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Amazing Line-Up of Women Voters (1919)

Whether or not the Federal Suffrage Amendment is ratified by a sufficient number of the States in time to permit the women of every State to vote in the next Presidential campaign, there will be 15,492,751 women eligible to vote in 1920. Leaders of women in this country are endeavoring to increase the number to 29,000,000, by securing the ratification of the Federal Amendment by thirty-six States within the next few month.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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The Man in the Auto (1907)

(Frank Leslies Weekly/July 25, 1907) The automobile has worked a great change in mining in the desert regions of the West. Formerly many mines could not be opened because of their distance from a base of supplies and the difficulty of hauling food by mule-power. Now the automobile is used both for passenger and freight purposes, and it is possible to reach in hours claims that were a little while ago days away from the railroad. It is possible in level districts to make a mile a minute over the sandy wastes, for no speed laws hamper the mining men. It is reported, however, that the friction on the hot sand occasionally melts the cement of the tires.

COMPLAINT is made by some automobilists (chiefly the speed enthusiasts) that the oiled or tarred road, by reason of its dark color, is difficult to follow after nightfall, whereas the light surface of the clay or macadam road is comparatively plain to view, even on rather a dark night. The average automobilist, however, using good lights and maintaining a reasonable speed, should have no great trouble from this cause.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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Are You a Red-blooded, Two-fisted HE-man? (1919)

Get a feel for life in the American Military camps of World War I in our America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers collection. This full page recruiting ad appeared in the July 25, 1919 issue of The Merritt Dispatch.

Are You a Red-blooded, Two-fisted HE-man? Look This Over!!

If you want immediate active service, the Mexican border is open to you. Men enlisting now are given special assignment to any organization now serving on the border.

The photographs shown here were taken during the recent pursuit of Villa’s army when they were driven out of Juarez by U. S. Troops.

Recruiting ad in the July 25, 1919 issue of The Merritt Dispatch.

Recruiting ad in the July 25, 1919 issue of The Merritt Dispatch.

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ManStealing-1852

Abuse of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850

Many cases like this appeared in newspapers run by African American and white abolitionists. Collected from local papers and correspondents, they were shared to keep attention on the abuses of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act. As long as this law was in place, free black Americans could be illegally kidnapped and taken south and sold without any evidence that they were previously enslaved.

This one appeared on the Frederick Douglass Paper on July 16, 1852.

KIDNAPPING. The Ironton Register details a case of kidnapping in Lawrence county. – A negro man, who had been for some time resident in that county, loaned some money to a white man, by name, Collier, who was to give a note for it, payable on demand; but, instead, a note was given payable in a year, including the interest. The negro could not read; but when he learned what the note was, called upon Collier for the money, which was refused.

A day or two after he sent for the negro to come and get his money. The next morning, Collier and two men, named Davis, were seen taking him bound towards the Ohio River. Collier soon after returned, and went to church with the negro’s clothes on!

The absence of the negro under the circumstances, excited the neighborhood, and Collier and the Davises were arrested and held to bail, jointly, in $300. It was soon after ascertained that the negro was in jail at Greenup, Kentucky. He had free papers, which were taken from him.

The accused were indicted but made their escape into Kentucky where they are at large. – Christian Free Press.

To learn more about this law and its tendency towards misuse, check out The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 Explained.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.

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A Strong-Minded Woman of a Gentlemanly Deportment (1870)

To say a man is strong-minded, in common parlance, is high praise. To say a woman is strong-minded, in the same dialect, is like saying she has a beard. It is a reproach. Now let us see what makes the difference.

Weakness abstractly is bad. It is always unsatisfactory, from weak tea to weak temper, and the epithet weak applied to great and valuable things in life, such as sense, will, temper, men, timbers, rails, and so on, indefinitely, is a sentence of condemnation; even to say she is a weak woman is not considered very complimentary.

Strength, on the contrary, is a good quality in itself; abstractly it is good. It is only in the wrong place that it becomes bad, and there are very few places in the world of matter or mind where it is unwelcome or necessarily unmanageable.

Take the material world. Iron is the best of metals, because the strongest for most purposes. The oak is the grandest of trees because of its strength. The strength of the hills in nature, the strength of construction of buttress, of tower and bridge, is the highest quality of each. All good things are better for strength. The stronger they are, the more valuable they are.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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