Anatomy of Protest in America

Anatomy of Protest in America delivers a unique opportunity to investigate through newspaper articles and editorials and books the people, places, events, organizations, and ideas, so important to Americans that they took action, exercised their rights, and stood up to protest.

Anatomy of Protest in America SeriesFrom colonial exploitation and revolution to slavery and abolition, to political rights and suffrage, and economic and industrial disturbances, this collection will guide the user through almost 225 years of American protest history in two convenient parts.

As debates rage over the future of America and the country’s relationship to its past, there is no better time to examine the wealth of content in Anatomy of Protest in America.

Part I: Newspapers – 1729-1922

This collection provides in-real-time reporting of an event, place, or person. These articles take the reader from the Boston Tea Party to Turner’s Rebellion to the New York City Draft Riots to Haymarket Strike to the anti-Communist demonstrations of the early 1920s.

Popular editorials from the person on the street, the rioter and protester, and the leaders’ points of view, professed goals, and personal opinions are presented for the reader to assess and understand the meaning and motivations of popular protest actions.

For example, the campaign to abolish slavery in the United States was one of the most powerful and effective social movements of the nineteenth century. Users mining the newspapers articles, stories, and editorials in Part I can trace how African American and white abolitionist voices grew louder with actions becoming more violent over time, culminating in John Brown’s Raid on Harper’s Ferry.

The abolition of slavery and the Civil War ushered in an era of increased tension in northern and southern cities. Users can read articles on the traumatic New York City Draft Riots in 1863, the New Orleans riot of 1866, the Chicago Riot of 1919, and more – race rioting was rampant from small towns to larger urban settings in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Part II: Books – 1701-1928

This collection offers both a historical overview and a framework for understanding protest and its movements in American history. Woven into the fabric of local and regional history, Part II provides an engaging narrative history on social, political, and economic movements and their actions.

This rich historical archive includes a significant breadth of coverage of the movements, leaders, and adversaries, while bringing to life the voices of protest and reaction to the issues of their day.

The influence of Populism — a powerful agrarian-based movement in the late nineteenth century — is one of many movements that can be traced through Part II. These remembrances and personal narratives provide the user with a unique opportunity to understand this important social movement. It also provides background on the causes, its leaders, its impulse to protest and the institutional response to protests on the local and regional level.

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The Browse and/or Search links below are for visitors on networks with institutional access to this collection. Individuals with personal subscriptions must login at accessible.com to access the Browse and Search features.

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