Tag Archives: America in World War I
orig_531147_8027

Seder Services for Passover for Soldiers in World War I

(Gas Attack of The New York Division/March 23, 1918) Seder services on Passover eve and the evening following, will be conducted for the benefit of the Jewish soldiers of Camp Wadsworth, both in camp and in Spartanburg, on March 27th and 28th. Benjamin S. Gross and Robert Bandes, field representatives of the Jewish Board for Welfare Work in the Twenty-seventh Army Division, announce that arrangements are being made for the accommodation of every man of the Jewish faith who may desire to attend this religious ceremony.

The War Department has issued orders applying to all military and naval encampments by virtue of which all Jewish soldiers will be excused from duties for forty-two hours. The Jewish Board for Welfare Work through its camp representatives, and in co-operation with the Spartanburg community, will provide means for every one who desires to celebrate this important festival in the traditional manner. Announcement will be made at an early date of the places where the Seders will be conducted and a system of registration will be provided, so that the Board may be informed of the numbers who will attend.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

(more…)


Christmas-1918-OG

Lots of Good Eats Distributed by Knights of Columbus (1918)

300 Pounds of Candy and 10 Barrels of Popcorn Were Presented to the Soldiers with Other Things – Secretaries Decorated Buildings for the Holidays—Men at Base Hospital Not Forgotten.

(The Camp Sherman News (The Eighty-third Division News)) Co-operating with the other organizations in Camp Sherman, the Knights of Columbus secretaries and chaplains did their part in trying to make Christmas as real and pleasant as possible for the boys. In all three buildings special services and programs were carried out to the religious and social satisfaction and enjoyment of the thousands of soldiers and their friends.

Beginning the day, 15 masses were celebrated in the various halls in the morning, each of the five priests in camp being permitted to offer the holy sacrifice three times. This is a privilege which all Catholic priests enjoy throughout the world on the feast of our Savior’s nativity. All the masses were largely attended, in spite of the fact that many Catholic boys were included in the 30 percent who enjoyed Christmas passes. Fully 1,000 men received the sacraments.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

(more…)


ww1-xmas-og

Colored Soldiers of 10th Training Battalion Enjoy Well-Planned Xmas Parties (1918)

(The Camp Sherman News, December 31, 1918) One of the best Christmas celebrations was that held under the auspices of the Tenth Battalion in “P” section. This is the only training battalion of colored men, under the war department’s new table of organization for the One Hundred and Fifty-eighth Depot Brigade. Major John H. McLeod, formerly commanding the Twelfth Battalion, is the new commanding officer of the Tenth. To the major much credit is due for the spirit of Christmas that was contagious throughout the battalion. When Lieutenant Lawrence A. Oxley, morale officer of the battalion, carried his Christmas plans to the commanding officer they were promptly OK.’d.

On Sunday morning, after getting a detail of 10 men and a truck from the brigade supply department, Lieutenant Oxley started at 10 o’clock on a seven-mile drive to the farm of John Lynch on the Cincinnati Pike, Arrived there, Mr. Lynch kindly offered any tree on his property. A beautiful cedar, 30 feet tall, was quickly selected and as quickly cut down. But right here is where the “jinx” comes into the story. After placing the three in the truck it was discovered that the truck was stuck hub deep in the field into which it had been driven. Not until 6:30 in the afternoon were they able, with the assistance of the near-by farmers, to extricate the truck and start back to camp.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

(more…)


Positive SSL