The AMAROC News: America’s Occupation of the Rhineland, 1919-1923

The AMAROC News

The AMAROC News

Accessible Archives’ open access publication of The AMAROC News provides a unique opportunity to investigate post-World War I Americans in Germany and enhances the research experience for students and faculty studying the social and military history of America at the beginning of the Jazz Age.

The AMAROC News was a daily American military newspaper that appeared in Coblenz from 1919 through 1923. The name of the newspaper is made up of the initials of the AMerican ARmy of OCcupation and is synonymous with the American occupation troops in the Rhineland after the World War I. The newspaper reached a  circulation of up to 60,000 daily editions and was read by American soldiers and to a lesser extent by the civilian population, throughout the Rhineland occupation zone. For almost four years the newspaper brought American journalism to Germany.

The AMAROC News was a highly colorful newspaper that provided its primary audience – the American doughboy — a source of information for the soldiers to inform them about events both within the zone and on a global political level. Trained reporters were employed and cooperated with various German, French and American newspapers.  It should be noted that the AMAROC News was not the official voice of the American military leadership but worked independently.
The AMAROC News

The AMAROC News

In addition, to daily news reports and articles, the newspaper published letters to the editor, short stories, and poems regarding American-German social relations, and expressed the concerns of soldiers that were plagued by homesickness and a lack of understanding for their stay in Germany, even though the war was over.

Sports news took up a large part of the newspaper. Tips on how the soldiers spent their free time, such as excursions in the surrounding area on the Rhine and Moselle, entertainment offered by the YMCA, as well as advertisements for local Coblenz shops are highlighted. The daily comic strips were new for the Coblenz readership.

At the same time, the local German population was also able to place advertisements — several times a month there were special pages advertising local German shops and dealers. Articles and published letters to the editor relating to German-American relations were also included from German newspapers.

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