Tag Archives: American Military Camp Newspapers
CampKnoc-1919-12-13

World War I: “Xmas To Be Day Big In U. S. Hospitals”

(The Camp Knox News, December 13, 1919) The War Department authorizes publication of the following from the Office of the Surgeon General:

Christmas in army hospitals will be a happy day for sick and wounded patients. A special Christmas dinner will be served and there will be other evidence of good in the form of decorations of winter greens, and in a number of cases there will be Christmas trees and special programs. Relatives and friends of the patients will not forget them in the matter of gifts. Every opportunity will be grasped in order to make the Christmas season this year as joyous and cheerful to the brave wounded men as it is possible to do.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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ww1-air-and-eyes

The Eye and Aviation (1918)

By Capt Conrad Berens, M. C .

Experience has shown that the men who wrote the first blake for the examination of the Aviator were wise when they demanded that the flier’s eyes be free from disease and that he should have normal sight, color vision and the power to judge distance quickly and accurately. In many instances where a waiver was granted for some ocular defect, serious and even fatal accidents have occurred to those very individuals in whose favor the waivers were granted.

Fortunately for those of us who are trying to keep the eyes in condition for flying, the necessity for keen vision, normal color vision and the proper coordination of the ocular muscles in the judgment of distance, is well recognized by the fliers; particularly by the men who have been over the lines. Many of the best fliers say that the two most important things in getting the Huns it to see him first and to shoot straighter than he does. Naturally, the eye plays the master part in both of these acts, although knowing how and where to look is also a factor. However, even though you know how and where to look you will be at a great disadvantage if you can’t see as well as your antagonist does. There is some confusion in the average mind as to the meaning of farsight and as the farsighted man does not necessarily see well at a distance, it is better to to use the scientific term hypermetropia in speaking of this condition. At first little attention was paid to hypermetropia but it was soon realized that the men who were very hypermetropia were in many cases unsafe as pilots, due the weakening effect of altitude, upon the muscles of the eyes and therefore extremely hypermetropia men are disqualified.

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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Camp Bragg News

How the Doughboy Liked “Furrin” Travel

Your cosmopolitan doughboy who has shaken hands with the King of England, danced with the Princess of Roumania, learned the slang of a dozen nations and cocked a knowing eye at all the choicest sights of the Continent, may sound extremely sophisticated by cable, but wait until he strikes the United States and see what furrin travel has done for him! It has made him love, not Europe less, but home more, and he hardly tries to conceal his grand passion under a poker face, either. For he has been homesick and weary for months, and the Goddess of Liberty looks like an angel, and New York harbor like Heaven, to his fond eyes.

Spirit of the American Doughboy

Spirit of the American Doughboy

As a national asset, then, the soldier is perhaps our best citizen, and because the A. E. F. as a whole is rampantly enthusiastic about its homeland and her interests, America may look to her soldiers for real inspiration in citizenship. These are the men to put into our business life, as rapidly as they can be transplanted from army to civil jobs.

To make the transposition more simple and effective, the War Department through Col. Arthur Woods, Assistant to the Secretary of War, has set up the wheels of a giant machine, which is working night and day to co-operate with all employment agencies for the sake of the returned soldier who has no job. But more than that, this great employment system operates for the good of America. Col. Woods and his thousands of assisting committees believe in the doughboy and in his power of real achievement in the future national life of the United States.

Instead of seeing snakes and other reptiles, the bibulous tramp sees axes and wood saws.

Source: The Camp Bragg News – August 28, 1919

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

Camp Sherman News - Notes from Stage and Film

Camp Sherman News: Notes from Film & Stageland

On April 6, 1917 the United States formally declared war on Germany and entered World War I. Less than two months later, the nation was in a race to prepare the infrastructure and people to fight the war. In June of 1917, Chillicothe, Ohio, in south-central Ohio, underwent a transformation that was becoming a familiar scene around the country. The Army decided to build one of the large training cantonments it required to train and mobilize men for the war effort on the northern edge of Chillicothe. In a matter of only a few months during the summer of 1917, the bucolic serenity of the Chillicothe area was dramatically transformed when over two thousand buildings were erected on land that was coveted for farming and where prehistoric Indians constructed large ceremonial earthen mounds.

