Tag Archives: Women’s History
Martha Gruening

Martha Gruening Aids Washington Suffrage Campaign

Smith College Girl Aids Washington Suffrage Campaign

(Seattle, Washington – August 1910) – Miss Martha Gruening, of New York, a young graduate of Smith College, is generously devoting her summer to the Washington campaign. On her own responsibility and on her own resources, this young woman came across the continent to render service in what she beileves will be a winning campaign, and brilliant service she has rendered.

For this young girl has a message—a message from the working girls of Philadelphia to the working men and women of Washington. This message briefly stated is this: If the men of Washington will give women the ballot, it will help the hard pressed working girls of the East to a better chance.

Miss Gruening brings her message straight from the working girls for she took part in the shirt waist strike in Philadelphia last winter. While in her proper person of college girl she was not molested, though she “picketed” for weeks, but when one day she put on an old gown and a striker’s badge she was arrested and put in a cell.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Married Men for War

Married Men for War (1917)

This item appeared in the July 1917 issue of The Remonstrance. The Remonstrance was the official publication of the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women. First published annually and later quarterly in Boston from February, 1890 until October, 1913, it provided a forum for women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women.

Married Men for War

Miss Rankin, the Montana Congresswoman, who gained a conspicuous place in the headlines by her sobbing vote against war, has her own ideas as to how war, when it must come, should be carried on.

The old principle is “Old men for counsel, young men for war.” Miss Rankin would reverse this. She would send the fathers of families to war, because they have already done their duty in domestic relations, but she would exempt “the young men who have not as yet selected their life-mates” and become fathers of children.

The effect of this plan upon military efficiency is something which Miss Rankin does not think it necessary to take into consideration. Nothing would contribute more surely to the triumph of the enemy than sending out armies of the aged and middle-aged to face the German armies. But that, again, does not matter to Miss Rankin.

The Lowell Courier-Citizen of April 28, is abundantly justified in its sharp comment:

Miss Rankin’s successive exhibitions do not tend to make us much more enthusiastic toward the prospect of a House and Senate made up, on the 50–50 basis, of anxious ladies and mediocre gentlemen. Superficial conversations would indicate that her career thus far has landed the suffrage cause the most decided wallop that it has sustained in a decade. We can do with very, very few of these feministic representatives, if the present sample is to be taken as indicating the general trend.

Source: The Remonstrance, July 1917

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

Shall American Girls Become Servants

Shall American Girls Become Servants?

Where to obtain good servants, and how to furnish remunerative employment for the numerous class of women who must be self- supporting, are two great social problems of the day. And there are those who fancy that the solution of one of these problems necessarily involves the solution of the other. But such persons take only the most superficial view of both subjects. There is no lack of servants, such as they are; it is the need of good servants which is so severely felt. And to increase the quantity would not necessarily improve the quality, while it would result in a reduction of the wages of domestics, which, despite the cry of exorbitance, are already quite as low as they should be.

But I will first refer to the actual practicability of this scheme. In the contemplated general exodus of needy women from their garrets into the kitchens of the wealthy, the fact is overlooked that a large proportion of these women are widows with families to support, and are compelled, for the sake of these families, to keep a home about them, however poor that home may be. These will not desert their little ones for the good homes, high wages and wholesome food which our social economists know how to descibe in such glowing colors. And who can blame them, if they feel that it is better that all should starve together, than to have their little flock scattered hither and thither, dependent on the cold charities of a pitiless world?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Average Woman

The Average American Woman (1878)

“Now is the time when the average American woman begins to negotiate for a handsome Christmas present for her husband —at some store where his credit is good.”— The Boone County (Iowa) Republican.

Exactly! It is the “average American woman” who tends the babies, washes, cooks, scrubs, washes dishes, irons, bakes and sews, and sits down in the evening tired and discouraged, to take up the weekly paper and read such cruel and insulting taunts and jeers, because in spite of her care and toil, she is unselfish enough to wish to give her husband a Christmas present.

It is the ‘average American woman” who takes ten cents worth of flour and converts it into thirty-five cents worth of bread.

Who earns the bread for the family, the husband who gives ten cents worth of labor, or the wife who gives twenty-five?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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Hayes-Lost

President Hayes: A Lost Opportunity

President Hayes has lost another opportunity of reminding the country of its injustice toward woman. Again a message has gone before Congress, and no mention made of the women citizens of the country.

The Chinese have a saying, that “even the gods cannot help those who lose an opportunity.”

Two years ago, a committee from the National Woman Suffrage convention was appointed to call upon President Hayes, and remind him that no women had been appointed as commissioners from this country to the Paris Exposition, while many of the departments the commissioners were to investigate could much more satisfactorily be reported upon by women—as laces, embroideries, &c. The president received this committee, of which the editor of the NATIONAL CITIZEN was one with due courtesy, even reading from among his private papers those duties of commissioners which he recognized as more likely to be satisfactorily performed by women. “But, ladies, you are too late,” said he. “You should have petitioned Congress a year ago; these appointments have been settled a long time.”

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Newspapers Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily, The Revolution, and the National Citizen and Ballot Box.

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