Tag Archives: The Western Woman Voter
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Voting Machines in the United States (1911)

(The Western Woman Voter, April 1911) Voting machines are in use in nearly one thousand cities and towns in the United States. These machines count the ballots as they are cast, so that twenty minutes after the close of the election the result is known. There is, moreover, a much smaller percentage of lost votes than by the ballot method. In San Francisco, where the machines were in use before the fire, the percentage of the votes cast that was recorded and counted was 99⅞. No large city ever showed such high percentage of the ballots cast actually counted.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

The laws of New York, California, Indiana, Wisconsin, Colorado, Minnesota, New Jersey, Iowa, Connecticut, Utah, Ohio, Nebraska, Michigan and Montana permit the use of voting machines and in all of these states they are gradually taking the place of the paper ballot. (more…)


jury box

An American Jury Goes On Strike (1911)

At last, an American jury has stood on its constitutional rights and refused to return a “directed verdict” at the dictation of a judge.

The facts are as follows: Bridget McDermott died in St. Louis in 1905, cutting off one of her daughters, Mary Farrington, and three other heirs with $1.00 each and leaving the estate to two daughters, naming Rev. Father John White as executor. The two daughters died of consumption about three years ago, having previously conveyed valuable improved realty to Father White. He testified he had paid the taxes on the property and paid the funeral expenses of the two daughters, who gave him the property for “$1.00 and other considerations.”

Mary Farrington had filed suit to set aside her mother’s will and had a suit pending to set aside the conveyance of realty to the executor.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Chicago’s Open Window School

In September 1909, two rooms were opened in the Graham school in Chicago to show what natural cold air will do for normal pupils. No selection of individuals was made except that as children entered the school for their first year’s work they were given their choice of entering a cold room or a warm one. Of course, some pains were taken to inform the parents in advance as to what it was expected the cold air would do. After several weeks of trial in which no bad effects followed, teachers, parents and pupils, seeing what had been done for those in the two rooms, asked for rooms in the other grades for the same sort of work. The school year closed with seven open rooms.

So satisfactory was the work that the school opened in September, 1910, with twenty cold rooms, merely retaining enough of the warm air rooms to insure a place in a warm room in every grade for pupils whose parents desired them to have it and also a place for teachers to work in warm air in case some of them feared that work in a cold room might prove too strenuous. The Board of Education also constructed two canvas-sided rooms on a roof of the Graham School to give the matter a more definite trial and to gather the results of the work of normal pupils in open air. The rooms may be duplicated anywhere for six hundred dollars each. They were completed too late in the spring for any tests to be made in them.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

(more…)


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