classroom-teacher

Equal Pay for Equal Work in 1870

Extract of a private letter from a lady in Michigan:

I see in a late Revolution that it will expose the unfairness of half pay for equal work, on account of sex.

Here is only one example, out of many in my line of business.

On September 1, 1869, I took a man’s place in one of the city ward schools, the first time in this city that this position had been filled by a woman—have done the same work (except that of using corporal punishment, which, by the way, I abolished in my department five years ago, the Board here, a few weeks since); and giving better satisfaction, judging from “what they say,” than did my male predecessor, he receiving $60 per month, and I but $30.

The Board engaged me for the second term — proof of satisfaction. I have petitioned for better salary, pleaded for justice, and petitioned — but in vain.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

Source: The Revolution, March 24, 1870
Image:  Classroom scenes in Washington, D.C. public schools (1899)

All images included in blog posts are from either Accessible Archives collections or out of copyright public sources unless otherwise noted. Common sources include the Library of Congress, The Flickr Commons, Wikimedia Commons, and other public archives.

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