Tag Archives: The Pennsylvania Gazette
L0034625 A young woman comes to visit a sick young man in hope that
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
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Detail: A young woman comes to visit a sick man in the hope that her love will cure him, surrounded by relatives. Colour lithograph by LaFosse after P.E.Destouches.
The lettering ("L'amour médicin") may allude to Molière's play of that title first performed at Versailles for Louis XIV and his court on 15 September 1665, although the play describes a man curing a love-sick young woman, not the reverse as shown here
Lithograph
c.1850-79 By: Paul-Emile Destouchesafter: Jean-Baptiste Adolphe LafossePublished:  - 
Printed: c.1850-79

Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Catarrh by any Other Name: Influenza is Back (1790)

The influenza has again made its appearance in this city.

A medical correspondent has observed several mistakes in the accounts published in our papers, on the subject of this disease, and begs leave to lay before the public, for the benefit of his countrymen, the following short account of it, taken from notes of lectures delivered by Dr. Rush, the professor of the theory and practice of medicine in the college of Philadelphia, last winter.

The Doctor denied that the Influenza was produced by any sensible or unwholesome quality in the air; but allowed, that it was a good deal influenced, as to its violence and many of its symptoms, by the heat, cold, moisture, dryness and sudden vicissitudes of the weather. — He added, that it was not a new disease; that it had only acquired a new name; that it had been known in the early ages of physic by the name of the catarrhal fever , and had been described, very accurately, by Dr. Cullen, and other writers, by the name of Catarrh. It differs from what is commonly called a cold, in being produced wholly by contagion. The origin of this contagion is involved in as much obscurity as the origin of that of the measles and small-pox.

The Pennsylvania Gazette was one of the United States’ most prominent newspapers from 1728—before the time period of the American Revolution—until 1800. Published in Philadelphia from 1728 through 1800, The Pennsylvania Gazette is considered The New York Times of the 18th century.
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Irish-Servants

Irish Indentured Servants in the Colonies

Until the late 18th century, indentured servitude was very common in British North America. It was often a way for poor Europeans to emigrate to the American colonies: they signed an indenture in return for a passage. After their indenture expired, the immigrants were free to work for themselves or another employer.

In some cases, the indenture was made with a ship’s master, who on-sold the indenture to an employer in the colonies. Most indentured servants worked as farm laborers or domestic servants, although some were apprenticed to craftsmen.

The terms of an indenture were not always enforced by American courts, although runaways were usually sought out and returned to their employer.

Most labor contracts made were in increments of five years with the opportunity to extend another five years. Many contracts also provided a free passage home after the dictated labor was completed. However, there were generally no policies and contracts regulating control over employers once the labor hours were completed, which led to frequent abuse and ill-treatment.

Our 18th Century newspaper collections include the Pennsylvania Gazette and the South Carolina Gazette. Both newspapers carried many advertisements for the sale of indenture contracts and the recovery of runaway servants.

Indentures for Sale

August 19, 1762: To be SOLD, AN Irish Woman Servant, who has three Years and three Months to serve. Enquire at the New Printing Office. (The Pennsylvania Gazette)

October 29, 1766: TO be disposed of, two Irish Servant Boys times, the one having Six, the other Seven Years to serve, and are suitable either for Town or Country Business. The above Servants Times are disposed of for no Fault, but only for want of Employment. For further Particulars, enquire of William Parr, Esq; or of the Subscriber, living at the Corner of Walnut and Third streets. (The Pennsylvania Gazette)

August 10, 1738: Just arrived from DUBLIN, In the Snow JOLLY BACCHUS, Peter Cullen, Commander: A PARCEL of likely ENGLISH and IRISH SERVANTS, Tradesmen, viz. Shoemakers, Taylors, Weavers, Black and White Smiths, Carpenters, Husband- men and sundry other Tradesmen: Also a Parcel of likely Servant Women, fit for either Town or Country Work; whose Times are to be disposed of, by THOMAS WALKER, Butcher, or SAMUEL WALKER, or JOHN BEAUMONT, or the said Master on Board the aid Snow, now lying off against Market-Street Wharffe, where all due Attendance will be given. Philadelphia, August 3, 1738. (The Pennsylvania Gazette)

May 25, 1734: To be Sold by Ribton Hutchinson on the Bay extraordinary good Butter in Firkins, Herrings, Cheese, Irish Potatoes, Mens and Womens Servants, Irish Linnens of several sorts, and good Barbados Rum in Hogsheads, Terces and Barrils. (The South Carolina Gazette)

May 13, 1766: To be sold, for no Fault, an Irish indented Servant Maid, who is an excellent Sempstress, and has upwards of four Years to serve., Enquire of CHARLES CROUCH. at his Printing-Office, in Elliott-street. (The South Carolina Gazette)

The Pennsylvania Gazette was one of the United States’ most prominent newspapers from 1728—before the time period of the American Revolution—until 1800. Published in Philadelphia from 1728 through 1800, The Pennsylvania Gazette is considered The New York Times of the 18th century.
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Jamaica1795_1

“Negro Generosity” in 1790 Jamaica

Jamaica, Feb. 5, 1790

The following are recent instances of negro generosity, notwithstanding we are too apt to consider them as mere stupid beasts of burden:

An estate under a heavy mortgage was sold from its owner, who soon after died, leaving a widow, a son, and two daughters in very distressed circumstances. The negroes (having been formerly well treated) had a meeting, and agreed to pay an annuity of half a bit a week, each, for the support of their old master’s family. Seeing the son, soon after, passing through the plantation in a ragged coat, they assembled again, and made up a purse of three pounds (equal to nine dollars) with which they bought cloth and linen to refit him. This was an extra bounty, not interfering with the stipend, which they continue to pay regularly.

Another planter was sued for a very considerable amount, in consequence of several protested bills. Judgment was obtained, and writs issued against the property, when the negroes assembled before the door with a large sum of money tied up in bags made of old stockings, and said, if that was insufficient, hey would try to borrow as much more from their friends and relations.

These instances prove, that negroes are not brutish in their nature, and by no means divested of the finer feelings.

The Pennsylvania Gazette was one of the United States’ most prominent newspapers from 1728—before the time period of the American Revolution—until 1800. Published in Philadelphia from 1728 through 1800, The Pennsylvania Gazette is considered The New York Times of the 18th century.

Source: The Pennsylvania Gazette, March 17, 1790


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