Tag Archives: 19th century
og-dayton-race-riots

Dastardly Outrage in the Dayton Race Riots (1841)

(The Colored American/February 27, 1941) Riots have got to be so common in our country, that we have become almost callous at the most daring acts of violence and disorder. We have in our two preceding numbers, informed our readers of the riot in Dayton, O., and had something to say upon the circumstances attending it.

The following slip we take from the Dayton Journal, from which it would appear that the press in the midst of disorder, dares to speak out in terms, indignant at such an outrage upon the colored people. It would appear further, that the lawless ruffians had taken the power into their own hands.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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New York’s First Skyscraper Fire (1898)

THE FIRST OF OUR LOFTY BUILDINGS TO BE
SUBJECTED TO FLAMES

(Frank Leslies Weekly/December 22, 1898) No fire in years has attracted more attention in New York City and throughout the country than the one which occurred on December 5th, on Broadway and Warren Street, and destroyed a clothing store and damaged the Home Life Insurance building. The fire is not a notable one because of fatalities connected with it, nor because of the damage done, although that amounted, in round numbers, to a million dollars. This particular blaze will stand out in the history of modern conflagrations, because it was the first to put a so-called absolutely fire-proof building to the test. The “sky-scraper” has been “tried by fire,” and some problems which the fire department and insurance companies had been speculating about ever since the sky-scraper became a leading feature of the city’s architecture have been elucidated.

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.

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Domestic Miscellany in Frank Leslies Weekly (1858)

Articles like this appeared in newspapers like Frank Leslies Weekly and brought little bits of information from around the world to their readers. This one ran on July 3, 1858.

An Angry Mistress – A French woman named Girault, who had formerly been the kept mistress of M. Galley, a French merchant of this city, entered his counting-room on the 12th May and suddenly stabbed him, as she thought, to the heart. Although it missed that particular part, the wound is mortal.

American Health – Are our ladies as capable of enduring hardships as their grandmothers? That is a very important question and demands a reply. Our present ladies turn up their noses at their grandsire’s wives, but it would be as well if they were trained up to milk their own cows, as in days of old, and then they would not have to mourn over their infant’s coffins, filled by that poisonous compound swill milk. As it is, they are born in hotels, live in hotels and die in hotels Hotels are excellent places to stay at on a visit, to entertain a friend, to study the travelling world, and to give one a keener relish for home, but are the graves of domestic virtue, happiness and health!

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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christmas-party

Hints Upon the Doings of the Fashionable World (December 1882)

(Godey’s Lady’s Book) At this season of the year children’s parties are probably more fashionable than at any other time in the whole year. Many little ones who are busy at other seasons with their school duties now have holiday, and it is their parents’ and guardians’ wish to try and give them pleasure.

There is such a variety of parties given that it is difficult to know where to begin a description; but we will try and give our readers who desire to contribute to their children’s pleasure some hints upon how they may do it.

One of the first things to be considered is the number of guests to be invited, and to try to have them as near of an age as possible; for what will please young children will not gratify their older brothers and sisters, and younger ones do not appreciate what older ones enjoy.

Godey’s Lady’s Book— Louis Antoine Godey began publishing Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830. He designed his monthly magazine specifically to attract the growing audience of literate American women. The magazine was intended to entertain, inform, and educate the women of America.

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Thoughts on Dress by Rev. Daniel Cooper (1865)

(The Christian Recorder/December 2, 1865) Mr. Editor, it is apparent that whatever a man delights in most, that he will seek after. Our Saviour said, “Wheresoever the carcass is, there will the eagles be gathered together.”

What is sought after more than fashionable dress? Like the Athenians who spent all their time either to hear or tell something new. Sir, is it not a fact that the masses both of the church and world are now spending their time as to who shall excel in some new style or fashion of dress?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
(more…)


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