Tag Archives: The Colored American
chackles

The Domestic Slave Trade (1837)

On January 7, 1837 Phillip A. Bell began to publish a weekly newspaper called Weekly Advocate. From the beginning, one of the major goals of this newspaper was to educate its subscribers, and much information appeared in a list format including: principal railroads, lengths of rivers, heights of principal mountains, principal colleges in the United States and the principal features of various countries of the nations of the earth.

Rev. CORNISH,

The following article is taken from a late number of the New York Sun, and the Editor anxiously asks, “CAN THIS BE TRUE?” as if he had never heard before of such inhuman conduct. We answer, “YES,” and we have FACTS in our possession, in relation to the traffic to American Citizens, which are ten-fold worse than the African slave trade itself. Let it be remembered, that all the particulars, in this case, come directly from the very scene of shear atrocities.

Shall we conceal, from motives of delicacy, the awful features of this nefarious traffic? But this is only one solitary instance, and yet we weep when we peruse it. O! how different would our cold and lukewarm brethren, feel and act on the subject, if they could only have brought up, vividly, before their imaginations, the several thousand free Citizens of these United States, who are now pining in hopeless captivity in this LAND OF FREEDOM!

Now here is a free MAN, born and brought up in one of the British Provinces of America, put in prison by some ruthless white ruffian; and unless he has some white witness at hand to prove his freedom, HE MUST BE SOLD INTO SLAVERY, to pay for the expenses of his arrest! Is not this acting on inhuman and worse than heathen principles? Shall it not be more tolerable for Sodom and Gomorrah, in the Judgment, than for slaveholding America? We caution colored seamen, especially, against going among those soul-searchers and man-stealers. When will that day arrive, that we shall be spared the painful necessity of calling the attention of the public, to such inhuman and disgraceful conduct, in a land of Bibles and Missionaries; and in a country, too, professedly the freest, most enlightened, and Christian, of any other on the face of our globe.

Yours, &c.

R.S.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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The Present – An Age of Hope (1837)

Hope is made up of two ingredients, desire and expectation. Hope for a special object, is a desire for that object, in full expectation of obtaining it, accompanied with prominent reasons why.

Desire for an object, without expecting to obtain it is not hope, and to expect an object with no desire for it, is also, not hope; but both united is real hope.

Such hope, produces corresponding action, and influences to such steps as will secure the end hoped for. It leads the mind, wisely, to adopt those measures, which are most appropriate to accomplish the end in view; in a word, it makes the subject a consistent one. The present age of time, may be considered verily, one of hope; for wherever we turn our eyes, we see men of all classes buoyant with hope. The mechanic, and the artisan, each hoping to excel; the merchant and the commercial man sustained principally by hope, in their enterprises; and in the great political contest, and amidst the rage of speculation, the one, hoping for political honor, and the other, that fortune may attend his emergencies. But with no class of citizens is the above more emphatically true, than with colored Americans.

We have everything to hope and nothing to fear. It is impossible, that our condition in this land of republicanism, and in this age of reform, can be worse than it has been; we must, therefore, be on the verge of a better condition. – It is one of hope.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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What has the North to do with Slavery_

What has the North to do with Slavery? (1838)

This an abridged version of an article titled “What has the North to do with Slavery?” that appeared in The Colored American in February, 1838. The Colored American, with Samuel E. Cornish as editor. The new motto was RIGHTEOUSNESS EXALTETH A NATION, and the paper was “...designed to be the organ of Colored Americans—to be looked on as their own, and devoted to their interests.

What has the North to do with Slavery?

How often is this question asked by citizens of the free states of this union? Alas, this question is not unfrequently asked, by the professed followers of the holy Jesus. Our heart bleeds within us, when we read of the cruel sufferings, the despair, the brutality and the hopeless miseries, to which millions of our brethren, made of the same blood and by the same God, are subjected in the Southern states of this Republic.

How would the ambassadors of Christ warn the people, and wrestle with God for deliverance from the crying sin?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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Sin of Slavery

The Church in Fault; The Sin of Slavery (1838)

The great sin of slavery and caste as they exist in this country, do more to neutralize the means of grace, and block up the way of salvation, than all other things combined. Slavery is THE SIN of the nation and caste, THE SIN of the Church; and if these sins need not to be prayed and wept over – if they need not to be repented of an removed, then may all sin be tolerated.

If it be not the business and duty of the ministers of Jesus Christ, to set themselves at work, to convince the world, and especially the Church of these sins, then have the ministers nothing to do in the church militant; the sooner they go home to heaven, the better.

If we were to judge from the silence on these subjects, of ministers in the northern sections of the church, and the practice of these evils by ministers in the southern sections, we should conclude that oppression, the most cruel and unreasonable oppression, was no crime. But, alas! we cannot judge ;by this fallible standard; God has in his word, and by his providence, told us to the contrary. Oppression is the antipode of Christian charity. No sin in the history of the church nor world, has so readily provoked the wrath, and brought down the vengeance of God upon the nations, as oppression. In all ages, Jehovah has seemed, without the semblance of pity, to pour out his judgments upon oppressors. And yet do the clergy of our land SLEEP over this sin!!!

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s African American Newspapers Collection. This enormous collection of African American newspapers contains a wealth of information about cultural life and history during the 1800s and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day.
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Ohio

The Barbaric Laws of Ohio in 1837

The ILLEGAL enactments of Ohio, are extremely oppressive to her colored population. – These LAWS were made by our Western Fathers, in the reign of wolves and bears.*  They are vestiges of backwoods barbarism, and never were intended for this enlightened day.

The first settlers passed them, merely to guard themselves against too great an ingress of worn-out slaves, set free from Kentucky and other slave states. They intended them, merely, as a protection, for the time being, that would be superseded by civilization and education. The axe and the hoe, before which the western forests have fled, should long since, have come in contact with all these unequal, unrighteous, and injurious laws.

The state legislature has been memorialized several times on the subject. The voice of the people has called, LOUDLY, for the repeal of the oppressive code, yet the members have stuck to it, with the same KIND of tenacity, that the Haytians do, to the usages of their fathers, in working their oxen by their horns. They have no other good reason. OUR FATHERS MADE THESE LAWS, and we must not BREAK THEM, is the VERY BEST apology, that possibly can be made, for their existence in this light and liberal age.

For the benefit of such of our readers, as are not acquainted with the disabilities to which our brethren in Ohio are subjected, we will mention a few of them. They exist, under a clause, of the old constitution of the state, in which colored men are denied a residence in the State, without bonds and freehold security, for good behaviour, and as an indemnity against their ever becoming a public charge. They are denied the right of suffrage, and of giving testimony against a white man, in any case, or any circumstances whatever. (more…)


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