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Dastardly Outrage in the Dayton Race Riots (1841)

(The Colored American/February 27, 1941) Riots have got to be so common in our country, that we have become almost callous at the most daring acts of violence and disorder. We have in our two preceding numbers, informed our readers of the riot in Dayton, O., and had something to say upon the circumstances attending it.

The following slip we take from the Dayton Journal, from which it would appear that the press in the midst of disorder, dares to speak out in terms, indignant at such an outrage upon the colored people. It would appear further, that the lawless ruffians had taken the power into their own hands.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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Fire-OG

New York’s First Skyscraper Fire (1898)

THE FIRST OF OUR LOFTY BUILDINGS TO BE
SUBJECTED TO FLAMES

(Frank Leslies Weekly/December 22, 1898) No fire in years has attracted more attention in New York City and throughout the country than the one which occurred on December 5th, on Broadway and Warren Street, and destroyed a clothing store and damaged the Home Life Insurance building. The fire is not a notable one because of fatalities connected with it, nor because of the damage done, although that amounted, in round numbers, to a million dollars. This particular blaze will stand out in the history of modern conflagrations, because it was the first to put a so-called absolutely fire-proof building to the test. The “sky-scraper” has been “tried by fire,” and some problems which the fire department and insurance companies had been speculating about ever since the sky-scraper became a leading feature of the city’s architecture have been elucidated.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.

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FL1918-og

The Melting-Pot – News Roundup for November 1918

These short items were compiled for the Frank Leslies Weekly issue for November 23, 1918.

  • · American casualties in the war lately totaled 56,876, including 10,572 killed in action.
  • · In Berlin many women formerly wealthy and moving in high social circles are now compelled to earn their living as street-car conductors.
  • · Owing to a speech which he made at Rome on the immigration question, Milan labor leaders refused to meet Samuel Gompers, President of the American Federation of Labor, during his visit to Italy.
  • · A retired broker, a millionaire eighty-six years old, of Greenwich, Conn., recently married a twenty-five-year-old woman after a short courting. She lived with him only one day and then deserted him.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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L0034625 A young woman comes to visit a sick young man in hope that
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
http://wellcomeimages.org
Detail: A young woman comes to visit a sick man in the hope that her love will cure him, surrounded by relatives. Colour lithograph by LaFosse after P.E.Destouches.
The lettering ("L'amour médicin") may allude to Molière's play of that title first performed at Versailles for Louis XIV and his court on 15 September 1665, although the play describes a man curing a love-sick young woman, not the reverse as shown here
Lithograph
c.1850-79 By: Paul-Emile Destouchesafter: Jean-Baptiste Adolphe LafossePublished:  - 
Printed: c.1850-79

Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Catarrh by any Other Name: Influenza is Back (1790)

The influenza has again made its appearance in this city.

A medical correspondent has observed several mistakes in the accounts published in our papers, on the subject of this disease, and begs leave to lay before the public, for the benefit of his countrymen, the following short account of it, taken from notes of lectures delivered by Dr. Rush, the professor of the theory and practice of medicine in the college of Philadelphia, last winter.

The Doctor denied that the Influenza was produced by any sensible or unwholesome quality in the air; but allowed, that it was a good deal influenced, as to its violence and many of its symptoms, by the heat, cold, moisture, dryness and sudden vicissitudes of the weather. — He added, that it was not a new disease; that it had only acquired a new name; that it had been known in the early ages of physic by the name of the catarrhal fever , and had been described, very accurately, by Dr. Cullen, and other writers, by the name of Catarrh. It differs from what is commonly called a cold, in being produced wholly by contagion. The origin of this contagion is involved in as much obscurity as the origin of that of the measles and small-pox.

The Pennsylvania Gazette was one of the United States’ most prominent newspapers from 1728—before the time period of the American Revolution—until 1800. Published in Philadelphia from 1728 through 1800, The Pennsylvania Gazette is considered The New York Times of the 18th century.
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DomesticMisc-OG

Domestic Miscellany in Frank Leslies Weekly (1858)

Articles like this appeared in newspapers like Frank Leslies Weekly and brought little bits of information from around the world to their readers. This one ran on July 3, 1858.

An Angry Mistress – A French woman named Girault, who had formerly been the kept mistress of M. Galley, a French merchant of this city, entered his counting-room on the 12th May and suddenly stabbed him, as she thought, to the heart. Although it missed that particular part, the wound is mortal.

American Health – Are our ladies as capable of enduring hardships as their grandmothers? That is a very important question and demands a reply. Our present ladies turn up their noses at their grandsire’s wives, but it would be as well if they were trained up to milk their own cows, as in days of old, and then they would not have to mourn over their infant’s coffins, filled by that poisonous compound swill milk. As it is, they are born in hotels, live in hotels and die in hotels Hotels are excellent places to stay at on a visit, to entertain a friend, to study the travelling world, and to give one a keener relish for home, but are the graves of domestic virtue, happiness and health!

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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