Tag Archives: The Christian Recorder
LastCigar

Nicotine: The Heart Poison (1867)

The Christian Recorder embodied secular as well as religious material, and included good coverage of the black regiments together with the major incidents of the Civil War. The four-page weekly contained such departments as Religious Intelligence, Domestic News, General Items, Foreign News, Obituaries, Marriages, Notices and Advertisements. It also included the normal complement of prose and poetry found in the newspapers of the day.

The Last Cigar

(Philadelphia, December 14, 1867) One of the most eminent physicians of this city, and deservedly so, attributes the premature death of three of the most eminent divines of this country to the inveterate use of tobacco. The recent death of one of the great financial and political leaders in Paris has directed public attention to the subject. In reading the facts, let every man who smokes take notice.

M. Fould wrote to several people, inviting them to his estate, and giving some account of his late hunting experiences. The fable was set at six o’clock, but the dinner had scarcely begun when M. Fould was seized with a fit of shivering and complained of sudden pains in the arms and hands. At the entreaty of Madame Fould, he left the room, and went to bed, asking to be left alone saying that it was but a slight indisposition and he wanted to sleep. At half-past seven, Madame Fould went up to the room to see how he was, and receiving no reply to her question, thought he was in a deep sleep and withdrew. At nine o’clock she went again, and, receiving no answer from him, hastened to his bed, took his hand, and found he was dead. It is believed that he died immediately after he got into bed. The remains of M. Fould were interred in the Protestant cemetery, at Pero La Chaise, where the deceased had a family vault constructed.

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Please help me to find her – Reconnecting Families After Slavery

Information Wanted Ads: Reconnecting Families After Slavery

As late as July 31, 1902, there were still formerly enslaved Americans using national newspapers in hopes of somehow reconnecting with the families shattered by slave owners before the end of the Civil War nearly 40 years before. These are a tiny sample of the requests in The Christian Recorder.

I was thinking about writing more about this phenomenon in post-Civil War America, but I feel that the messages, and the people asking for help, made themselves very clear.

INFORMATION WANTED

February 4, 1865 – Of John Pierson, son of Hannah Pierson. When last seen by his mother he was about 12 years of age, and resided in Alexandria, Va., Fairfax county, from which place his mother was sold to New Orleans, La., by one Alexander Saxton. Nine long and dreary years have passed away since his mother has seen him. Through the reverses of this war she has made her way to New Bedford, Mass., where she now resides. Her name is now Hannah Cole. Any information concerning him or his grandmother, Sophia Pierson, will be thankfully received by his anxious mother.

February 18, 1865 – INFORMATION WANTED – Mrs. Harriet Mayo, of Detroit, Michigan, wishes to make inquiry of Joseph Mayo, Richard Mayo, Aaron Mayo, and Lucy Mayo. The last she heard of them they were in Petersburg, Virginia. She now thinks they are some where within the lines of the Union army. Any one knowing of their whereabouts will please address MRS. MATILDA ROBINSON, No. 88 Mullet St., Detroit, Mich. (more…)


Maid_and_mistress_in_crinoline

Crinoline a Murderer (1863)

On a recent occasion, Dr. Lankester declared his belief that at least six deaths per month occur in London from burns through the wearing of crinoline, while deaths from machinery are also frequent. At another inquest he said that “deaths from wearing crinoline were now so common that many are never reported in the public journals. If every fatal crinoline accident were reported, the public would know of them, and then crinoline would soon be abandoned.”

The wife of an engineer, Mrs. M.A.B., was on a visit to a friend on Notting Hill when she met her death at the age of twenty-eight. She reached for something over the mantle-piece, and her skirt went into the fire.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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new-years-eve

Old Time New Year’s Customs (1901)

This appeared in The Christian Recorder on December 26, 1901.

“Setting Up” In Years Gone By. The Dutch And Their Calls

“Goin’ to sit up tonight?” “I reckon – yes, I reckon I will. Nothin’ in it, y’ know, but lots o’ fun and fresh cider.”

Such a conversation might have been heard in any rural region of the central west some forty years ago on any New Year’s eve. And the “setting up” was the one and only point in which New Year’s observances differed from those of Christmas. The Knickerbockers have so far impressed themselves upon American life that most of the present generation think “calls and congratulations” have always been the great feature of New Years.

Know then, innocent youth, that as late as fifty years ago “New Year’s calls” were an unknown institution in three-fourths of the United States. But in the border states, especially the southern sections of the states just north of the Ohio, the practice of “watching the old year out and the new year in” was the one thing peculiar to New Year’s. Wonderful tidings were to be seen at that hour. Cows fell upon their knees, fowls went through a sort of reverential performance, the wild animals lost their fear of man, and certain plants of a mysterious nature sprang up in the door-yard.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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A Slave Romance

“An Old Slave’s Romance”

After the Civil War, The Christian Recorder, like many other papers, included ads from formerly enslaved people hoping to be reunited with family members they had lost as slaves.  This account from 1890 details the reunion of two long-separated spouses.

REUNITED AT 80 WITH THE HUSBAND OF HER YOUTH

A colored woman, bent nearly double with eighty years and a heavy bundle, was seen to board the Cincinnati Mail line packet yesterday afternoon. Approaching the clerk of the boat she slowly untied a knot in the corner of her red bandanna handkerchief and produced enough cash to purchase a deck ticket for Cincinnati. The wrinkled and feeble old Negress is the heroine of a romance.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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