This sprawling military complex that quadrupled the population of Chillicothe would become known as Camp Sherman.

Source: Camp Sherman, Ohio’s WWI Soldier Factory

Camp Sherman News in our America and World War I:  American Military Camp Newspapers collection offers a closer look at the camp’s activities and the interests of those training there.

This piece of entertainment news ran in the camp newspaper on March 13, 1919.

NOTES FROM FILM AND STAGELAND

Gertrude Hoffman played Cleveland last week and, from the reports, we hope she heads in this direction soon. Read this:

Miss Hoffman works along simpler lines this season than in the past, but her act is, perhaps, more pleasing than it was a few seasons ago when she appeared with a wealth of scenery and a supporting company. A Spanish dance, against a background of orange and black, opens her turn; and her “Dance of the Allies” is a number which introduces the filmy draperies and uncovered limbs of yore. Then comes her imitations of Ann Pennington, Addie Foy, Fanny Brice and Bessie McCoy; and, finally, her “Trip to Coney Island rounds out her divertissement. It is all well done, especially the changes made in an open dressing room, with two feminine valets garbed a la Ziegfeld.

“Todd of the Times,” starring Frank Keenan, who plays the role of the city editor of a large newspaper, breaking up a political combine and obtaining the managing editor’s job. Character development, in the screwing of the courage to the sticking point, is well worked out by Mr. Keenan.

While on the subject of Broadway beauties it may not be amiss to record the fact that Kay, Laurel, who has decorated many an edition of Mister Ziegfeld’s Follies, has joined the filmers. She is making her debut in a leading role in the next Rex Beach picture, to be turned out by Goldwyn in the newly acquired Culver City studio relinquished by Triangle.

Miss Ethel Barrymore’s success in “The Off Chance” has been such that her sponsors have arranged for her the longest tour of her career. She will play all the way across the continent this spring, visiting the Pacific Coast for the first time since 1911, when she was seen there in “Alice-Sit-by-the-Fire.”

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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Pershing and the Y

General Pershing Addresses the “Y” Workers

The first issues of our World War I military camp newspapers have come online.  All of the issues are available as page images, but now fourteen issues are available as searchable text with the rest on the way!

This new collection addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era.  Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research and fresh interpretation of events about “The War to End All Wars”.

America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers provides users with unparalleled access to unique sources covering the experiences of American soldiers during the mobilization period in 1916, in the trenches in 1918 and through the occupation of Germany in 1919.

General Pershing addressed them on their duties as Welfare Workers.

Poster showing a portrait of General Pershing, with a quote from him in support of the United War Work Campaign.

Poster showing a portrait of General Pershing, with a quote from him in support of the United War Work Campaign.

On the afternoon of Wednesday the 29th of this month, the Secretaries of the Y.M.C.A. were courteously invited by General Pershing to meet him in the Reception Room of the Officer’s Club in Le Mans.

During the reception, General Pershing shook hands with the members of the organization and had a kindly word to say to every individua member. In a brief address, he expressed his warm appreciation of the services rendered by the Y. M. C. A. saying that he felt that without such an organization it would have been impossible for the A. E. F to have developed and maintained its present high morale.

He admitted that certain criticisms had been made against the Y.M.C.A. and that possibly some of these criticisms were wellfounded. Since no institution or organization is perfect, and humorously added that even such a perfect organization as the A.E.F. had not escaped criticism.

General Pershing added that he had mentioned these things not by way of criticism on his own part, but merely that we keep alive to all the possibilities before us and carry out the great obligations and duties resting upon us to prepare the men of the A. E. F. both for their duties here and for the duties that would devolve upon them when they returned to their homes.

Source: The Bulletin, February 5, 1919

Our collection, America and World War I: American Military Camp Newspapers, addresses a topic and period that continues to be of the widest interest and importance to scholars, students, and the general public – America in the World War I Era. Camp newspapers make important original source material—much of it written by soldiers for soldiers—readily available for research.

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