Tag Archives: The Revolution
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The Revolution: Notes About Women (December 1870)

In addition to it the original writing, The Revolution sometimes included what we now call a Listicle where they shared short items picked up from other papers or in letters written to the editors.

Some items were just relayed while others have a little editorial comment added. Those comments are in italics below.

Notes About Women

  • · “Feminary” is a new Western expression for female seminary.
  • · For the first time in thirty years the New Haven county jail is without a female prisoner.
  • · A charming girl in Covington, Ky., last week, giggled to the extent of dislocating her lower jaw.
  • · Mary Louise Boree is the first purely African girl whom the New Orleans schools have graduated as a teacher.
  • · New York young ladies are forming “walking clubs,” for the purpose of walking eight or ten miles a day.
  • · A German woman living at Batavia, N. Y., has this fall husked with her own hands over three hundred bushels of corn.
  • · Here is a specimen of wood-craft: “Miss Caroline Wood, of Iowa, has reclaimed 160 acres of wild prairie land, and has planted 200 fruit and 4,000 maple trees, all with her own hands.
  • · “A girl who has lost her beau may as well hang up her fiddle.” Yes, poor soul; there is nothing for her to hope for now, this side the grave. [Sarcastic humor was a hallmark of some Suffrage paper
    editors.] (more…)

gentlemanlyog

A Strong-Minded Woman of a Gentlemanly Deportment (1870)

To say a man is strong-minded, in common parlance, is high praise. To say a woman is strong-minded, in the same dialect, is like saying she has a beard. It is a reproach. Now let us see what makes the difference.

Weakness abstractly is bad. It is always unsatisfactory, from weak tea to weak temper, and the epithet weak applied to great and valuable things in life, such as sense, will, temper, men, timbers, rails, and so on, indefinitely, is a sentence of condemnation; even to say she is a weak woman is not considered very complimentary.

Strength, on the contrary, is a good quality in itself; abstractly it is good. It is only in the wrong place that it becomes bad, and there are very few places in the world of matter or mind where it is unwelcome or necessarily unmanageable.

Take the material world. Iron is the best of metals, because the strongest for most purposes. The oak is the grandest of trees because of its strength. The strength of the hills in nature, the strength of construction of buttress, of tower and bridge, is the highest quality of each. All good things are better for strength. The stronger they are, the more valuable they are.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Superious

Man or Woman: Who is Superior?

Julia Crouch submitted this letter to The Revolution for the December 3, 1868 issue. The Revolution, a weekly women’s rights newspaper, was the official publication of the National Woman Suffrage Association formed by feminists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony to secure women’s enfranchisement through a federal constitutional amendment.

Who is Superior?

There are some persons who think that because there is a difference between man and woman, that one must be superior, that they cannot be equal. Can they not see that if a perfect orange is divided in the middle the parts will be equal?

Man and woman make a perfect whole. In God they are one, in Heaven they are neither male nor female; on earth they are male and female for the purpose of propagating the species. But if a difference in organization and temperament makes one superior, who shall say which is the superior? “Man has beard,” one says. But we have yet to learn that beard is expressive of sense and judgment: but if man has board, then we can say that woman has none, and therefore being different from man, have we not as much reason to say that she is superior, as for man to preach superiority on the same principle?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Women in Politics

Women in Politics (The Revolution, 1868)

Such is the heading of an important article in the New York News. The suggestions made are too important to be overlooked. Coming from the very highest democratic authority, we may in reproducing some of them wake again republican wrath, as did Miss Anthony when she invaded the late Democratic Convention with her memorial for Woman’s Suffrage, without out first asking republican permission. But as we have decided not to make the republican party any longer the custodian of our cause, we shall here give our readers another sample of democratic reasoning on the subject, asking the republicans to match it, as they challenged so dramatically of their nominee at Chicago. The News says in opening:

The appearance of a female delegate in a national party Convention, such as that of Miss Anthony in the late Convention held in this city, marks an era in the woman’s rights movement. The acceptance and reading of her address is the first sign, of recognition, in a political sense, that woman has received from any of the great parties of the day. No doubt she will feel encouraged to urge on the enterprise she has undertaken. It is too late to cry down the female suffrage movement with contempt. Opponents of the proposed innovation in our political system must prepare themselves to grapple with a substantial foe.

Already the advocates of female suffrage have made an impression in England. Among those who favor the idea are such powerful and practical statesmen as John Bright and John Stuart Mill; and the strength its friends exhibited in the British Parliament astonished the keenest observers of the times. In our own country the strong-minded females have organized into a league, started a lively newspaper organ, instituted a series of public meetings, and enlisted the services of popular speakers, like George Wm. Curtis, James M. Scoville of New Jersey, and George Francis Train. In the recent elections in the State of Kansas the advocates of female suffrage were able to carry over nine thousand of the voter of the sterner sex with them, which was, at least one-third of the whole vote polled.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Howes Appeal

Julia Ward Howe’s Appeal to Womanhood

Again, in the sight of the Christian world, have the skill and power of two great nations exhausted themselves in mutual murder. Again have the sacred questions of international justice been committed to the fatal mediation of military weapons. In this day of progress, in this century of light, the ambition of rulers has been allowed to barter the dear interests of domestic life for the bloody exchanges of the battle-field. Thus men have done. Thus men will do. But women need no longer be made a party to proceedings which fill the globe with grief and horror. Despite the assumptions of physical force, the mother has a sacred and commanding word to say to the sons who owe their life to her suffering. That word should now be heard, and answered to as never before.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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