Tag Archives: The Remonstrance
Kitchen Women

The Risk of Office Holding by Women (1913)

The Remonstrance was the official publication of the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women. First published annually and later quarterly in Boston from February, 1890 until April 1919, it provided a forum for women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women.

To the Editor of The Remonstrance:

May not we, who protest against the further extension of the franchise to women, reasonably lay stress upon a danger to the sex which will probably be one of its results, namely the increased holding of public office by women? If those who desire it, obtain Woman Suffrage, will this not come as a natural consequence?

Will those women who are not satisfied that men should choose their representatives and law-makers, be content to be exclusively represented and governed by them? Shall we not see many women strive for entrance and enter into public and political life and all that it involves for brain and body? Will they not squander and dissipate in combat with man and the usurpation of many of his functions, the strength and force which should be used for what we believe to be the real object of their existence?

For we, even as the suffragists, have our ideal for woman. We believe that she has her great work to do for the human race, but, along the lines laid down for her from the Creation. We believe that it is her part to influence and educate both man and woman towards an ever more unselfish, nobler and more spiritual conception of life.

We believe that, unaided by the franchise, she can do this for her unenlightened brother and her over-burdened sister. We believe that her spheres, in these days of wider opportunities, are not only in the home, but in the office, the department-store, and the factory also. We believe that if each true woman, standing where nature or the necessities of living have placed her, will use her powers and opportunities thoughtfully and without prejudice, man can be trusted more and more surely by her, faithfully to perform his great part in the guidance of civilization and the uplifting of society.

Since we believe this and that the right to vote and the duty of voting will add too heavily to the life-work of the conscientious woman, the world over, how much more overpowering must we consider the burden to be laid upon her inadequate body and brain, if she is to be called upon to take a place in the strenuous battle of public and political life.

—Jane Dexter

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

Post 2019-01-26

Ballots for Women: Giving or Forcing?

Members of the Massachusetts legislature, or of the legislatures of other states, who are urged to vote this winter for suffrage bills or amendments, should remember that what they are really asked to do is not to give the ballot to women, but to force it upon them.

That is what it really amounts to. The suffragists are admittedly a minority among women. As a matter of fact,—though this they do not admit—they are a small minority. Tested in any way one pleases,—by the membership of their organizations, by the signers to their petitions, or by the votes cast at school elections,—they are a small minority.

Actions speak louder than words. If the suffragists do not know that they are a small minority, why do they always bitterly oppose every proposal to submit the question to a referendum of women’s votes?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Suffrage Society

Will Women Voting “UPLIFT” Politics?

Apropos of the often-repeated claim that woman suffrage will bring about a great “uplift” in politics and government, it is instructive to note the views of a number of Colorado women as published in the Denver Republican. The women quoted are all enthusiastic suffragists and interested in the extension of the suffrage movement. But one of them, Mrs. D. Bryant Turner, speaks as follows upon this subject:

As for the old question, ‘Will women uplift and purify politics?’ the answer to that is: ‘Why should they be expected to?

The difficult ‘uplifting’ job in all things is one that men have usually been willing to hand over to their sisters; and, although it is very flattering, the fact is that women are no better than men along any lines.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Desiring Suffrage as a Neurological Disorder

“THE ENEMY AT THE GATE” – under this striking title The Outlook for April 6 (1912) published an article by Dr. Max G. Schlapp, the head of the department of neuropathology in the Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital of New York City and in the Cornell Medical School, sounding a note of warning regarding certain modern tendencies.

Dr. Schlapp’s conclusions are, in substance, that the strain of modern life is having an effect upon men, and especially upon women, that can be traced biologically; that it is such as to impair the vigor and faculties of a great proportion of children that are now being born into the world; that the effect is seen in injury to motherhood, in a reduced birthrate, in an increase in the proportion of the mentally defective, the insane and the delinquent; and that the resultant conditions are such that nothing short of a radical change in present tendencies can save modern civilized peoples from going the way of the Greeks and the Romans.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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voting

What Use is the Constitution for Female Citizens?

The Remonstrance was the official publication of the Massachusetts Association Opposed to the Further Extension of Suffrage to Women. First published annually and later quarterly in Boston from February, 1890 until April 1919, it provided a forum for women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women.

WHAT IS THE USE OF A CONSTITUTION?

A certain New York politician, to whom it was once objected that the thing which he wished to do was unconstitutional, answered gaily, “What is the Constitution between friends?” He thereby gained a reputation of a sort and contributed to the public amusement.

The National Woman Suffrage Association, at its meeting in Nashville last November, appears to have been influenced by a similar sentiment. It went on record, without a dissenting vote, in favor of working for a bill in Congress, giving women the vote for Congressmen and United States Senators. The proposed bill is intended to enable women to vote for United States Senators and Representatives, as The Woman’s Journal explains it, “without the elaborate procedure required to pass and ratify a National Constitutional Amendment.” This “elaborate procedure” has bothered the suffragists a good deal for a long period of years, and it is easy to believe the statement of The Woman’s Journal that the proposal “aroused a great deal of enthusiasm.”

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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