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A Free Colored Boy in a New Orleans Slave Dungeon (1855)

This item appeared in the July 27, 1855, issue of the Frederick Douglass’ Paper published in Rochester, New York.

Isaac Roberts a free colored boy of Ohio is now confined in prison in New Orleans as a runaway slave. The boy formerly resided in Harveysburgh in the Southwestern part of the State. The following account of the proceedings of a meeting in that place for his release we find in the Wilmington Independent:

At a meeting of the Citizens of Harveysburgh and vicinity, held in said place on the 7th inst., for the purpose of effecting the release of Isaac Roberts, a free colored boy of Ohio, now imprisoned as a runaway slave in the City of New Orleans. Wm. Sabin presided, and Charles Hurd, was appointed secretary.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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The Education of Youth (1837)

The Education of Youth (1837)

(The Colored American for November 11, 1937) The time has come in which Education should occupy a larger place in the minds of colored Americans, than it has heretofore done. Our views have been too limited, in respect to its importance and its kind. Many have been wholly careless whether they availed themselves or not, of the advantages held out by the schools of our land, and others, who have felt the importance of the cultivation of themselves and children, have entertained very mistaken views respecting the course of study to be pursued – hence the deficiency of our schools, in number and in quality.

To read, write, an cypher, with a mere smattering of geography and grammar, have bounded our ambition, and limited our education. We have never sought after those sciences and arts, calculated to expand the mind, increases the ideas, govern the reasoning powers, and mature the judgment. The laws of mind and matter have been wholly unknown and neglected by us. If we have been busied in them both, our knowledge of them has been rather instinctive, than scientific.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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Consider the Navy

CONSIDER THE NAVY! (1921)

By Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.,
Assistant Secretary of the Navy

“There is another type of thought which is represented by dreamers who see in every new invention a subversion of all present conditions. In this class are the individuals who assert that the airplane has rendered obsolete and unnecessary either infantry or capital ships.”

Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., Assistant Secretary of the Navy

Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., Assistant Secretary of the Navy

The United States is a republic. Every citizen has an equal vested interest in its government. Therefore, every one of its public institutions belongs in the last analysis to the individual citizen. If an individual has an interest in any piece of property in ordinary everyday life, that individual keeps informed of the manner in which that property is handled. The same thing should hold true in so far as our governmental activities are concerned. Every citizen should take an active and intelligent interest therein. Certainly one of the most important of these is the navy, for the navy is the first line of defense of our country. When the test comes it is on our navy that we must largely depend to maintain our policies and ideals. All men and women should inform themselves in general concerning it. If they will do this they will be in a position to intelligently advise their representatives in Congress concerning their wishes. If they do not, many and grave errors may be made.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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OVCatto-OG

Ku-Klux in Philadelphia: Death of Octavius V. Catto

Octavius Valentine Catto (February 22, 1839 – October 10, 1871) was a black educator, intellectual, and civil rights activist in Philadelphia. He became principal of male students at the Institute for Colored Youth, where he had also been educated. Born free in Charleston, South Carolina, in a prominent mixed-race family, he moved north as a boy with his family. He became educated and served as a teacher. As a man, he also became known as a top cricket and baseball player in 19th-century Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Coverage of his murder appeared in the October 21, 1871 issue of The National Standard: A Women’s Suffrage and Temperance Journal

Ku-Klux in Philadelphia: Death of Octavius V. Catto

(The National Standard, October 21, 1871) The death of Octavius V. Catto, one of the victims of the disgraceful riot in Philadelphia on the 10th inst., (the day of the State election in Pennsylvania), is an illustration of the caste spirit not prevailing in our midst, as virulent, if not as potent, as the murderous hatred animating the Ku-Klux banditti of the South. In the city of the North, the classic birth-place of Independence, the city the home of so many philanthropies, and owning so many of the illustrious, the benevolent and loyal-hearted as her children, in open day, guiltless of any offence save that he was of a despised race, a colored man, there was assassinated a patriot, a scholar, a Christian gentleman, whose life, character, and rareness of ability would have adorned any race or time.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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NewOrleans1862

Reports from New Orleans (April 28, 1862)

(The Charleston Mercury) MOBILE, April 26, 1862  – A dispatch, just received from Jackson, Mississippi, says: ‘Thirteen of the enemy gunboats have anchored in the river opposite the city of New Orleans . A proposition made by the Confederates to evacuate the place is now pending. Various exciting rumors are afloat. The foregoing, however, is reliable. As telegraphic communication with New Orleans is closed, the above information must have been brought to Jackson by railroad.

Part I of our Civil War collection, A Newspaper Perspective, contains articles gleaned from over 2,500 issues of The New York Herald, The Charleston Mercury and the Richmond Enquirer, published between November 1, 1860 and April 15, 1865.
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