Tag Archives: Woman Suffrage
Martha Gruening

Martha Gruening Aids Washington Suffrage Campaign

Smith College Girl Aids Washington Suffrage Campaign

(Seattle, Washington – August 1910) – Miss Martha Gruening, of New York, a young graduate of Smith College, is generously devoting her summer to the Washington campaign. On her own responsibility and on her own resources, this young woman came across the continent to render service in what she beileves will be a winning campaign, and brilliant service she has rendered.

For this young girl has a message—a message from the working girls of Philadelphia to the working men and women of Washington. This message briefly stated is this: If the men of Washington will give women the ballot, it will help the hard pressed working girls of the East to a better chance.

Miss Gruening brings her message straight from the working girls for she took part in the shirt waist strike in Philadelphia last winter. While in her proper person of college girl she was not molested, though she “picketed” for weeks, but when one day she put on an old gown and a striker’s badge she was arrested and put in a cell.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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20 Facts Suffrage

Twenty Facts About Woman Suffrage

This list appeared in the September 1911 issue of the Western Woman Voter, a newspaper published in Seattle, Washington.

Established to serve all women voters throughout the western U.S., Western Woman Voter began publication following the passage of suffrage in Washington State. Adella Parker, a popular Seattle lawyer and prominent suffragist, was the driving force behind both it and the suffrage movement. It also served as a print forum for Parker’s progressivist sympathies regarding political and social reform.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Married Men for War

Married Men for War (1917)

This item appeared in the July 1917 issue of The Remonstrance. The Remonstrance was the official publication of the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women. First published annually and later quarterly in Boston from February, 1890 until October, 1913, it provided a forum for women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women.

Married Men for War

Miss Rankin, the Montana Congresswoman, who gained a conspicuous place in the headlines by her sobbing vote against war, has her own ideas as to how war, when it must come, should be carried on.

The old principle is “Old men for counsel, young men for war.” Miss Rankin would reverse this. She would send the fathers of families to war, because they have already done their duty in domestic relations, but she would exempt “the young men who have not as yet selected their life-mates” and become fathers of children.

The effect of this plan upon military efficiency is something which Miss Rankin does not think it necessary to take into consideration. Nothing would contribute more surely to the triumph of the enemy than sending out armies of the aged and middle-aged to face the German armies. But that, again, does not matter to Miss Rankin.

The Lowell Courier-Citizen of April 28, is abundantly justified in its sharp comment:

Miss Rankin’s successive exhibitions do not tend to make us much more enthusiastic toward the prospect of a House and Senate made up, on the 50–50 basis, of anxious ladies and mediocre gentlemen. Superficial conversations would indicate that her career thus far has landed the suffrage cause the most decided wallop that it has sustained in a decade. We can do with very, very few of these feministic representatives, if the present sample is to be taken as indicating the general trend.

Source: The Remonstrance, July 1917

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

Anti-Suffragists America First and Always

Anti-Suffragists: America First and Always

The Remonstrance was the official publication of the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women. It provided a forum for women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women.

Scholarship has focused largely on the historical developments of the suffrage movement, with the presence of female opponents of suffrage and anti-suffragist organizations receiving less attention. These anti-suffragists were vocal in their opposition to the suffragists who represented a threat to their ideal of womanhood. While female suffragists largely ignored them at that time, it is important to acknowledge their presence in American history.

This unsigned essay painting the suffragists as disloyal and un-American appeared during the ramp up to American engagement in the first World War.

America First and Always

(The Remonstrance, July 1917) This is the motto of anti-suffragists. During the great struggle into which the United States has been forced, they will give the first place, in their thoughts and activities, to their country. In every possible way, through their own organizations, through the National League for Woman’s Service, through the Red Cross, through other organizations and individually, they will contribute unsparingly to the triumph of the national cause and the supplying of the national needs. The promises of service which they have made to the President of the United States, to the Governors of the several states and to municipal authorities will be kept, in spirit and in letter.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Consent of the Governed

Suffrage is Not a Natural Right

The Remonstrance was the official publication of the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women. First published annually and later quarterly in Boston from February, 1890 until October, 1913, it provided a forum for women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women.

Suffrage Not a Natural Right

(The Remonstrance, January 1894) It is further urged that discriminating against women at the polls is an implication of inferiority and an indignity to her sex. Not so is it generally regarded by women. The average woman deems her duties respectable, and about as onerous as she cares to assume, and feels no need of the honor the ballot would confer. Thirty years of faithful missionary labor have failed to make her realize that she is suffering for want of it.

Woman, it is further claimed, is a citizen having natural right to the ballot, and as all just government rests on the consent of the governed, it is unjust to deprive her of all share in choice of rulers and to exact obedience to laws in making which she has no part. This is absurd and atheistic. The right to govern does not rest upon the consent of the governed. The divine authority, to which all rightful human authority is subordinate, rests on no such basis. God never asked permission to reign. The right of the parent to govern does not rest on the consent of his children. Right to punish the criminal does not rest on his consent to be punished. Governments were ordained to govern, not to be governed. The right or duty to govern rests on the same foundation on which every other obligation rests—the claims of the highest good, the supreme law of the moral world. It is his duty and right to govern who can do it best. He is the right ruler whose services, in that capacity, the highest interest of all demands.

—The Rev. John M. Williams, in Bibliotheca Sacra.