Tag Archives: African American Newspapers
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Thoughts on Dress by Rev. Daniel Cooper (1865)

(The Christian Recorder/December 2, 1865) Mr. Editor, it is apparent that whatever a man delights in most, that he will seek after. Our Saviour said, “Wheresoever the carcass is, there will the eagles be gathered together.”

What is sought after more than fashionable dress? Like the Athenians who spent all their time either to hear or tell something new. Sir, is it not a fact that the masses both of the church and world are now spending their time as to who shall excel in some new style or fashion of dress?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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The Sagacity of Dogs (1857)

(Provincial Freeman – January 31, 1857) Among the many curious, yet well authenticated anecdotes, illustrating the wonderful sagacity of reasoning powers of the canine race, the following deserves a place:

A large New Foundland dog belonged to the captain of a ship engaged in the trade between Nova Scotia and Greenock. On one occasion, the captain brought from Halifax a beautiful, cat which formed a particular acquaintance with Rover; and these two animals of such different natures were almost inseparable during the passage.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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General Jesup: Treachery – Vile and Unblushing (1838)

(The Colored American/February 3, 1838) The conduct of General Jesup (see note) in decoying the Indians within his power by means of “the flag of truce,” and then sending them to a dungeon, is in the highest degree abominable. It must and certainly will bring down the indignation of heaven. It is not enough that the solemn treaties made with the poor red man, by which their lands were guaranteed, are ruthlessly violated, and the Indians, by the white man’s rapacity, driven far away from the graves of their fathers.

But now TREACHERY is added to COVENANT BREAKING. The doctrine that MIGHT MAKES RIGHT is practiced again. What a miserable wretch this called General Jesup must be, deliberately to plan such treachery upon the poor unsuspecting Indian.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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American Slavery in 1848: An Evil with no Redeeming Features

This appeared in Frederick Douglass’s North Star on December 1, 1848. It was a reprint of an editorial from the Free Soil Standard.

This institution of slavery is an evil which has not a single redeeming feature. In most cases, whatever is lost by one set of men is gained by another; but in this instance, it is not so, for the slaveholders and the slaves are alike injured. The latter, in consequence of being almost deprived of education, and kept in continued subjugation, are reduced almost to the condition of brutes; while the former, by being placed beyond the necessity of labor, lead lives of habitual indolence, and pervert those faculties which were given to them for the noblest purposes.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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A Free Colored Boy in a New Orleans Slave Dungeon (1855)

This item appeared in the July 27, 1855, issue of the Frederick Douglass’ Paper published in Rochester, New York.

Isaac Roberts a free colored boy of Ohio is now confined in prison in New Orleans as a runaway slave. The boy formerly resided in Harveysburgh in the Southwestern part of the State. The following account of the proceedings of a meeting in that place for his release we find in the Wilmington Independent:

At a meeting of the Citizens of Harveysburgh and vicinity, held in said place on the 7th inst., for the purpose of effecting the release of Isaac Roberts, a free colored boy of Ohio, now imprisoned as a runaway slave in the City of New Orleans. Wm. Sabin presided, and Charles Hurd, was appointed secretary.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
(more…)


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