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NATIONALCITIZENANDBALLOTBOX-18800401

Woman Past and Present (1880)

From National Citizen and Ballot Box for April 1880:

CARLOTTA GUILLARD, was the first French woman who followed printing for a business. She carried on this trade from 1506 to 1567, a period of sixty years and was famous for the beauty and correctness of her work.

LAKSHMI BAEI, the Rani, or Queen of Jhansi, headed her troops in person in the war with England. She dressed as a cavalry officer, and her wonderful generalship held the whole British army in check, until she was killed upon the field of battle.

MADAME DE MAINTENON was the secret wife of Louis XIV. This king was for more than half a century, the central figure in Europe, but after his marriage to Mme. de Maintenon, who was much his senior, he fell entirely under her influence, a power she retained until his death, some thirty years later. Though of good family, she was born in prison and cradled in poverty. Her face was beautiful, her form exquisite, her manners captivating, and her tact great. For many years she controlled the destinies of France, ruling Church and State and Society, selecting generals and ministers, laying plans for the cabinet, directing church action, repressing court licentiousness, ruling France “vigorously and with an iron hand.” She lived to be eighty-four, keeping her faculties to the last. Love of power was the mainspring of her action; for its sake she lived a lie to the world as mistress of the king instead of wife.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Seder Services for Passover for Soldiers in World War I

(Gas Attack of The New York Division/March 23, 1918) Seder services on Passover eve and the evening following, will be conducted for the benefit of the Jewish soldiers of Camp Wadsworth, both in camp and in Spartanburg, on March 27th and 28th. Benjamin S. Gross and Robert Bandes, field representatives of the Jewish Board for Welfare Work in the Twenty-seventh Army Division, announce that arrangements are being made for the accommodation of every man of the Jewish faith who may desire to attend this religious ceremony.

The War Department has issued orders applying to all military and naval encampments by virtue of which all Jewish soldiers will be excused from duties for forty-two hours. The Jewish Board for Welfare Work through its camp representatives, and in co-operation with the Spartanburg community, will provide means for every one who desires to celebrate this important festival in the traditional manner. Announcement will be made at an early date of the places where the Seders will be conducted and a system of registration will be provided, so that the Board may be informed of the numbers who will attend.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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(Original Caption) Hoboken, NJ: Soldiers arriving in Hoboken, New Jersey. Undated photograph.

Watch Your Step When You Reach Debarking Port (1919)

(Coming Back/March 21, 1919) In fairness to the Army and yourself, be on the watch when you return to America. This sounds like the ordinary, or common garden variety of advice, made to order as you will, but there’s a heap more to it.

No soldier will ever forget the word “morale.” He’s heard about and read about it so much that he’s almost learned to understand it in all its devious paths. But morale means a lot when the soldier hits his home port and lack of morale has been playing hob with a good many gold-stripers from whom the public expected the ‘nth degree of expression of military discipline and intelligence.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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