Tag Archives: Recipes
Plum Pudding

Plum Pudding and Other Recipes for Christmas

We give a number of receipts for puddings, pies, cakes, etc., that will be of great use to our lady friends during the Christmas holidays.

THE PHILOSOPHY OF PLUM PUDDINGS

In the making of plum puddings, the following results of the examination and comparison of eighteen receipts may be usefully studied and applied:

Average of Eighteen Receipts for Plum Pudding

Fine flour, half a pound; bread-crumbs, quarter of a pound; suet, three quarters of a pound; eggs (yolk and white), four; mixed dried fruit, one pound and a half; mixed liquid, a third of a pint.

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TG-OG-2

1887 Thanksgiving Recipes from Godey’s Lady’s Book

Thanksgiving Day, is a holiday celebrated in the United States on the fourth Thursday in November. It has officially been an annual tradition since 1863, when, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens,” to be celebrated on Thursday, November 26. As a federal and popular holiday in the U.S., Thanksgiving is one of the major holidays of the year in America.

On October 6, 1941, both houses of the U.S. Congress passed a joint resolution fixing the traditional last-Thursday date for the holiday beginning in 1942. However, in December of that year the Senate passed an amendment to the resolution that split the difference by requiring that Thanksgiving be observed annually on the fourth Thursday of November, which was sometimes the last Thursday and sometimes (less frequently) the next to last.

Thanksgiving Receipts

Oyster Soup
Put two quarts of oysters, liquor and all,in a pan, set them on the stove to heat, but do not let them boil, or come very near to it. Now drain all the liquor into the soup kettle, and put in a pint of water and two quarts of new milk, half a pound of butter,and a little whole allspice and pepper. Have the oysters all this time where they will keep warm, and then salt to taste, just as you are ready to serve the soup, and put into the boiled up soup before the oysters are added. Salt should always be the last thing put into any soup, stew, or fricassee where milk is used, or it is apt to curdle. Oysters should never be boiled, but only scalded; boiling makes them tough and shrinks them up.

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flemishcook

Cakes and Custards of the 1860s – Part Two

The holidays are in full swing and now is the time to plan menus and treats for our friends and families.  This is a two part collection of cake and custard recipes from the November 1861 issue of Godey’s Lady’s Book.

Throughout the Civil War, Godey’s Lady’s Book carefully maintained a policy of not discussing the war and acting as an island of normalcy for American women.

This collection of recipes appeared in an issue dedicated to spreading the idea of Thanksgiving as a national holiday.

These are the custard recipes.  The previous post has the cake recipes featured in the same article. (more…)


flemishcook

Cakes and Custards of the 1860s — Part One

The holidays are in full swing and now is the time to plan menus and treats for our friends and families.  This is a two part collection of cake and custard recipes from the November 1861 issue of Godey’s Lady’s Book.

Throughout the Civil War, Godey’s Lady’s Book carefully maintained a policy of not discussing the war and acting as an island of normalcy for American women.

This collection of recipes appeared in an issue dedicated to spreading the idea of Thanksgiving as a national holiday.

These are the cake recipes.  The next post will contain the custards featured in the same article. (more…)


Mingus-mill-interior1

Corn Meal Based Recipes from 1837

On March 4, 1837, Phillip A. Bell began publishing The Colored American, with Samuel E. Cornish as editor.

The new weekly newspaper’s motto was “RIGHTEOUSNESS EXALTETH A NATION,” and the paper was designed to be the organ of Colored Americans—to be looked on as their own, and devoted to their interests—through which they can make known their views to the public—can communicate with each other and their friends, and their friends with them; and to maintain their well-known sentiments on the subjects of Abolition and Colonization, viz.—emancipation without expatriation—the extirpation of prejudice—the enactment of equal laws, and a full and free investiture of their rights as men and citizens.

Like most African American newspapers of the 19th century, The Colored American contained a balanced mix of sermons, news from the slave states, abolitionist letters, and general interest items like the recipe collection shown here.

USEFUL RECEIPTS

The South has been long celebrated for its grateful corn bread, cakes, muffins and hominy. In consequence of an invitation in the Albany Cultivator, a young lady in Tennessee had kindly sent the following directions for making these domestic delicacies of the table.

Plain Corn Bread. – Six pints meal, one table-spoonful salt, four pints water; thoroughly mixed with the hand, and baked in oblong rolls about two inches thick. Use as much dough for each roll as can be conveniently shaped in the hand. Many persons use hot water; in winter it is certainly best. The bread is better to be made half an hour before it is baked. The oven must be tolerably hot when the dough is put in. All kinds of corn bread require a hotter oven and to be baked quicker than flour.

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