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White Paper: Medical Care in 19th Century America

At the turn of nineteenth century America, debilitating illness and death were as common for children and young adults as for elders with life expectancy hovering between 30-40 years of age. Now-curable diseases represented serious threats if left untreated. Accidents occurred frequently and treatment options limited considering that bandages were unsterile rags or old clothes.

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Inside the Archives

Inside the Archives – Winter 2021 – Volume X Number 1

Saying Happy Healthy New Year has most definitely taken on a new meaning – hoping that 2021 will be a kinder gentler year!  We remain supportive to your efforts and try to stay relevant with our new content and helping you to manage your existing content.  We are all working from home offices, so we are here for you whenever you reach out!

In this Issue

  • Learning from the Past: History of the Smallpox Vaccine in America
  • New product – Anatomy of Protests in America Series
  • American County Histories
  • Counter Compliance Stamp of Approval

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Womans Trib - Emma

More Women’s History: The Woman’s Tribune, 1883-1909

The Woman’s Tribune, with its motto in the masthead: “Equality Before The Law,” was launched by Clara Bewick Colby from her home in Beatrice, Nebraska in August 1883. The Woman’s Tribune and Colby as publisher – also editor, typesetter, and correspondent — would become one of America’s most outspoken proponents of Women’s Suffrage and political rights.

Clara Bewick Colby

Clara Bewick Colby

The Woman’s Tribune’s audience included many of the leading activists within the Women’s Suffrage movement, as well as potential suffragist converts among women in the trans-Mississippi West. Colby worked hard to establish the newspaper’s philosophical identity at a time when the Suffrage Movement was characterized by opposing, often vitriolic, factions.

Susan B. Anthony, on more than one occasion, considered The Woman’s Tribune as the organ of the National Woman Suffrage Association, even though the Tribune was never formally affiliated with any national group.

As the second-longest-running woman suffrage newspaper, it was significant for several reasons –

  • Unlike many other Suffrage newspapers, the Tribune was designed as a general circulation newspaper.
  • Colby believed that her newspaper should connect suffrage to other issues of importance and interest to women, particularly to the rural women of the Midwest and West.
  • Political and international issues were presented in the newspaper – Colby was the first officially-recognized woman war correspondent representing a woman’s newspaper during the Spanish-American War.
  • The Tribune was probably the first woman’s paper fully published by a woman.
  • Highly regarded by Suffrage Movement leaders. Elizabeth Cady Stanton considered it “the best suffrage paper ever published” and allowed it to serialize two of her most important works, her autobiography and The Woman’s Bible.

This collection comprises the complete run of all 724 issues subdivided into five parts by date range:

  • The Woman’s Tribune, Part I: 1883-1887
  • The Woman’s Tribune, Part II: 1888-1892
  • The Woman’s Tribune, Part III: 1893-1897
  • The Woman’s Tribune, Part IV: 1898-1902
  • The Woman’s Tribune, Part V: 1903-1909

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