Tag Archives: Women’s History
Average Woman

The Average American Woman (1878)

“Now is the time when the average American woman begins to negotiate for a handsome Christmas present for her husband —at some store where his credit is good.”— The Boone County (Iowa) Republican.

Exactly! It is the “average American woman” who tends the babies, washes, cooks, scrubs, washes dishes, irons, bakes and sews, and sits down in the evening tired and discouraged, to take up the weekly paper and read such cruel and insulting taunts and jeers, because in spite of her care and toil, she is unselfish enough to wish to give her husband a Christmas present.

It is the ‘average American woman” who takes ten cents worth of flour and converts it into thirty-five cents worth of bread.

Who earns the bread for the family, the husband who gives ten cents worth of labor, or the wife who gives twenty-five?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Hayes-Lost

President Hayes: A Lost Opportunity

President Hayes has lost another opportunity of reminding the country of its injustice toward woman. Again a message has gone before Congress, and no mention made of the women citizens of the country.

The Chinese have a saying, that “even the gods cannot help those who lose an opportunity.”

Two years ago, a committee from the National Woman Suffrage convention was appointed to call upon President Hayes, and remind him that no women had been appointed as commissioners from this country to the Paris Exposition, while many of the departments the commissioners were to investigate could much more satisfactorily be reported upon by women—as laces, embroideries, &c. The president received this committee, of which the editor of the NATIONAL CITIZEN was one with due courtesy, even reading from among his private papers those duties of commissioners which he recognized as more likely to be satisfactorily performed by women. “But, ladies, you are too late,” said he. “You should have petitioned Congress a year ago; these appointments have been settled a long time.”

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Howes Appeal

Julia Ward Howe’s Appeal to Womanhood

Again, in the sight of the Christian world, have the skill and power of two great nations exhausted themselves in mutual murder. Again have the sacred questions of international justice been committed to the fatal mediation of military weapons. In this day of progress, in this century of light, the ambition of rulers has been allowed to barter the dear interests of domestic life for the bloody exchanges of the battle-field. Thus men have done. Thus men will do. But women need no longer be made a party to proceedings which fill the globe with grief and horror. Despite the assumptions of physical force, the mother has a sacred and commanding word to say to the sons who owe their life to her suffering. That word should now be heard, and answered to as never before.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Shall they vote

Shall Our Women Vote? (1887)

By Rev. R.Z. Roberts

Whatever may be discussed through the columns of our great Church organ – the RECORDER – this is a question that all should consider. There are many spheres in life to which women have been admitted, in which she was expected to make a successful failure, but instead she has been a success. In school as a student or as a teacher; in the pulpit, at the bar, or issuing medicine to the sick and dying – in any of the above woman has won laurels for herself; and so far she has not failed to wield that sweet and refining influence over men. Yet it is thought that this influence would immediately be sacrificed should she go to the polls and cast her vote. Is it possible that the father, husband and brother become such savages at the polls that they would be entirely beyond the influence of mother, wife, sister or daughter? If so, voting has a low moral tendency. If in other spheres in life woman wields an untold influence, why not at the polls?

In any gathering where women are absent, there is a certain degree of monotony; and men themselves don’t exhibit the culture and refinement in the absence of women that they do when they are present. Men have no right to limit gifts or talents.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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Writing Desk

The Apple-Headed Young Man

Mrs. Stanton tells a capital story of a spruce, conceited-looking young man, with head the size of an apple, who approached her in the cars the morning after she had given one of her strong lectures. “I do not agree with your views, Madam,” said this small-headed youth, evidently thinking that his opposition would stop the wheels of progress, and change the whole current of reform.

We everywhere meet apple-headed young men—persons attempting to block advancement, whether material or spiritual. “I do not agree with you” murdered Lovejoy at Alton, imprisoned Garrison in Baltimore, burned Hess and Servetius at the stake, persecuted Luther, crucified our Lord. But, despite it all, reform goes on.

When Stephenson invented the locomotive it was bitterly opposed; scientific men declared it impracticable; men of wealth opposed it on the ground of its frightening the deer and other game; landlords objected on the ground of its taking away their custom. Amid the multitude of opponents; one man gravely saul, “And what, Mr. Stephenson, would be the consequences if your engine met a cow?” “It would be varry bod for the coo,” responded Mr. Stephenson in his broad Scotch dialect. And so it ever is.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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