Tag Archives: America in World War I
flu-dead-buried-1918

Flu Dead Buried in Full Army Uniforms (October 1918)

This article, Victims of Flu Buried in Full Army Uniforms, appeared in the October 29, 1918 issue of The Camp Sherman News, the camp news paper for Camp Sherman in Chillicothe, Ohio that was published by the Ohio State Journal for the World War I training camp.

Accessible Archive’s America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers collection offers a deeper look into the day to day lives of those in the US military during the first World War.

Victims of Flu Buried in Full Army Uniforms

Rigid Inspection Made at the Morgue Before Bodies Are Released.
Military Escort Provided to Accompany Remains to Place of Burial.

Dressed in new uniforms and placed in plain, but neat black and gray caskets , more than 1050 Camp Sherman soldiers, victims of the influenza epidemic, have been prepared for burial at Chillicothe morgues, under military supervision.

The utmost care has been taken by Captain Sigmond of the hospital and Captain. B. S. Neff, transportation officer to see that everything possible was done to give the men a proper military burial.

Captain Sigmond assisted by Lieutenant O. W. Rogers passed on the embalming of everybody before it could be accepted for shipment.

Captain Neff, assisted by Captains E. B. Howard, A. P. Martin and W. H. Davis, inspected the clothing and general appearance of the bodies and had charge of their proper transportation home. (more…)


VD-og

VD in World War I: Transfer Men Only Free From Disease

The armies of The First World War dealt with venereal disease in quite different ways:

  • The German army provided brothels for their soldiers. As is easily imagined, given the German military’s class structure of the time, the officers’ brothels were up-market and the ‘girls’ young and pretty, wearing, as observed a soldier in Remarque’s “All Quiet on the Western Front,” very lovely lingerie. By contrast the brothels for the common soldiers were decidedly down-market and the prostitutes were not likely to wear silk and lace.
  • Before The War France had decided to legalize prostitution and provided a licensing mechanism for brothels and regular medical examinations for registered prostitutes. The French army was generous in supplying condoms to their troops.
  • The British met the challenge of venereal disease prevention in their troops also by supplying condoms, and allowing their men access to French brothels. With the disruption and disorder of war there were many unregistered prostitutes in France, who might be identified as amateur, part-time, or casual sex workers.
  • The American army’s approach to venereal disease was quite different. In 1918, with the arrival of thousands of American troops in France, the premier of France, Georges Clemenceau, wrote to General John Pershing offering to establish ‘special houses’ for American soldiers. Pershing, passed the letter up the line to Secretary of War Newton Baker who is said to have exploded, “My God, if Wilson sees this he’ll stop the war.” Whether it was President Wilson’s Presbyterian rectitude or the American prudery of the time, or both, a special order was issued making commanding officers directly responsible for the sexual health of their troops.

. (via Medicine in the First World War)

Order Requires Surgeons to Make Strict Inspection of Those Leaving.
The Camp Sherman News (The Eighty-third Division News)

No man will be permitted to leave this cantonment for duty at another camp unless found by examination to be free from communicable diseases and free from acute venereal diseases.

No man with acute or chronic gonorrhea or acute syphilis will be permitted to leave this camp for overseas. Examinations will be carefully made by regimental surgeons immediately prior to departure; men to be stripped to the waist. Immediately after examinations, surgeons will furnish the commanding officer of the detachment a certificate giving the names of men and date of examination and stating that he has examined them and that at the time of the examination the men were, in his opinion, free from communicable diseases.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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Are You a Red-blooded, Two-fisted HE-man? (1919)

Get a feel for life in the American Military camps of World War I in our America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers collection. This full page recruiting ad appeared in the July 25, 1919 issue of The Merritt Dispatch.

Are You a Red-blooded, Two-fisted HE-man? Look This Over!!

If you want immediate active service, the Mexican border is open to you. Men enlisting now are given special assignment to any organization now serving on the border.

The photographs shown here were taken during the recent pursuit of Villa’s army when they were driven out of Juarez by U. S. Troops.

Recruiting ad in the July 25, 1919 issue of The Merritt Dispatch.

Recruiting ad in the July 25, 1919 issue of The Merritt Dispatch.

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ww1-flu-og

Won’t You Help Shun that “Spanish” Bug? (1918)

Surgeon General’s Office Tells How To Make the Influenza Germ Die of Loneliness

Washington, Oct. 11.—“What is Spanish influenza ?”

Army Medical Department officers on duty at the Surgeon General’s Office when asked this question the other day pointed out that the disease known as “Spanish Influenza ” is identical with influenza and that the prefix “Spanish” came to be used on the supposition that it had started in Spain this year.

The symptoms of influenza are, a severe headache, pains in the bones and muscles, especially in the back and legs; marked prostration; fever running as high as 104; sometimes nausea; also a seeming sore throat. There is a little running from the nose and eyes and some sneezing and coughing.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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WW1-xmas-hospital-ward

Xmas To Be Day Big In World War I U.S. Hospitals (1919)

Our collection of American Military Camp Newspapers provides users with unparalleled access to unique sources covering the experiences of American soldiers during the mobilization period in 1916, in the trenches in 1918 and through the occupation of Germany in 1919.


The Camp Knox News for December 13, 1919

The War Department authorizes publication of the following from the Office of the Surgeon General:

Christmas in army hospitals will be a happy day for sick and wounded patients. A special Christmas dinner will be served and there will be other evidence of good in the form of decorations of winter greens, and in a number of cases, there will be Christmas trees and special programs. Relatives and friends of the patients will not forget them in the matter of gifts. Every opportunity will be grasped in order to make the Christmas season this year as joyous and cheerful to the brave wounded men as it is possible to do. (more…)


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