention. These anti-suffragists were vocal in their opposition to the suffragists who represented a threat to their ideal of womanhood. While female suffragists largely ignored them at that time, it is important to acknowledge their presence in American history.

This unsigned essay painting the suffragists as disloyal and un-American appeared during the ramp up to American engagement in the first World War.

America First and Always

(The Remonstrance, July 1917) This is the motto of anti-suffragists. During the great struggle into which the United States has been forced, they will give the first place, in their thoughts and activities, to their country. In every possible way, through their own organizations, through the National League for Woman’s Service, through the Red Cross, through other organizations and individually, they will contribute unsparingly to the triumph of the national cause and the supplying of the national needs. The promises of service which they have made to the President of the United States, to the Governors of the several states and to municipal authorities will be kept, in spirit and in letter.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Consent of the Governed

Suffrage is Not a Natural Right

The Remonstrance was the official publication of the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women. First published annually and later quarterly in Boston from February, 1890 until October, 1913, it provided a forum for women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women.

Suffrage Not a Natural Right

(The Remonstrance, January 1894) It is further urged that discriminating against women at the polls is an implication of inferiority and an indignity to her sex. Not so is it generally regarded by women. The average woman deems her duties respectable, and about as onerous as she cares to assume, and feels no need of the honor the ballot would confer. Thirty years of faithful missionary labor have failed to make her realize that she is suffering for want of it.

Woman, it is further claimed, is a citizen having natural right to the ballot, and as all just government rests on the consent of the governed, it is unjust to deprive her of all share in choice of rulers and to exact obedience to laws in making which she has no part. This is absurd and atheistic. The right to govern does not rest upon the consent of the governed. The divine authority, to which all rightful human authority is subordinate, rests on no such basis. God never asked permission to reign. The right of the parent to govern does not rest on the consent of his children. Right to punish the criminal does not rest on his consent to be punished. Governments were ordained to govern, not to be governed. The right or duty to govern rests on the same foundation on which every other obligation rests—the claims of the highest good, the supreme law of the moral world. It is his duty and right to govern who can do it best. He is the right ruler whose services, in that capacity, the highest interest of all demands.

—The Rev. John M. Williams, in Bibliotheca Sacra.


Women in Politics

Women in Politics (The Revolution, 1868)

Such is the heading of an important article in the New York News. The suggestions made are too important to be overlooked. Coming from the very highest democratic authority, we may in reproducing some of them wake again republican wrath, as did Miss Anthony when she invaded the late Democratic Convention with her memorial for Woman’s Suffrage, without out first asking republican permission. But as we have decided not to make the republican party any longer the custodian of our cause, we shall here give our readers another sample of democratic reasoning on the subject, asking the republicans to match it, as they challenged so dramatically of their nominee at Chicago. The News says in opening:

The appearance of a female delegate in a national party Convention, such as that of Miss Anthony in the late Convention held in this city, marks an era in the woman’s rights movement. The acceptance and reading of her address is the first sign, of recognition, in a political sense, that woman has received from any of the great parties of the day. No doubt she will feel encouraged to urge on the enterprise she has undertaken. It is too late to cry down the female suffrage movement with contempt. Opponents of the proposed innovation in our political system must prepare themselves to grapple with a substantial foe.

Already the advocates of female suffrage have made an impression in England. Among those who favor the idea are such powerful and practical statesmen as John Bright and John Stuart Mill; and the strength its friends exhibited in the British Parliament astonished the keenest observers of the times. In our own country the strong-minded females have organized into a league, started a lively newspaper organ, instituted a series of public meetings, and enlisted the services of popular speakers, like George Wm. Curtis, James M. Scoville of New Jersey, and George Francis Train. In the recent elections in the State of Kansas the advocates of female suffrage were able to carry over nine thousand of the voter of the sterner sex with them, which was, at least one-third of the whole vote polled.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Hayes-Lost

President Hayes: A Lost Opportunity

President Hayes has lost another opportunity of reminding the country of its injustice toward woman. Again a message has gone before Congress, and no mention made of the women citizens of the country.

The Chinese have a saying, that “even the gods cannot help those who lose an opportunity.”

Two years ago, a committee from the National Woman Suffrage convention was appointed to call upon President Hayes, and remind him that no women had been appointed as commissioners from this country to the Paris Exposition, while many of the departments the commissioners were to investigate could much more satisfactorily be reported upon by women—as laces, embroideries, &c. The president received this committee, of which the editor of the NATIONAL CITIZEN was one with due courtesy, even reading from among his private papers those duties of commissioners which he recognized as more likely to be satisfactorily performed by women. “But, ladies, you are too late,” said he. “You should have petitioned Congress a year ago; these appointments have been settled a long time.”

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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