Tag Archives: Woman Suffrage
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The Revolution: Notes About Women (December 1870)

In addition to it the original writing, The Revolution sometimes included what we now call a Listicle where they shared short items picked up from other papers or in letters written to the editors.

Some items were just relayed while others have a little editorial comment added. Those comments are in italics below.

Notes About Women

  • · “Feminary” is a new Western expression for female seminary.
  • · For the first time in thirty years the New Haven county jail is without a female prisoner.
  • · A charming girl in Covington, Ky., last week, giggled to the extent of dislocating her lower jaw.
  • · Mary Louise Boree is the first purely African girl whom the New Orleans schools have graduated as a teacher.
  • · New York young ladies are forming “walking clubs,” for the purpose of walking eight or ten miles a day.
  • · A German woman living at Batavia, N. Y., has this fall husked with her own hands over three hundred bushels of corn.
  • · Here is a specimen of wood-craft: “Miss Caroline Wood, of Iowa, has reclaimed 160 acres of wild prairie land, and has planted 200 fruit and 4,000 maple trees, all with her own hands.
  • · “A girl who has lost her beau may as well hang up her fiddle.” Yes, poor soul; there is nothing for her to hope for now, this side the grave. [Sarcastic humor was a hallmark of some Suffrage paper
    editors.] (more…)

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Our National President Makes Stirring Appeal (Call for Suffrage in 1910)

Dr. Anna Howard Shaw makes the following stirring appeal to the women of America. These words have a special meaning in the days we celebrate our independence.

We ask the native born American women to consider the principles for which the American commonwealth stands, the magnitude and the daring of these principles, and, because of that very daring, the dancer which lies in the effort to put into effect the American ideal. We ask them to consider the courage and energy of the American women of the Revolution, who supported their husbands and sons in casting off conventional ties, and the need of help to American men today In fighting, by means of the ballot, internal disasters more formidable to this country than military foes from without.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Amazing Line-Up of Women Voters (1919)

Whether or not the Federal Suffrage Amendment is ratified by a sufficient number of the States in time to permit the women of every State to vote in the next Presidential campaign, there will be 15,492,751 women eligible to vote in 1920. Leaders of women in this country are endeavoring to increase the number to 29,000,000, by securing the ratification of the Federal Amendment by thirty-six States within the next few month.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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A Strong-Minded Woman of a Gentlemanly Deportment (1870)

To say a man is strong-minded, in common parlance, is high praise. To say a woman is strong-minded, in the same dialect, is like saying she has a beard. It is a reproach. Now let us see what makes the difference.

Weakness abstractly is bad. It is always unsatisfactory, from weak tea to weak temper, and the epithet weak applied to great and valuable things in life, such as sense, will, temper, men, timbers, rails, and so on, indefinitely, is a sentence of condemnation; even to say she is a weak woman is not considered very complimentary.

Strength, on the contrary, is a good quality in itself; abstractly it is good. It is only in the wrong place that it becomes bad, and there are very few places in the world of matter or mind where it is unwelcome or necessarily unmanageable.

Take the material world. Iron is the best of metals, because the strongest for most purposes. The oak is the grandest of trees because of its strength. The strength of the hills in nature, the strength of construction of buttress, of tower and bridge, is the highest quality of each. All good things are better for strength. The stronger they are, the more valuable they are.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Two Poems from Women’s Suffrage Ally, Experience Estabrook (1887)

This letter from Experience Estabrook was printed in the July 1887 issue of The Woman’s Tribune:

Your April number has a poetic selection entitled “Who’ll Rock the Cradle,” of which this is the last stanza:

That kindly hand will present be,
On proud election day,
That rocked the cradle, last while she
Her taxes went to pay.”

—Woman’s Standard.

The thought in this is very good and while I do not care how extensively nor in what form it is circulated, I am going to insist that it shall not be forgotten that it (the thought) belongs to me by right of discovery, and I hereby file with the TRIBUNE, a place altogether appropriate, my caveat as the lawyers call it, against any and all adverse claimants.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), The Woman’s Tribune (1883-1909) and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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