Tag Archives: America in World War I
ww1-flu-og

Won’t You Help Shun that “Spanish” Bug? (1918)

Surgeon General’s Office Tells How To Make the Influenza Germ Die of Loneliness

Washington, Oct. 11.—“What is Spanish influenza ?”

Army Medical Department officers on duty at the Surgeon General’s Office when asked this question the other day pointed out that the disease known as “Spanish Influenza ” is identical with influenza and that the prefix “Spanish” came to be used on the supposition that it had started in Spain this year.

The symptoms of influenza are, a severe headache, pains in the bones and muscles, especially in the back and legs; marked prostration; fever running as high as 104; sometimes nausea; also a seeming sore throat. There is a little running from the nose and eyes and some sneezing and coughing.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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WW1-xmas-hospital-ward

Xmas To Be Day Big In World War I U.S. Hospitals (1919)

Our collection of American Military Camp Newspapers provides users with unparalleled access to unique sources covering the experiences of American soldiers during the mobilization period in 1916, in the trenches in 1918 and through the occupation of Germany in 1919.


The Camp Knox News for December 13, 1919

The War Department authorizes publication of the following from the Office of the Surgeon General:

Christmas in army hospitals will be a happy day for sick and wounded patients. A special Christmas dinner will be served and there will be other evidence of good in the form of decorations of winter greens, and in a number of cases, there will be Christmas trees and special programs. Relatives and friends of the patients will not forget them in the matter of gifts. Every opportunity will be grasped in order to make the Christmas season this year as joyous and cheerful to the brave wounded men as it is possible to do. (more…)


Soldiers take bayonet practice at Camp Bradley during World War I. From April 1918 to January 1919, soldiers studied manual arts and horology at Bradley. Optics were important to the war effort, and soldiers learned to grind and polish lenses. There was also great demand for automobile and tractor mechanics. (Photo courtesy Bradley University Special Collections)

Seven Branches of the “University In Khaki” Established (1919)

(The Camp Bragg News, September 11. 1919) Home stations have now been definitely selected, to which the Regular army divisions that served abroad are being returned for discharge of emergency enlisted men who desire it, recruitment and reorganization on peace basis. These home stations are:

  • First Division, Camp Taylor, near Louisville, Kentucky.
  • Second Division, Camp Travis, near San Antonio, Texas.
  • Third Division, Camp Pike, Little Rock, Arkansas.
  • Fourth Division, Camp Dodge, Des Moines, Iowa.
  • Fifth Division, Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Sixth Division, Camp Grant, Rockford, Illinois.
  • Seventh Division Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas.

By the last of October, the process of actual demobilization will be practically completed insofar as combatant troops are concerned. There will be many details of care and disposition of surplus property, completing permanent records, looking after the population of the hospitals, that will continue to require the time and attention of many officers and men. But the units of the mobile army which have been overseas will be busied with plans for the future.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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vauclaire-hospital-ward

American Women: What they have done to bring peace to the world

From time immemorial, the part of woman in war has been the hardest. It has been her lot to send her loved ones away as sacrifices on the altar of her country and to remain at home, torn by all the emotions that rend the spirit of mothers, wives and sweethearts. She has been forced in the ages past to await with fearful forebodings the news from the scenes of conflict; she has suffered the pangs of sudden bereavement, and has borne the consequent burdens in the future years.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

The success of any nation’s arms has been due largely to the fortitude of its women. What we of the present day know as morale and which is maintained by large organizations in and out of the army, was just as important a factor in the years that have gone as it is today. But then there were no well organized bodies to see to it that our soldiers were kept in good spirits and guided in the right paths. The burden of the task lay with the women of our country.

It was their bravery at the parting, their cheerfulness in adversity, their fortitude in bereavement, their happiness in victory which inspired men to do or die, and which has demonstrated that “they also serve who stand and wait.” The ancient Spartan mother said to her son when he left her to do battle for Sparta, “Return with your shield or on it.” Human nature has not changed a great deal in the last two thousand years, and although the mother of today does not say so in so many words to her son, when he goes forth to battle, “acquit yourself honorably or do not return home,” she teaches him from childhood the value of bravery and the wretchedness of the coward. (more…)


Camp Sherman News - April 10, 1919

A Report on the First Negro Signal Corps (1919)

Prior to this great war there had never been a negro in the signal or engineer branches of the army. When the matter of a colored division came up, there was some doubt as to the ability of the negro to qualify for the highly specialized branches of the service that go to make up an army division.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

(more…)


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