Tag Archives: The Christian Recorder
Maid_and_mistress_in_crinoline

Crinoline a Murderer (1863)

On a recent occasion, Dr. Lankester declared his belief that at least six deaths per month occur in London from burns through the wearing of crinoline, while deaths from machinery are also frequent. At another inquest he said that “deaths from wearing crinoline were now so common that many are never reported in the public journals. If every fatal crinoline accident were reported, the public would know of them, and then crinoline would soon be abandoned.”

The wife of an engineer, Mrs. M.A.B., was on a visit to a friend on Notting Hill when she met her death at the age of twenty-eight. She reached for something over the mantle-piece, and her skirt went into the fire.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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new-years-eve

Old Time New Year’s Customs (1901)

This appeared in The Christian Recorder on December 26, 1901.

“Setting Up” In Years Gone By. The Dutch And Their Calls

“Goin’ to sit up tonight?” “I reckon – yes, I reckon I will. Nothin’ in it, y’ know, but lots o’ fun and fresh cider.”

Such a conversation might have been heard in any rural region of the central west some forty years ago on any New Year’s eve. And the “setting up” was the one and only point in which New Year’s observances differed from those of Christmas. The Knickerbockers have so far impressed themselves upon American life that most of the present generation think “calls and congratulations” have always been the great feature of New Years.

Know then, innocent youth, that as late as fifty years ago “New Year’s calls” were an unknown institution in three-fourths of the United States. But in the border states, especially the southern sections of the states just north of the Ohio, the practice of “watching the old year out and the new year in” was the one thing peculiar to New Year’s. Wonderful tidings were to be seen at that hour. Cows fell upon their knees, fowls went through a sort of reverential performance, the wild animals lost their fear of man, and certain plants of a mysterious nature sprang up in the door-yard.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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A Slave Romance

“An Old Slave’s Romance”

After the Civil War, The Christian Recorder, like many other papers, included ads from formerly enslaved people hoping to be reunited with family members they had lost as slaves.  This account from 1890 details the reunion of two long-separated spouses.

REUNITED AT 80 WITH THE HUSBAND OF HER YOUTH

A colored woman, bent nearly double with eighty years and a heavy bundle, was seen to board the Cincinnati Mail line packet yesterday afternoon. Approaching the clerk of the boat she slowly untied a knot in the corner of her red bandanna handkerchief and produced enough cash to purchase a deck ticket for Cincinnati. The wrinkled and feeble old Negress is the heroine of a romance.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
(more…)


Shall they vote

Shall Our Women Vote? (1887)

By Rev. R.Z. Roberts

Whatever may be discussed through the columns of our great Church organ – the RECORDER – this is a question that all should consider. There are many spheres in life to which women have been admitted, in which she was expected to make a successful failure, but instead she has been a success. In school as a student or as a teacher; in the pulpit, at the bar, or issuing medicine to the sick and dying – in any of the above woman has won laurels for herself; and so far she has not failed to wield that sweet and refining influence over men. Yet it is thought that this influence would immediately be sacrificed should she go to the polls and cast her vote. Is it possible that the father, husband and brother become such savages at the polls that they would be entirely beyond the influence of mother, wife, sister or daughter? If so, voting has a low moral tendency. If in other spheres in life woman wields an untold influence, why not at the polls?

In any gathering where women are absent, there is a certain degree of monotony; and men themselves don’t exhibit the culture and refinement in the absence of women that they do when they are present. Men have no right to limit gifts or talents.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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christmas-bells

Christmas Customs

The first traces of Christmas observance found in ancient history are early in the second century, at least prior to A.D. 138. In some churches, the Epiphany and Christmas were celebrated as one festival.

In the fourth century, after an elaborate investigation, the 25th of December was agreed upon, and has ever since been observed throughout Christendom. There may be still more unbelievers, but the historical and astronomical evidence in favor of this day, amounts to almost a demonstration, if such language can ever be applied to that class of testimony.

We derive our Christmas customs more immediately from old England, where it was a religious, domestic and merry making festival, for every rank and every age.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
(more…)


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