Tag Archives: Woman Suffrage
voting-machines-1911-og

Voting Machines in the United States (1911)

(The Western Woman Voter, April 1911) Voting machines are in use in nearly one thousand cities and towns in the United States. These machines count the ballots as they are cast, so that twenty minutes after the close of the election the result is known. There is, moreover, a much smaller percentage of lost votes than by the ballot method. In San Francisco, where the machines were in use before the fire, the percentage of the votes cast that was recorded and counted was 99⅞. No large city ever showed such high percentage of the ballots cast actually counted.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

The laws of New York, California, Indiana, Wisconsin, Colorado, Minnesota, New Jersey, Iowa, Connecticut, Utah, Ohio, Nebraska, Michigan and Montana permit the use of voting machines and in all of these states they are gradually taking the place of the paper ballot. (more…)


Post 2019-01-26

Ballots for Women: Giving or Forcing?

Members of the Massachusetts legislature, or of the legislatures of other states, who are urged to vote this winter for suffrage bills or amendments, should remember that what they are really asked to do is not to give the ballot to women, but to force it upon them.

That is what it really amounts to. The suffragists are admittedly a minority among women. As a matter of fact,—though this they do not admit—they are a small minority. Tested in any way one pleases,—by the membership of their organizations, by the signers to their petitions, or by the votes cast at school elections,—they are a small minority.

Actions speak louder than words. If the suffragists do not know that they are a small minority, why do they always bitterly oppose every proposal to submit the question to a referendum of women’s votes?

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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Mother and Son_ No Relation Whatever!

Mother and Son: No Relation Whatever!

A mother has been judged in New York as not next of kin to her own son. A case in hand was a young man killed in an accident. The father brought a suit and would have been adjudged damages, but he died and the mother could not collect damages, as by law she is not “next of kin” to her own son!

This is one of the California laws that suffragists say is a relic of slavery days and should be erased from the statute books: “Every minor of the age of fourteen years or upwards may be bound by indenture as an apprentice to any mechanical trade or art or the occupation of farming to the age of eighteen, if a female, or to the age of twenty-one years, if a male.”

This law, in connection with a law which gives to fathers the sole right to all the money earned by minor children, makes a certain type of slavery among minors possible. The suffragists maintain that there is no other means equal to voting for learning the weakness of California laws and therefore helping in the elimination of worthless laws and dangerous laws.

Source: The Western Woman Voter, September 1911

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

Woman Suffrage and the Darwinian Theory

Woman Suffrage and the Darwinian Theory (1878)

DEAR BALLOT BOX: Do you know that this interminable drudgery imposed on American mothers of petitioning—petitioning for the ballot—this humiliation of forever praying to their own sons to be allowed to enjoy their birthright with the men born of them, furnishes me with stronger evidence of the Darwinian theory than anything I am able to find elsewhere. Were it not for this relic which has no parallel in the history left us of the dark ages—of the long ago buried past, there would be little proof of such an age having once enshrouded the earth.

The brutish vulgarity which we see cropping out in men who ignorantly disgrace themselves by ignoring their own mothers, is conclusive evidence to me that the race must have come up through the long line of animal ancestry to the “man in the dugout,” and from thence to the men in our present Congress, some of whom still seem inclined to root, and grunt, and squeal, if others assert rights equal to their own: lest the visual line of their own pen be the world’s extent, and, if others should be allowed to enjoy like blessings, they would be crowded, off the stage of action. While there are other men on the same floor, who, I am proud to say, are infinitely in advance of all this, which is a promise and prophecy of the oncoming of those others, for which I thank God and take courage; and love to accept this theory because it gives us a better outlook—this law of eternal progress must in cycles of years lift the most sordid to a higher plane of nobler action.

This item, and others like it, can be found in Accessible Archive’s Women’s Suffrage Collection. We can provide access to fully searchable newspapers by and for women including The Lily (1849-1856), National Citizen and Ballot Box (1878-1881), The Revolution (1868-1872), The New Citizen (1909-1912), The Western Woman Voter (1911-1913), and the antisuffrage newspaper, The Remonstrance (1890-1913).

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AABlog-2018-07-20

An Amazing Line-Up of Women Voters (1919)

Whether or not the Federal Suffrage Amendment is ratified by a sufficient number of the States in time to permit the women of every State to vote in the next Presidential campaign, there will be 15,492,751 women eligible to vote in 1920. Leaders of women in this country are endeavoring to increase the number to 29,000,000, by securing the ratification of the Federal Amendment by thirty-six States within the next few months.

Sixteen States have ratified the amendment since its passage by the Sixty-sixth Congress last June, within two weeks after the Republicans returned to power when eighty-six percent. of the G. O. P. members of the Senate voted “for” the resolution, and forty-six percent of the Democrats voted “against.”

Frank Leslie’s Weekly, published from 1855 to 1922, was an American illustrated news publication started by publisher and illustrator Frank Leslie. While only 30 copies of the first edition were printed, by 1897 its circulation had grown to an estimated 65,000 copies.
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