Tag Archives: African American Newspapers
Pews

The 1850 National Woman’s Rights Convention and People of Color

The first National Women’s Rights Convention began on October 23, 1850, in Worcester, Massachusetts in the USA.

The National Women’s Rights Convention became an annual series of meetings that increased the visibility of the early women’s rights movement in the United States.

Parker Pillsbury

Parker Pillsbury

The National Women’s Rights Convention combined both male and female leadership, and attracted a wide base of support including temperance advocates and abolitionists. Speeches were given on the subjects of equal wages, expanded education and career opportunities, women’s property rights, marriage reform, abolition, racial equality, and temperance.

Chief among the concerns discussed at the convention was the passage of laws that would give suffrage to women.

A letter in a Pittsburgh newspaper criticized the convention for statements made for the record to include people of color in the demands for equality.

This is Parker Pillsbury’s response to that criticism. It appeared in the December 5, 1850 issue of Frederick Douglass’s newspaper, The North Star. This paper can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspaper Collection.

Parker Pillsbury (1809-1898) was an American minister and advocate for abolition and women’s rights.


DEAR MRS. SWISSHELM: – In the last Visitor, you say of a resolution relating to people of color, offered by Mr. Wendell Phillips in the late Convention of Women, at Worcester, Mass.

“We are pretty nearly out of patience with the dogged perseverance with which so many of our Reformers persist in their attempt to do everything at once.”

And again:

“In a Women’s Rights Convention , the question of color had no right to a hearing.”

It seemed as though the usually kindly spirit and good judgment of the Visiter were a little wanting in these two utterances. I should not have noticed it at all in most of the public journals – indeed, I neither know nor care what but few of them do say; for I should no more think of having them in my house, political or religious, than I would of inoculating the family with the foulest leprosy that ever unjointed the bones of a son of Abraham. But your Visiter finds a ready entrance and cheerful greeting so that we are a little solicitous about its bearing towards the few other … we have invited.

“Dogged and perseverance ” are two ugly words standing together, and Mr. Phillips has ever been very watchful to prevent any other topic from creeping to whatever platform he occupied, devoted to any particular reform. And those two words look strange indeed to some of us, standing in connection with his name and the resolutions to which you have taken exception.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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tj-letter

The Ordinance of 1787 and Jefferson’s Last Letter

In the admirable speech of Mr. Tappan, of New Hampshire, delivered on the 29th of July, we find the following brief history of the Anti-Slavery Ordinance of 1787, accompanied by a letter from Mr. Thomas Jefferson, never before published, which was written only about six weeks before his death. The history of the Ordinance has frequently appeared in the Era, but its importance, particularly in the present crisis, requires that it should be accessible to every person.

We regret that we are unable at present to make further extracts from the excellent speech of Mr. Tappan. Like that of his colleague, Mr. Cragin, it abounds in historical vindications of the Republican platform, and show, beyond controversy, that our party and candidate are the true representatives of the Whigs and Republicans of the Revolution; while the present sham Democracy have abandoned all liberal principles, and adopted the maxims of Austro-Russian despotism.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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LiquorOG

A Warning to Drinkers of Intoxicating Liquors (1854)

These warnings about contaminated alcohol appeared in the May 6, 1854 issue of the Provincial Freeman.

The Provincial Freeman was devoted to Anti-Slavery, Temperance, and General Literature, and was affiliated with no particular Political Party. Its prospectus stated, “it will open its columns to the views of men of different political opinions, reserving the right, as an independent Journal, of full expression on all questions or projects affecting the people in a political way; and reserving, also, the right to express emphatic condemnation of all projects, having for their object in a great or remote degree, the subversion of the principles of the British Constitution, or of British rule in the Provinces.”

To be Meditated upon by Drinkers of Intoxicating Liquors

ADULTERATION OF ALE – If any additional arguments were needed why people ought to abstain from ale and porter surely a sufficient reason would be found in the drugs with which the liquors are so adulterated. In the essay on Brewing, published in the Library of Useful Knowledge, we find, that in the manufacture of beer, sugar, molasses, honey and liquorice, are used for malt. Broom, opium, gentian, quassia, aloes, marsh, trefoil, coculus indicus, tobacco, nux vomica, are used for hops, and the last mentioned are known to be highly poisonous. Saltpetre, common salt, mixed with flour, jalap, the fiery liquid called spirit of maranta, bruised green copperas, live eggshells, hartshorn shaving, nutgalls, potash, and soda, are used to prevent acidity. Coriander seeds, carraways, orange peel, long pepper, casisum, grains of paradise, have been employed for flavour. Coculus indicus, bitter bean, nux vomica, and opium, which are strong poisons, are used for the purpose of producing intoxication. Here the reader will perceive how avarice has studied to enrich itself at the expense of the health, and lives, and morals of the people. – English Publication.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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The Present – An Age of Hope (1837)

Hope is made up of two ingredients, desire and expectation. Hope for a special object, is a desire for that object, in full expectation of obtaining it, accompanied with prominent reasons why.

Desire for an object, without expecting to obtain it is not hope, and to expect an object with no desire for it, is also, not hope; but both united is real hope.

Such hope, produces corresponding action, and influences to such steps as will secure the end hoped for. It leads the mind, wisely, to adopt those measures, which are most appropriate to accomplish the end in view; in a word, it makes the subject a consistent one. The present age of time, may be considered verily, one of hope; for wherever we turn our eyes, we see men of all classes buoyant with hope. The mechanic, and the artisan, each hoping to excel; the merchant and the commercial man sustained principally by hope, in their enterprises; and in the great political contest, and amidst the rage of speculation, the one, hoping for political honor, and the other, that fortune may attend his emergencies. But with no class of citizens is the above more emphatically true, than with colored Americans.

We have everything to hope and nothing to fear. It is impossible, that our condition in this land of republicanism, and in this age of reform, can be worse than it has been; we must, therefore, be on the verge of a better condition. – It is one of hope.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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What has the North to do with Slavery_

What has the North to do with Slavery? (1838)

This an abridged version of an article titled “What has the North to do with Slavery?” that appeared in The Colored American in February, 1838. The Colored American, with Samuel E. Cornish as editor. The new motto was RIGHTEOUSNESS EXALTETH A NATION, and the paper was “...designed to be the organ of Colored Americans—to be looked on as their own, and devoted to their interests.

What has the North to do with Slavery?

How often is this question asked by citizens of the free states of this union? Alas, this question is not unfrequently asked, by the professed followers of the holy Jesus. Our heart bleeds within us, when we read of the cruel sufferings, the despair, the brutality and the hopeless miseries, to which millions of our brethren, made of the same blood and by the same God, are subjected in the Southern states of this Republic.

How would the ambassadors of Christ warn the people, and wrestle with God for deliverance from the crying sin?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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